The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  jobs  economy  fracking  lng-exports  exports  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 30, 2014

The Hill: The Department of Energy (DOE) released two reports Thursday with favorable conclusions about the environmental impacts of exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG).

The department said it is not “reasonably foreseeable” that there would be any domestic environmental impacts from the increased natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. And in Europe and Asia, the natural gas would have much lower greenhouse gas emissions than coal when used for power generation.

The DOE is publishing the reports to gather comments on them and eventually use them in determining whether individual LNG export applications are in the country’s interest. Neither report is required by law, the agency said.

The reports came the same day the DOE proposed a new, streamlined process for considering applications to export LNG to countries with which the United States does not have a free trade agreement.

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energy-security  economy  jobs  energy-policy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 28, 2014

The Hill (Charles McConnell): The two cornerstones of our global society that are fundamental to our lives today and for our future are 1) the affordability and security of our energy and 2) environmental responsibility. The balance and harmony of these two are what comprise energy sustainability, the topic I will be contributing to in the coming year for The Hill.

In my former role as assistant secretary of energy at the Department of Energy and my current position as executive director of Rice University's Energy and Environment Initiative, we are constantly challenged by this responsibility of energy sustainability in the utilization of fossil fuels. Our future will be determined by increasing energy requirements on a global basis for electricity, fuels and chemicals to meet a doubling of world demand by 2050. Fossil fuels will continue to be more than 80 percent of the world's fuel supply in 2050, as cited by the International Energy Agency, so it is not "if" we will be consuming coal, oil and natural gas, but "how." We must have a genuine "all of the above" energy strategy, and to do so, we must invest in fossil-fuel technology to ensure energy sustainability.

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economy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  jobs  innovation  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 27, 2014

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Mark D. Caskey, president of Steel Nation Steel Buildings, a Washington County company that constructs gas compression stations for energy companies, is no stranger to having doors slammed in his face.

In fact, when he pitched the idea to build such stations to energy companies six years ago, that’s all that happened.

“We tried to talk to every big midstream company, trying to get our foot in the door,” Mr. Caskey said. “We’d knock on their door, they’d meet with us and they’d say, listen, ’You’ve never built a gas compression building before. We’re not going to be your guinea pig.’”

Gas compression stations, he explained, gather gas from wells. They also separate and cool the gas before transporting it to major transmission lines.

In 2008 when Steel Nation opened, the company focused on building prep plants that wash and separate coal for coal companies.

But after a friend from oil and gas company Range Resources took him to a drill site, Mr. Caskey realized he could take his talents to the natural gas industry. 

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american-energy  jobs  economy  texas  ohio  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 23, 2014

Bloomberg Businessweek: Mark Hiduke recently raised $100 million to build his three-week-old company. The 27-year-old isn’t a Silicon Valley technology entrepreneur. He’s a Texas oilman.

Now that a breakthrough in shale drilling technology has U.S. oil and gas production booming, an aging workforce is welcoming a new generation of wildcatters, engineers, and aspiring oil barons. After years of failing to attract and retain young talent, the industry is suddenly brimming with upstart millennials such as Hiduke—oil and gas veterans call it “the great crew change.” “I’ve never seen an industry do what the oil and gas industry has done in the last 10 years,” says T. Boone Pickens, the 86-year-old oilman. “Ten years ago I could not have made this statement that you have picked the right career.”

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american-energy  jobs  economy  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 22, 2014

Many analysts and politicians say this resource is the next industrial revolution. Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," has helped lead a boom in gas and oil production in the U.S. The new technology is unlocking oil and shale gas resources, spurring economic activity and giving industry a competitive edge with less expensive gas and electricity prices.

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american-energy  energy-efficiency  fracking  jobs  economy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 13, 2014

FuelFix Blog: Oil production will continue to soar in the six major U.S. shale plays, with more barrels pumped per rig, according to federal projections released Monday.

 

Total oil production in the six regions is expected to grow to 4.43 million barrels per day in June, an increase of 75,000 barrels per day compared to May, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The federal agency expects oil rigs will produce an average of 271 barrels per day each, an increase of one barrel over May.

 

The projection reflects the growing efficiency of rigs since the U.S. energy boom began. In June 2007, each rig produced an average of just 116 barrels per day in the most efficient region, the Bakken Shale.

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american-energy  fracking  energy-efficiency  economy  jobs  innovation  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 12, 2014

Buffalo News: The sprawling hillside dairy farms of Neil Vitale and Jim Van Blarcom seemed to be, for 3½ decades, reflections of one another on opposite sides of the New York-Pennsylvania border.

But over the past four years, Vitale and Van Blarcom have come to live in different economic worlds.

Vitale’s Organic Farm, located in New York’s Steuben County and beset by what its owner calls high taxes and a regulation-happy state government, has shrunk in size by almost 30 percent. He’s had to sell off land to stay afloat – and it wouldn’t have happened, he said, if the state had let him cash in on the riches buried thousands of feet beneath his property. 

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american-energy  economy  jobs  fracking  ethanol  arctic 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 1, 2014

Fuelfix Blog (Matt Smith): Let’s go a little controversial here. The US oil boom is such a headline-grabbing topic at the moment that I cannot help but draw comparisons betwixt it and its pop culture equivalent, Miley Cyrus. And while on that tangent, the oil cartel OPEC reminds me of…Justin Bieber: just as US oil production is surging in stature, OPEC’s dominance appears to be waning.

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fracking  american-energy  jobs  economy  energy-security  new-york  texas  ohio  keystone-xl-pipeline  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 30, 2014

Albany Business Review: Some New York farmers, particularly those living in the state's Southern Tier, are in favor of high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Steuben County dairy farmer Terry Waters, 60, said it would "pull us out of the hole."

 

As farmers like Waters continue to face financial hardship due to rising costs, they are seeing their counterparts in Pennsylvania benefiting from the natural gas resources located underneath their properties.

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exports  jobs  ohio  maryland  texas  north-dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 29, 2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Whether to allow more exports of U.S. oil and natural gas has become a matter of political debate in Washington. But to economists, the answer is clear: The nation would benefit.

The vast majority of economists surveyed this month by The Associated Press say lifting restrictions on exports of oil and natural gas would help the economy even if it meant higher fuel prices for consumers.

More exports would encourage investment in oil and gas production and transport, create jobs, make oil and gas supplies more stable and reduce the U.S. trade deficit, they say.

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