The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-development  job-growth  economic-growth  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 25, 2014

The energy industry is working for America. A new Manhattan Institute report finds that in the slowly recovering U.S. economy the oil and natural gas industry is creating jobs and generating broad economic stimulus. Top findings:

  • While overall U.S. employment has yet to return levels predating the 2008 recession, the number of oil and natural gas jobs has grown 40 percent since then.
  • The U.S. energy revolution is almost entirely the result of development by more than 20,000 small and midsize businesses. The typical oil and natural gas firm has fewer than 15 employees.
  • Industry jobs are geographically dispersed. Sixteen states have more than 150,000 jobs in the oil and natural gas sector.

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unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 19, 2014

The outlook for U.S. energy from shale and other tight-rock formations just keeps improving. Two new assessments underscore this.

First, a panel hosted this week by CSIS revisited the National Petroleum Council (NPC) report on U.S. unconventional natural gas issued in 2011 and concluded that new discoveries and technologies paint an even brighter picture than NPC did nearly three years ago.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  job-creation  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 30, 2014

President Obama, during his State of the Union address to Congress this week:

“… one of the biggest factors in bringing more jobs back is our commitment to American energy. The ‘all the above’ energy strategy I announced a few years ago is working … “

Yes, “all of the above” is working. It refers to embracing all energy sources – oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, hydro, renewables and others. That the approach is working is seen in the United States’ increasing energy self-sufficiency. And America is more energy self-sufficient because we’re less reliant on others – chiefly thanks to surging domestic oil and natural gas production.

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soae-2014  state-of-american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 7, 2014

API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s annual State of American Energy address put surging U.S. oil and natural gas production into context, saying that it has created a generational opportunity to secure this country’s energy future – an opportunity that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Gerard:

“Our future is ultimately of our own design. … We will decide if America continues its march toward global energy leadership – a once-in-a-generation choice – or remains content to play a supporting role in the global energy market. We can erase what for decades has been America’s greatest economic vulnerability – our dependence on energy sources from other continents, particularly from less stable and friendly nations – and fundamentally alter the geopolitical landscape for decades to come, all while providing a much needed boost to our economy. But only if we get our energy policy right.”

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  energy-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  soae-2014 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2014

API hosts its annual State of American Energy event on Tuesday at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., and the discussion will focus on choices our country can make to increase energy development, grow jobs and the economy and make us more secure in the world. The event will be streamed live beginning at noon. Join in the conversation on Twitter by using the #SOAE14 hashtag.

The event comes at a time when policymakers are considering important energy issues, some of them framed in recent posts by the National Journal and Politico. At the top of our list of key energy issues:

Keystone XL pipeline

Federal consideration of TransCanada’s application for a cross-border permit passed the five-year mark last fall – which means the Keystone XL could have been built twice in the time the pipeline has been held up by Washington.

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american-energy  jobs  economy  environment  hydraulic-fracturing  taxes  tax-revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2013

State Already Taxes Oil in many Ways

San Francisco Chronicle (Catherine Reheis-Boyd): Tom Steyer, the San Francisco billionaire environmentalist, has launched a campaign to increase taxes on energy production in California. He thinks oil companies are allowed to "siphon California resources without providing any meaningful return to Californians."

Beginning an education campaign on inaccurate claims doesn't bode well for the quality of the educational experience.

To claim Californians receive no meaningful return for the oil we produce is puzzling. Oil companies in California generate $6 billion in tax revenues for state and local governments, according to an analysis by Purvin & Gertz in 2011. While it's true California does not have an oil severance tax per se, California taxes oil companies and oil production in a variety of other ways.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1kzQ4aP

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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 20, 2013

Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Gas Industry

Forbes: “Texas has recovered 100 percent of the jobs lost during the recession and added 597,000 beyond the previous peak in August 2008.”   – Texas State Comptroller Susan Combs

On Thursday, December 12, the Texas Comptroller’s Office released a report detailing the current state of the state’s budget.  The report was titled “Tracking the Texas Economy – Key Texas Economic Indicators”.  But given the content of the report, a better title might have been:

“Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Natural Gas Industry”

According to the Comptroller, the state ended its 2012-2013 biennium with a surplus of more than $2.6 billion, almost three times the previously projected amount of $964 million.  The reason why?  Because the Texas oil and natural gas industry’s tax payments were more than $2 billion more than anticipated.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1i8lWU5

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natural-gas-development  natural-gas-from-shale  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  liquefied-natural-gas  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 19, 2013

More from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s preview of its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook, released this week. EIA’s projections depict a United States gaining more control of its energy security with increased domestic oil and natural gas production. Let’s zero in on some of the things EIA says about natural gas.

First, domestic natural gas production is skyrocketing, thanks to output from shale.

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american-jobs  energy-security  global-markets  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 18, 2013

The U.S.’s Crude Oil Policy

Washington Post: The United States again is one of the world’s great energy powers. On Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration projected that American crude oil output will peak at nearly 10 million barrels per day by mid-decade, up from 6.5 million last year. Last month, the International Energy Agency figured that the United States would overtake Saudi Arabia as the top oil producer, at least for a time. Yet some politicians remain unwilling to let the country reap the full benefits of this boon.

For decades, the government has imposed restrictions on exporting domestically produced crude oil but not on refined petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. This arrangement seemed sensible; the country’s crude business wasn’t booming, but its refining industry was an economic powerhouse deeply embedded in world energy markets.

Now, however, new drilling techniques have resulted in a revitalization of U.S. crude production. But oil firms export only a tiny fraction of the roughly 8 million barrels they extract daily, even though the oil often isn’t the sort U.S. refineries are set up to process. Understandably, they’d like a wider market in which to sell.

Read more: http://wapo.st/18RWgmz


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american-energy  carbon-emissions  environment  pennsylvania  hydraulic-fracturing  new-york  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 17, 2013

U.S. Energy Outlook: More Oil, More Natural Gas, Less Carbon. Yay America!

Forbes: The federal government’s Energy Information Administration is out today with an early version of its Annual Energy Outlook for 2014. Their headline finding: that the United States will continue to grow less dependent on foreign oil as the miracle of our tight oil boom adds to supply and more efficient vehicles reduce demand. Yay America!

By their reckoning, domestic crude oil production will continue its surge, adding another 800,000 barrels per day in 2014 and about the same in 2015. By 2016 we should reach 9.5 million barrels per day, approaching the historical high of 9.6 million bpd back in 1970.

The boom won’t last forever, and will level off around 2020. But when domestic oil supplies do start slipping, we won’t feel it too much at first, because our vehicles will be using a lot less fuel.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1gEiWP8

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