The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

co2-emissions  natural-gas-benefits  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  economic-growth  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

It’s hard to overstate the significance of the role that abundant, clean-burning natural gas had in bringing U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions to a 20-year low in 2012. While the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expected 2013 emissions to inch up – mostly due to increased coal use in electrical generation – the projected level still would be more than 10 percent below where emissions were in 2005

While lowering CO2 emissions is talked about in various circles, the fact is the United States already is doing it, thanks largely to natural gas – 60 percent of the U.S. total produced with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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energy-exports  lng-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  keystone-xl  oil-sands  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

Opponents of Natural Gas Exports Have It All Wrong

WSJ MarketWatch (Furchtgott-Roth): Americans opposed to the export of U.S. natural gas give many reasons for their position. But almost all of them are wrong.

The problem is that people underestimate the amount of this country’s natural gas and the potential effect exports could have on the world market.

Russia has swallowed parts of Georgia and Ukraine. No one is proposing that America send soldiers to defend those countries, even though we guaranteed Ukraine’s sovereignty in 1994 under the Budapest Memorandum. Instead, we can help our allies by diminishing Russia’s economic power over them. And that power rests on oil and gas.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  domestic-production  access  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 2, 2014

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that total net U.S. energy imports declined last year to their lowest level in more than 20 years – reflecting two energy positives for America: growth in domestic oil and natural gas production and increased exports of finished petroleum products. EIA:

Total U.S. net imports of energy, measured in terms of energy content, declined in 2013 to their lowest level in more than two decades. Growth in the production of oil and natural gas displaced imports and supported increased petroleum product exports, driving most of the decline. A large drop in energy imports together with a smaller increase in energy exports led to a 19% decrease in net energy imports from 2012 to 2013.Total energy imports declined faster—down 9% from 2012 to 2013—than in the previous year, while export growth slowed. Crude oil production grew 15%, about the same pace as in 2012, which led imports of crude oil to decrease by 12%, accounting for much of the overall decline in imports.

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crude-oil  exports  energy-exports  job-creation  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 31, 2014

new study by ICF International makes the case for lifting trade restrictions that prevent the export of U.S. crude oil – consumer savings, job creation, domestic production growth and more:

  • $5.8 billion in consumer savings a year, on average, between 2015 and 2035 due to falling costs of gasoline, heating oil and diesel fuel.
  • Up to 300,000 additional jobs created in 2020, both due to higher oil production and U.S. consumers having more money to spend on goods and services.
  • As much as a 500,000 barrels-per-day rise in domestic oil production in 2020.
  • A $22 billion decrease in the U.S. trade deficit in 2020.
  • Economic growth totaling as much as $38 billion in 2020, with an average GDP increase of up to $27 billion a year through 2035.
  • An additional $15 billion to $17 billion invested in domestic exploration, development and production between 2015 and 2020.
  • An increase of as much as $13.5 billion in federal, state and local government revenues in 2020.

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lng-exports  trade  economic-growth  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 25, 2014

U.S. to Become Top LNG Exporter, Experts Say

Fuel Fix.com: HOUSTON — The U.S. is poised to become the top exporter of liquefied petroleum gas — more commonly known as propane or butane — within just a few years, officials with research analyst IHS said Monday.

By the 2020s, the U.S. likely will displace top LPG exporters including Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, said IHS Senior Director Walt Hart, during the IHS International LPG Seminar in Houston. The domestic supply of propane and butane is on the rise, produced along with the booming output of U.S. shale gas. But the domestic market for propane and butane is relatively flat, several experts said.

That’s not the case abroad. While most U.S. LPG exports go to Latin America today, a growing portion likely will go to Asia as demand there rises, in part due to its use as a fuel source for heating and cooking but also because of its role as a feedstock for the manufacture of petrochemicals.

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lng-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  economic-growth  jobs-creation  manufacturing  hydraulic-fracturing  energy-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2014

The Huntsman Corporation’s Peter Huntsman has this op-ed in USA Today that invokes a poll in which people were asked to respond to these statements:

Some say that exporting American natural gas to other countries will increase economic growth, keep thousands employed, and help increase domestic production of natural gas. Others say that American natural gas should be used here at home, where it can lead to thousands of new manufacturing jobs, grow the entire American economy, and keep prices of natural gas affordable. Which comes closest to your view?

Actually, it’s a false choice, a little bit of opinion polling flim-flammery. We can have both – as careful, scholarly research (see here and here) has shown. We have ample natural gas reserves to supply the needs here at home as well as those of friendly overseas buyers.

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energy-investments  utica-shale  eagle-ford-shale  oil-and-natural-gas-investments  drilling  economic-growth  job-creation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 18, 2014

A few of the new good-news stories resulting from America’s oil and natural gas revolution:  

Investing in Ohio Production …

The state’s geologist says Utica shale development has triggered $20 billion to $24 billion in spending investments and more will come, reports the Akron Beacon Journal’s online edition. The newspaper cites an unreleased report by Ohio state geologist Mike McCormac that says drilling companies have spent about $6 billion on drilling plus approximately $2 billion on leases. Investments in processing plants and pipelines are estimated at $12 billion to $16 billion.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  labor-unions  economic-growth  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 11, 2014

For American workers the more-than-five-year wait for the Keystone XL pipeline is personal. Make that very personal.

During a press conference with other union leaders and API President and CEO Jack Gerard, Laborers International Union of North America President Terry O’Sullivan said the construction sector is saddled with 12.8 percent unemployment, with nearly 1 million out of work. So every one of the 42,000 jobs the U.S. State Department estimates the Keystone XL would create during its construction phase is highly prized.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  job-growth  economic-growth  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 25, 2014

The energy industry is working for America. A new Manhattan Institute report finds that in the slowly recovering U.S. economy the oil and natural gas industry is creating jobs and generating broad economic stimulus. Top findings:

  • While overall U.S. employment has yet to return levels predating the 2008 recession, the number of oil and natural gas jobs has grown 40 percent since then.
  • The U.S. energy revolution is almost entirely the result of development by more than 20,000 small and midsize businesses. The typical oil and natural gas firm has fewer than 15 employees.
  • Industry jobs are geographically dispersed. Sixteen states have more than 150,000 jobs in the oil and natural gas sector.

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job-creation  economic-growth  keystone-xl-pipeline  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 21, 2014

It’s hard to look at the delays that have kept the Keystone XL pipeline on the drawing board for more than five years and not think about the countless American workers – in construction, fabrication, supply, transport and other sectors – who would be helped by the project finally getting under way. People like Billy Rogers.   

We met Rogers last year and he spoke about how a large, shovel-ready infrastructure project like the Keystone XL benefits working men and women. He knew this full well, being among 5,000 U.S. workers building Keystone XL’s southern leg, Gulf Coast Pipeline in Texas and Oklahoma:

“Working on the Gulf Coast Project has afforded me a good income that allows me to support my family. In addition, the construction of this project has had a significant impact in the local communities in which we work as the hundreds of crew members spend their money locally in restaurants, grocery stores, shops – everyone is benefiting.” 

Our economy needs more good-news stories like Rogers’ – as many as possible.

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