The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

access  energy  gasoline  regulation  energy-101  jobs-and-economy  gas-prices  fuel-prices  onshore-oil-production  onshore-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Gasoline prices have been rising with the approach of the summer driving season – up to about $3.66, according to AAA – pushed there by rising crude oil prices. U.S. consumers need help. And they could get it – if the administration pursued a number of energy policies to put downward pressure on global crude costs, while abandoning other choices that could harm consumers.

API Chief Economist John Felmy’s reporter briefing Thursday focused attention on two paths: one that will increase domestic production of oil and natural gas and one that won’t. Unfortunately, the administration – via proposals to increase energy taxes and a new wave of questionable regulation – looks headed down the wrong path, a recipe for disaster for American energy:

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ethanol  gasoline  renewable-fuel-standard 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted April 19, 2013

It’ll take more than 60 seconds to debunk the main untruths in Fuels America’s video, “The Truth Behind High Gasoline Prices in 60 Seconds” – but then fact often is more complicated than fiction.

First, a few words about Fuels America. It’s a collection of groups committed to “protecting” the flawed Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), with its broken mandates for increasing use of ethanol. The organization that includes the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) and major corn growers is attacking America’s oil and natural gas industry – ironically, ethanol’s biggest customer.

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diesel  ethanol  gasoline  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 26, 2013

The biofuels/ethanol debate has moved over to National Journal’s Energy Experts Blog, with this week’s posts addressing whether the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) that mandates biofuel use should be left alone, amended or repealed. Some of what others are saying:


Bernard Weinstein – associate director of SMU’s Maguire Energy Institute:

“The biofuels mandate has done little or nothing to enhance America’s energy independence or security. Oil imports have dropped dramatically over the past five years, from 60 percent of consumption to around 35 percent; but the credit goes to the shale revolution that has greatly boosted domestic production. What’s more, the potential contribution of ethanol to the energy mix has been oversold. Processing the entire U.S. corn crop into ethanol would yield energy equal to just 12 percent of gasoline consumption. … But the most pressing reason for repealing the ethanol mandate is that refiners must blend a larger quantity every year. … Consequently, refiners are up against a “blend wall” as the mandate forces them to purchase more ethanol than they can safely put into gasoline.”

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renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol  gasoline 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted March 22, 2013

Paying for Ethanol's Infrastructure. Ethanol supporters have a blog post up suggesting that if the oil and natural gas industry simply invested in the “modern fuel distribution infrastructure needed to dispense greater than E10 blends,” industry’s issues with unworkable ethanol mandatesunder the Renewable Fuel Standard would vanish.

Maybe in some alternate universe – one that’s disconnected from economic reality, real costs and operating margins. Don’t take our word for it. Take a look at this letter to the Wall Street Journal from Dan Gilligan, president of the Petroleum Marketers Association of America, the folks who own the gasoline stations, convenience stores, heating oil businesses, truck stops and other companies that invest in and market petroleum products. 

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supply  prices  gasoline  energy  demand  crude-oil  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

Gasoline prices have been climbing. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports:

The average U.S. retail price for regular motor gasoline has risen 45 cents per gallon since the start of the year, reaching $3.75 per gallon on February 18. Between January 1 and February 19, the price of Brent crude, the waterborne light sweet crude grade that drives the wholesale price of gasoline sold in most U.S. regions, rose about $6 per barrel, or about 15 cents per gallon.

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fracking  oil34  gasoline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2013

In its online debate this week on hydraulic fracturing, The Economist poses this question: “Do the benefits derived from shale gas outweigh the drawbacks of fracking?” It’s a thought-provoking question that has elicited a number of thoughtful responses.

Let’s examine some of the arguments of those who answer that question no. Now, in a debate you typically lead with your best argument, so it’s telling that opposition’s opening shot against hydraulic fracturing basically is a big swing and a miss. Here it is:

Fracking currently enjoys exemptions from parts of at least seven major national statutes, including the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act. If fracking is so safe, why can't the industry be held to the same standards as everyone else?

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diesel  diesel-fuel  ethanol  gasoline  ethanol-contamination  rfa34  renewable-fuels-association  ethanol-lobby 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted September 14, 2012

A recent study suggested ethanol might be the source of corrosion in underground tanks used to store ultra low sulfur diesel fuel. Battelle, which conducted the study, checked a number of hypotheses, weighed the data and evidence and came to a conclusion pointing to ethanol

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keystone-xl  gasoline  exports  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 12, 2012

News that the United States was a net exporter of finished petroleum products last year prompts logical questions – and some wrongheaded commentary – about refining, the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and whether finished products should be leaving the country. Energy blogger Robert Rapier argues net exports are good news for the U.S. economy and quite reasonable in what is, in fact, a global market.

“This news did not sit well with some people, who argued that those exports could have been better used in the U.S. I read numerous comments from people angry that we are exporting fuel. In fact, one of the arguments against the Keystone Pipeline is that the fuel could end up being exported after it is refined. I don’t think the people who are making these arguments have thought this through very well.”

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