The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

new-mexico  oil-and-natural-gas  fracking  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Energy = opportunity – in New Mexico and across the U.S. Indeed, New Mexico is energy-rich, ranking sixth nationally in oil production and eighth in marketed natural gas output in 2015. Oil production has more than doubled since 2009, helped by development of the Permian Basin shale in southeastern New Mexico with hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. 

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west-virginia  vote4energy  natural-gas  fracking  climate  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 30, 2016

Used to be, when you thought of West Virginia and energy, you thought of coal. Indeed, West Virginia remains a big coal producer, ranking No. 2 in the country (behind Wyoming) in 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics. But the U.S. energy renaissance – driven by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – has the state’s natural gas production skyrocketing, with benefits to the state and the entire country.

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epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 12, 2016

As an agency that fundamentally bases its work on fact and scientific analysis, EPA needs to follow the facts and the science on the safety of hydraulic fracturing.

More than a year ago, after a five-year, multi-million dollar study on the impacts of fracking on drinking water resources, EPA concluded: “We did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States.” The report affirms volumes of scientific data, including more than 950 sources of information, technical reports, information from stakeholders and peer-reviewed EPA scientific reports.

A move by the agency’s Science Advisory Board (SAB), questioning the draft report’s conclusion, is without basis, because EPA’s work and its findings were and are scientifically sound.

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natural-gas  fracking  emission-reductions  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2016

Thanks to fracking, the United States has reduced CO2 emissions to levels not seen in more than two decades, allowing the U.S. to lead the world in that important climate category – as it leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Around the globe there’s a lot of talk about making climate progress; the United States is actually achieving that progress, and it is doing so without sacrificing jobs, economic growth, energy security or consumer affordability.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  trade  us-energy-security  fracking  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2016

Gaining strength is the argument that the United States should move as expeditiously as possible on liquefied natural gas (LNG) export infrastructure that would help secure America’s place in the emerging global LNG market.

The added heft is seen in two ways. First, the initial U.S. shipment of LNG passed through the newly expanded Panama Canal last week, underscoring a point made in this postthat the widened canal will shorten voyage times from U.S. LNG export facilities on the Gulf Coast to Asia and the western coast of South America, boosting the competitiveness of U.S. suppliers. Reduced voyage time means quicker turnaround times, leading to better service and a boost to U.S. competitiveness.

Secondly, an International Energy Agency (IEA) report projects the U.S. will become the world’s third-largest LNG supplier in five years, behind Qatar and Australia. 

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pennsylvania  natural-gas  fracking  us-energy-security  president-obama  vote4energy 

Stephanie Catarino Wissman

Stephanie Catarino Wissman
Posted July 28, 2016

In Pennsylvania, the energy revolution has been very, very good to the commonwealth. Marketed natural gas production, which exceeded 4.5 trillion cubic feet in 2015, more than double output from just three years earlier:

Over the past half-decade, fees paid by industry to the commonwealth have totaled more than a billion dollars. Much of the money stays at the local level and is distributed to the counties and municipalities with the most shale wells. The top beneficiaries for 2015 included Washington County ($5.68 million), Susquehanna County ($5.25 million) and Bradford County ($4.92 million). Even in a down year for the industry, revenue to the commonwealth totaled $187.7 million.

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natural-gas  electricity  economic-benefits  infrastructure  fracking  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2016

CNBC has put out its annual ranking of America’s top states for business, an analysis based on a number of things including metrics for workforce, infrastructure, access to capital and quality of life. Another of those metrics, cost of living, caught our eye because energy was part of the calculation. Indeed, in CNBC’s ranking of the country’s 10 most expensive states to live in, the cost of energy to residents a key factor.

Five members of that dubious top 10 are New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire, and energy costs there are higher than they need to be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), those states and neighbors Maine and Vermont all had costs for residential electricity and natural gas that exceeded national averages this past winter. Of course, these states are located in a part of the country where more energy infrastructure (see previous posts here and here) could positively impact energy costs.  

A couple of charts show the cost being borne by consumers in those states, in part, because there’s inadequate natural gas pipeline infrastructure to meet home heating and power generation needs during peak winter months.

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petroleum  president-obama  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  economic-benefits  access  fracking  infrastructure  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2016

Good to hear President Obama extolling some of the benefits of the U.S. energy revolution this week in North Carolina, starting with security and consumer benefits. Both are firmly linked to surging domestic oil production – which of course is why the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas output. The president:

“Remember when we were all concerned about our dependence on foreign oil? Well, let me tell you, we’ve cut the amount of oil we buy from other countries in half. Remember when the other team was promising they were going to get gas prices down in like 10 years? We did it. … So we have been able to shape an energy policy that’s good for families, good for your pocketbook.”

Indeed, producing more oil and gas here at home has had great impact on U.S. energy security and security overall. The United States is stronger in the world today because it is less dependent on others for imported energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), net imports stood at 4.6 million barrels of oil per day in 2015 – lower than any year since they were at 4.2 million barrels per day in 1985. EIA projects that in 2040 net crude imports will drop to about 1.5 million barrels per day.

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natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  safe-operations  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 14, 2016

Advanced hydraulic fracturing – the foundation of America’s historic, game-changing energy revolution – is under attack. On the presidential campaign trail, in conversations in Washington and other places, fracking faces ideologically motivated challenges from those who ignore its science and misrepresent its safety record.

It’s critically important that we have an honest conversation about hydraulic fracturing because it is responsible for at least 2 million wells and up to 95 percent of new wells being drilled – accounting for more than 43 percent of oil and 67 percent of natural gas production. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that fracking, which now accounts for about half of U.S. dry natural gas production (14 trillion cubic feet or Tcf), will account for 69 percent of production in 2040 (29 Tcf).

This is significant because increased use of clean-burning natural gas is the primary reason the United States is leading the world in reducing energy-associated carbon emissions. Without fracking and the natural gas produced by it, the United States would be with the other nations of the world who’re in search of climate solutions.

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carbon-emissions  emission-reductions  natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 9, 2016

With new government data showing that U.S. carbon emissions in 2015 were 12 percent below 2005 levels, it might be time for some to take “yes” for an answer – that yes, on reducing carbon emissions, the United States is showing the way for the rest of the world with abundant, clean-burning natural gas.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says despite the fact the U.S. economy was 15 percent larger in 2015 than it was in 2005 (inflation-adjusted numbers), energy-related carbon dioxide emissions were lower last year than they were 11 years ago. 

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