The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  jobs  economy  pennsylvania  new-york  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 23, 2014

Earlier this week we focused on the job and economic impacts of energy in New York state, a good story that could be much better if the state would permit safe and responsible development of natural gas from shale. How much better is suggested by the dramatic increases in natural gas production in neighboring Pennsylvania, as depicted in this chart by the U.S. Energy Information Administration:

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american-energy  economy  jobs  energy-security  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 18, 2014

Oil production and natural gas production from the six prominent shale basins in the United States should increase in May, a U.S. drilling report said. The U.S. Energy Information Administration issued a monthly drilling report for the six shale basins -- Bakken, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Marcellus, Niobrara and Permian -- that together account for almost 90 percent of the growth in U.S. oil production and nearly all of the gains in natural gas.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  energy-security  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 17, 2014

New national polling finds strong support among U.S. registered voters for more domestic oil and natural gas production and more investment in energy infrastructure – with significant majorities connecting increased energy infrastructure (such as new pipelines, storage facilities and other energy-related projects) with job creation, strengthening U.S. energy security and helping American consumers.

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trade  energy-security  american-energy  economy  ohio  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 14, 2014

The Hill (Rep. Pete Olson): The Great Recession that began at the end of this last decade has lingered like few others in recent history. Job growth has been sluggish, and unemployment numbers have ticked up only marginally, making this a painfully slow recovery. This is true in almost all sectors—except for energy. There, job growth has been nothing short of explosive. American innovation has allowed us to tap into energy resources previously off-limits and unreachable, creating jobs across the country.

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american-energy  imports  emissions  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 10, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: U.S. crude oil proved reserves rose for the fourth consecutive year in 2012, increasing by 15% to 33 billion barrels, according to the U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves (2012) report released April 10 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves were the highest since 1976, and the 2012 increase of 4.5 billion barrels was the largest annual increase since 1970, when 10 billion barrels of Alaskan crude oil were added to U.S. proved reserves. Contributing factors to higher crude oil reserves include increased exploration for liquid hydrocarbons, improved technology for developing tight oil plays, and sustained high historical crude oil prices.

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american-energy  energy-security  fracking  exports  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 9, 2014

Wall Street Journal: The global energy equation has changed dramatically in recent years, thanks in large part to the impact of the shale-gas revolution. To get a handle on how the expectations of huge gas exports may shape the geopolitical future, The Wall Street Journal's John Bussey talked to Daniel Yergin, author and Vice Chairman of IHS Inc. Edited excerpts of their conversation follow.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  economy  energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 8, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: The oil and gas boom brought about by new drilling technology is drawing people to shale plays like iron filings to magnets.New census data show a population surge as the oil boom draws workers and families to oil fields around the country. Some of the nation's fastest-growing communities include Midland and Odessa in the Permian Basin and three cities near North Dakota's Bakken Shale field: Williston, Dickinson and Minot. The rapid increase in drilling in the Eagle Ford Shale has spilled into San Antonio.

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energy-security  american-energy  imports  fracking  jobs  economy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 2, 2014

Total U.S. net imports of energy, measured in terms of energy content, declined in 2013 to their lowest level in more than two decades. Growth in the production of oil and natural gas displaced imports and supported increased petroleum product exports, driving most of the decline. A large drop in energy imports together with a smaller increase in energy exports led to a 19% decrease in net energy imports from 2012 to 2013.

Total energy imports declined faster—down 9% from 2012 to 2013—than in the previous year, while export growth slowed. Crude oil production grew 15%, about the same pace as in 2012, which led imports of crude oil to decrease by 12%, accounting for much of the overall decline in imports.

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  fracking  texas  oklahoma  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 31, 2014

Over the past few years, the U.S. has witnessed a dramatic turnaround in its energy situation. Thanks largely to a combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," energy producers have been able to tap vast oil and gas deposits buried in deep shale formations. As a result, domestic oil and gas production has surged to multi-decade highs.

This energy boom has yielded tremendous and widespread economic benefits to the United States. A statement from the White House Council of Economic Advisors last year summed it up nicely: "Every barrel of oil or cubic foot of gas that we produce at home instead of importing abroad means more jobs, faster growth, and a lower trade deficit." Let's take a closer look at some of the main ways the energy boom has helped the nation's economy.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  lng-exports  manufacturing  texas  ohio 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 28, 2014

The nation's energy boom, stoked by technological advances both onshore and offshore, drove significant economic growth for the oil and gas industry, which also fueled a corresponding population boom in resource-rich areas such as North Dakota and Texas between 2007 and 2012, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The bureau's Economic Census Advance Report, released Wednesday, provides the first comprehensive look at the U.S. economy since the Great Recession, supplying data on a series of key metrics across more than 1,000 industries. The report comes out every five years.

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