The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  job-creation  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 30, 2014

President Obama, during his State of the Union address to Congress this week:

“… one of the biggest factors in bringing more jobs back is our commitment to American energy. The ‘all the above’ energy strategy I announced a few years ago is working … “

Yes, “all of the above” is working. It refers to embracing all energy sources – oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, hydro, renewables and others. That the approach is working is seen in the United States’ increasing energy self-sufficiency. And America is more energy self-sufficient because we’re less reliant on others – chiefly thanks to surging domestic oil and natural gas production.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  greenhouse-gas-emissions  oil-and-natural-gas-development  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 30, 2014

Report: Keystone XL Review by U.S. Expected to be Positive

The Canadian Press: Canadian officials say they're encouraged by what they're hearing about a long-awaited report on the environmental impact of the Keystone XL pipeline that could be released imminently by the U.S. State Department.

Those sources in Washington and Ottawa say they've been told the report could be ready for release within a few days — and that it will bolster the case for the controversial energy project.

"What we're hearing is that it's going to be positive for the project — and therefore positive for Canada," said one diplomat in Washington, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he hadn't seen the report himself, although he had discussed its contents with American contacts.

"The rumours certainly are that it's very thorough and that the analysis will support the project."

Read More

energy-policies  job-creation  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-development  infrastructure  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2014

Energy issue positives from President Obama’s State of the Union address Tuesday night:

Crediting surging domestic oil and natural gas production for adding jobs, creating economic growth and revitalizing the manufacturing sector.

Recognizing that because of domestic output the U.S. “is closer to energy independence than we have been in decades.” 

Read More

american-energy  energy-security  energy-policy  fracking  exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2014

What The Captain & Tennille Teach Us About Energy Policy

Forbes: Love apparently didn’t keep the ’70s pop duo Captain & Tennille together.Toni Tennille has filed for divorce from Daryl Dragon after 39 years of marriage. Just as the pair’s most famous standard now rings false, so does our 1970′s notion of energy security. For the past 40 years, U.S. energy policy has been married to the idea of scarcity. Following the oil embargoes of the 1970s, we built policies, from export bans to ethanol mandates, based on the idea that we would forever be at the mercy of other oil-producing nations.

The hydraulic fracturing boom, however, has changed all that. North America is undergoing an energy renaissance. Domestic crude oil production has reached parity with imports, and the International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. may become the world’s largest energy producer as early as next year. Yet our policies remain stuck in the dark ages of scarcity. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are resisting efforts to lift the 1970s-era ban on crude exports, citing issues of “energy security.”

As Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., told the Wall Street Journal: “If we overturn decades of law and send our oil to China and other markets, oil companies might make more money per barrel, but it will be American consumers and our national security that will pay the price.”

There’s a difference between ensuring our energy security and hoarding resources. With our newfound abundance, security comes through continued development of domestic reserves.

Read morehttp://onforb.es/KMM7kV

Read More

american-energy  energy-policy  imports  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 22, 2014

Major Economies’ Reliance on Oil and Natural Gas Imports Projected to Change Rapidly 

Changing Import Reliance

EIA Today in Energy: The 2014 Annual Energy Outlook projects declines in U.S. oil and natural gas imports as a result of increasing domestic production from tight oil and shale plays. U.S. liquid fuels net imports as a share of consumption is projected to decline from a high of 60% in 2005, and about 40% in 2012, to about 25% by 2016. The United States is also projected to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2018.

Conversely, other major economies are likely to become increasingly reliant on imported liquid fuels and natural gas. China, India, and OECD Europe will each import at least 65% of their oil and 35% of their natural gas by 2020—becoming more like Japan, which relies on imports for more than 95% of its oil and gas consumption.

The reasons for these shifts are different between emerging and developed economies. In China and India, oil demand growth from emergent middle classes will likely outpace domestic production, while OECD Europe will likely become more import reliant as a result of declining oil production in the North Sea.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1g1pCqW

Read More

regulation  permitting  investment  keystone-xl-pipeline  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2014

During Tuesday’s State of American Energy address, API President and CEO Jack Gerard sketched out a more secure energy future for the United States – based on increased access to domestic oil and natural gas reserves, industry technology and ingenuity and a business/investment climate that allows development to go forward.

Let’s focus on that last part, which is less a request for government to do something than simply asking it to avoid hindering safe and responsible energy development through misguided policies and overreaching regulation.

Read More

trade  exports  jobs  fracking  carbon-emissions  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 8, 2014

Two big stories have caught our attention the past two days. First, America’s trade deficit has sunk to a four-year low thanks to falling U.S. imports and increasing exports:

And second, the growing number of voices calling for ending the decades-old ban on U.S. crude oil exports:

Read More

soae-2014  state-of-american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 7, 2014

API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s annual State of American Energy address put surging U.S. oil and natural gas production into context, saying that it has created a generational opportunity to secure this country’s energy future – an opportunity that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Gerard:

“Our future is ultimately of our own design. … We will decide if America continues its march toward global energy leadership – a once-in-a-generation choice – or remains content to play a supporting role in the global energy market. We can erase what for decades has been America’s greatest economic vulnerability – our dependence on energy sources from other continents, particularly from less stable and friendly nations – and fundamentally alter the geopolitical landscape for decades to come, all while providing a much needed boost to our economy. But only if we get our energy policy right.”

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  energy-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  soae-2014 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2014

API hosts its annual State of American Energy event on Tuesday at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., and the discussion will focus on choices our country can make to increase energy development, grow jobs and the economy and make us more secure in the world. The event will be streamed live beginning at noon. Join in the conversation on Twitter by using the #SOAE14 hashtag.

The event comes at a time when policymakers are considering important energy issues, some of them framed in recent posts by the National Journal and Politico. At the top of our list of key energy issues:

Keystone XL pipeline

Federal consideration of TransCanada’s application for a cross-border permit passed the five-year mark last fall – which means the Keystone XL could have been built twice in the time the pipeline has been held up by Washington.

Read More

energy-policy  exports  american-energy  fracking  new-york-drilling-moratorium  keystone-xl-pipeline  arctic 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 2, 2014

Shale-Oil Boom Puts Spotlight on Crude Export Ban

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. government virtually banned the export of crude oil in the wake of the mid-1970s energy crisis. But as America pumps more crude, 2014 could be the year those constraints are lifted.

For decades, even discussing the possibility of exporting domestic oil was a political nonstarter in Washington. Now, surging U.S. production has led to the beginning of a glut along the Gulf Coast, home to the largest refinery complex in the world. Too much crude is driving down prices there, making producers eager to export some of their oil to places like Europe where prices are higher.

Read more (subscription publication): http://on.wsj.com/1d2nGfN

Read More