The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-production  safe-operations  regulation 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 17, 2016

America’s status as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas is delivering major benefits to U.S. families and businesses. Production increases have ensured a stable supply of affordable, reliable energy, helping drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating. Carbon emissions have also dropped – to near 20-year lows – thanks to abundant supplies of clean-burning natural gas.

It’s all possible due to hydraulic fracturing and advances in horizontal drilling. According to the Energy Department, at least 2 million oil and natural gas wells have been hydraulically fractured in this country, including up to 95 percent of new wells that account for more than 43 percent of U.S. oil production and 67 percent of its natural gas production.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  ethanol  consumers  epa34 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 27, 2016

If the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) were a candidate in this election year, its track record would invite landslide defeat.

Editorial boards of major newspapers are now echoing what a diverse coalition of restaurant associationsgrocersproducers of poultry, pork and beefenvironmental non-profits and anti-hunger groups have been saying for years.

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american-energy  president-obama  state-of-the-union  oil-and-natural-gas-production  emission-reductions  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 21, 2016

It’s become a State of the Union tradition: President Obama touts the benefits of oil and natural gas production without identifying the American energy revolution as their source. This year, the president implied that government investments in wind and solar are the reason the United States has “cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly 60 percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

“Gas under two bucks a gallon ain’t bad, either,” he continued.

The New York Times was quick with a rebuttal, writing: “Private oil and gas companies, however, were a driving force behind the most important changes in the United States’ energy landscape over the past seven years: lower fossil fuel emissions and a reduction in dependence on imported oil. … A glut of domestic oil has helped lower prices and imports. The new supply of domestic natural gas has helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electric utilities have traditionally relied on coal as the cheapest fuel source, but turned to natural gas as it became cheaper.”

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natural-gas  epa34  regulation  co2-emissions  methane-emissions  climate 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 13, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pledges to start 2016 “hitting the ground running” to build on a “monumental” 2015. In a blog post last week, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy signaled her agency will continue its focus on methane and carbon regulations.

Absent from EPA’s plans was any acknowledgement that methane and carbon emissions are already down. Recognizing progress we’ve already made – and the market factors contributing to that success – is critical to avoiding costly, duplicative regulations that could undermine that progress, as well as economic growth.

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state-of-american-energy  poll  energy-policy  economic-security  ethanol  jobs  offshore-production  infrastructure  crude-oil-exports 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 7, 2016

At this year’s State of American Energy event, we highlighted the impact of energy policy on the lives and livelihoods of families and businesses in every state. The connection between policy and pocketbooks is evident after a year in which Americans saved an average $550 per driver on gasoline, due largely to strong U.S. oil and natural gas production. But to maintain the economic and security benefits of America’s 21st century energy renaissance, we’ll need to make smart policy choices that increase access to energy resources, encourage infrastructure development, rein in misguided ethanol policy and curb costly, duplicative regulations.

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offshore-access  economic-growth  energy-poicy  hydraullic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-production  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  ozone-regulations 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 29, 2015

2015 ends on a high note for U.S. energy policy as Congress voted to repeal the obsolete, ‘70s-era ban on crude exports. Dozens of studies agree that lifting the restrictions will put downward pressure on gas prices, reduce the trade deficit, and provide a boost to economic growth and U.S. energy production.

Throughout the year, our status as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas continued to provide savings to American families and businesses while significantly enhancing our energy security. A review of the year’s energy developments shows how the American energy renaissance is paying off for consumers while also demonstrating that policymakers have some work to do in 2016.

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crude-oil-exports  economic-growth  oil-production  jobs  us-energy-security 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 22, 2015

Almost exactly 40 years after it was instated, the ban on crude exports has been lifted. A relic of ‘70s-era energy scarcity, the ban makes no sense now that the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Numerous studies have found that lifting the ban will help put downward pressure on gas prices, create jobs, grow our economy and lower our trade deficit.

Lifting the ban is also a security win for the U.S. and our allies. With the administration’s push to allow Iran to export its oil to the global market, it’s time for U.S. producers to have the same opportunity. Our allies around the world are eager to reduce their reliance on energy from less friendly nations.

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infrastructure  energy  hydraulic-fracturing  electricity  gas-prices  natural-gas  heating-fuels 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 16, 2015

In November, Americans were grateful for the lowest Thanksgiving gas prices in seven years. Thanks largely to the American energy resurgence, drivers continue to enjoy relief at the pump – with the national average close to $2.00, according to AAA.

As winter approaches, the good news continues with the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Winter Fuels Outlook. Due to a “combination of warmer weather and lower fuel prices,” EIA projects household heating costs will be lower than the previous two winters.

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crude-oil-exports  oil-and-natural-gas-development  security  economic-growth  jobs  congress 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted October 14, 2015

Highlights from API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s conference call with reporters in which he discussed efforts to lift America’s 1970s-era ban on crude oil exports and the positive climate impacts of the U.S. energy revolution in advance of next month’s COP21 conference in Paris.

Last week the U.S. House of Representatives sent a clear message that it stands for a brighter energy and economic future for our nation when it approved with a strong bipartisan majority lifting the 1970s era ban on crude oil exports. We now call on the Senate to do the same. We urge them to unleash our nation’s energy potential by ending this vestige of our nation’s era of energy scarcity, dependence and insecurity.

According to [studies by Columbia University and Brookings/NERA], putting this additional U.S. oil on the world market could reduce the price of a gallon of gasoline by as much as 12 cents a gallon, a significant savings for consumers. American consumers could save about $5.8 billion per year by 2020, [according to an ICF study]. The study also found that by lifting the ban on crude exports could create up to 300,000 American jobs, well beyond oil-producing states. Eighteen states could gain more than 5,000 jobs each in 2020 from the export of U.S. crude oil. Every other major study agrees. …

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analysis  climate-change  energy-development  emissions  natural-gas-benefits  jack-gerard 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted September 17, 2015

Below is the first of a short series of posts on the intersection of energy development and efforts to meet climate-change goals. In this post, API President and CEO Jack Gerard comments on the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan and its flawed approach of picking winners and losers in the energy sector.

On Monday, Aug. 3, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced sweeping new carbon regulations for power plants. By Wednesday, Aug. 5, the government announced carbon emissions from power plants in April 2015 reached a 27-year low.

Did the costly, top-down mandates of the Clean Power Plan really work that quickly? Of course not. The dramatic emissions reductions are the result of market forces that have nothing to do with heavy-handed government regulations and everything to do with the fact that the United States is the world’s leading producer of natural gas.

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