The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  canadian-oil-sands  job-creation  oil-and-natural-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 27, 2013

The long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline and whether President Obama will agree with a strong majority of Americans who believe that the full project is in the U.S. national interest landed on a couple of year-ending lists of top energy issues, here andhere, no doubt reflecting the politics surrounding the pipeline’s five-year federal review.

Much of politicizing has been fueled by opponents who say stopping Keystone XL will stop oil sands development. The U.S. State Department disagreed in its most recent review, citing key economic factors that argue oil sands will get to market with or without the Keystone XL. The dynamic already is at work.

Last week, Canada’s National Energy Board recommended approval of the Northern Gateway pipeline to bring as much as 525,000 barrels a day of oil sands from Alberta to British Columbia. At the same time others are making plans to build loading terminals to service oil sands-bearing railroad cars. Demand for supply is driving the infrastructure needed to deliver that supply.

The question for the U.S. concerns the impact of Washington’s never-ending deliberation over the Keystone XL, even as other infrastructure for delivering oil sands moves toward reality.

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american-energy  energy-reality  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 24, 2013

Christmas in the Bakken: North Dakota City Sees Growth from Fracking

Fox News: It’s Christmas in Boomtown.

Williston, N.D., is ground zero in America's energy renaissance, with six-figure salaries the norm and stunning prosperity that extends from the oil and gas derricks to the construction, sales and service industries. But for much of the burgeoning population that has converged on Williston and other towns on the Bakken Formation, Christmas will be spent where the jobs, not the loved ones, are.

Not so for Sherri Knapp and Elijah Moyo, who are reunited this year as Moyo settles in to his lucrative new life as a crane operator. Knapp has traveled north from Florida to join her husband as they make their new home in prosperous Williston.

“It’s wonderful. Things are a lot better,” Knapp told FoxNews.com. “Last year he came home two weeks before the holiday, but this year we will be together on Christmas.”

Read more: http://fxn.ws/1ifVvfl


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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 20, 2013

Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Gas Industry

Forbes: “Texas has recovered 100 percent of the jobs lost during the recession and added 597,000 beyond the previous peak in August 2008.”   – Texas State Comptroller Susan Combs

On Thursday, December 12, the Texas Comptroller’s Office released a report detailing the current state of the state’s budget.  The report was titled “Tracking the Texas Economy – Key Texas Economic Indicators”.  But given the content of the report, a better title might have been:

“Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Natural Gas Industry”

According to the Comptroller, the state ended its 2012-2013 biennium with a surplus of more than $2.6 billion, almost three times the previously projected amount of $964 million.  The reason why?  Because the Texas oil and natural gas industry’s tax payments were more than $2 billion more than anticipated.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1i8lWU5

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american-jobs  energy-security  global-markets  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 18, 2013

The U.S.’s Crude Oil Policy

Washington Post: The United States again is one of the world’s great energy powers. On Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration projected that American crude oil output will peak at nearly 10 million barrels per day by mid-decade, up from 6.5 million last year. Last month, the International Energy Agency figured that the United States would overtake Saudi Arabia as the top oil producer, at least for a time. Yet some politicians remain unwilling to let the country reap the full benefits of this boon.

For decades, the government has imposed restrictions on exporting domestically produced crude oil but not on refined petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. This arrangement seemed sensible; the country’s crude business wasn’t booming, but its refining industry was an economic powerhouse deeply embedded in world energy markets.

Now, however, new drilling techniques have resulted in a revitalization of U.S. crude production. But oil firms export only a tiny fraction of the roughly 8 million barrels they extract daily, even though the oil often isn’t the sort U.S. refineries are set up to process. Understandably, they’d like a wider market in which to sell.

Read more: http://wapo.st/18RWgmz


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energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 12, 2013

U.S. voters continue to support approval of the full Keystone XL pipeline by strong, bipartisan majorities. A new Harris Interactive survey of 1,025 registered voters found that 72 percent agree it is in the United States’ national interest to approve the Keystone XL so it can deliver North American oil to U.S. refineries. In poll after poll, Americans have said: Build the Keystone XL.

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gulf-coast  keystone-xl-pipeline  job-creation  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 10, 2013

Saw the tweet from energy author/scholar Daniel Yergin on the startup of TransCanada’s Gulf Coast Pipeline, linking the crude oil hub in Cushing, Okla., with refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast.

Certainly, the shot of President Obama standing in front of stacks of steel pipe last year is a reminder that he went to Oklahoma to illustrate his administration’s support for the 485-mile project.

Yet, commercial startup of the project also reminds that the Gulf Coast Pipeline is part of the larger Keystone XL project, which would allow more Canadian oil sands to be delivered to U.S. refiners. The Keystone XL’s northern portion remains on the drawing board and workers idle on the sidelines after more than five years of federal review.

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energy-access  energy-economy  energy-future  hydraulic-fracturing  investments  job-creation  keystone-xl-pipeline  shale-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 26, 2013

Here’s wishing everyone a happy Thanksgiving while offering a few of the reasons we can all feel blessed because of America’s energy present and future – which the men and women of the oil and natural gas industry help deliver.

Energy Bounty

Let’s start with the fact America is enjoying a renaissance in home-grown energy production, thanks to advances in technologies and techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. Last month these played a big role in helping domestic oil output to exceed imports for the first time since 1995. Because of fracking and other technologies, more of America’s vast oiland natural gas reserves can be developed to generate fuels that provide about 62 percent of the energy Americans currently use. That’s energy that makes our lives possible – that will power our lifestyles and economy in the future, according to government projections.

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lng-exports  jobs  economy  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 21, 2013

The Strange Debate over LNG Exports

UPI Analysis:  WASHINGTON, Nov. 21 -- The debate over exports of U.S. liquefied natural gas is exceedingly strange. In Washington one sometimes hears calls to limit imports of given goods or services but limits on exports?

When U.S. President Barack Obama talked of doubling U.S. exports in five years in his 2010 State of the Union Address, some said this was an unrealistic objective but nobody said it wasn't a worthy goal, particularly to support the United States' economic recovery.

Since Adam Smith, of course, economists have understood that restrictions on imports or exports reduce overall national welfare. But the politics of imports and exports are different.

The costs of allowing imports are generally borne by identifiable firms and their workers but the benefits of imports are typically widely dispersed and thus effectively invisible.

Exports have an opposite dynamic. Increased export sales directly benefit identifiable firms and their workers. Any costs are typically spread thinly and invisibly over the whole economy.
 
Read more: http://bit.ly/1h5umeF

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energy-policy  policy  energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  biofuels  rfs34  hydraulic-fracturing  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 20, 2013

Future of U.S. Energy Production is Bright

KAAL ABC Rochester 6:  The U.S. is entering a new era of energy production said former national security advisor General James Jones who made a stop in Rochester Tuesday. He says the future of U.S. energy is bright.

Most people have noticed a change when they go to fill up.

"Gas being $3.20 instead of $3.80," said Scott Heck.

Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce member Scott Heck knows a lot more is happening with the U.S. energy industry than what we can see at the gas pump.

"Certainly being from North Dakota I know people that have been dramatically affected by the abundance of energy up there," said Heck.

North Dakota is just one of the areas that has seen the effects of the U.S. oil boom.

"The U.S. is now the largest producer of oil and gas," said General Jones.

General Jones is a former national security advisor to President Obama. He say with recent innovations and technologies the United States is now in a position where it may soon no longer have to rely on foreign oil.

"This is a whole different ball game, we need to develop our resources widely, this energy leverage gives us a role of influence in the world that we haven't enjoyed for a long time," said General Jones.

Read more: http://bit.ly/18QwkqR

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keystone-xl-pipeline  canadian-oil-sands  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 31, 2013

Canadian Oil Hits the Rails

New York Times: HOUSTON — Over the past two years, environmentalists have chained themselves to the White House fence and otherwise coalesced around stopping the Keystone XL pipeline as their top priority in the fight against global warming.

But even if President Obama rejects the pipeline, it might not matter much. Oil companies are already building rail terminals to deliver oil from western Canada to the United States, and even to Asia.

Since July, plans have been announced for three large loading terminals in western Canada with the combined capacity of 350,000 barrels a day — equivalent to roughly 40 percent of the capacity of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline that is designed to bring oil from western Alberta to refineries along the Gulf Coast.

Over all, Canada is poised to quadruple its rail-loading capacity over the next few years to as much as 900,000 barrels a day, up from 180,000 today.

Read more: http://nyti.ms/1aqEagq

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