The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2014

The Christian Science Monitor: Although North Dakota, Texas, and the Gulf of Mexico are known for producing much of the US's oil, other states are becoming bigger producers. Alaska and California are two states that are gaining footing in the oil industry.

The US has succeeded in lifting its oil production to over 8 million barrels per day, the highest levels in decades. But where exactly is all that oil coming from?

The answer for the last several years has been the Bakken field in North Dakota and the Eagle Ford in Texas. Those two regions are principally responsible for the surge in oil production.

But in April 2014, North Dakota surpassed the 1 million barrel per day mark – a milestone for a state that was producing fewer than 200,000 barrels per day just five years ago.

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 24, 2014

Smithsonian.com Magazine: The shale gas boom, spurred by fracking and horizontal drilling, is bigger than anyone thought it would be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, natural gas derived from shale now makes up a full half of U.S. natural gas production, says Scientific American. Shale gas wasn't supposed to make up such a large portion of our gas supply for another ten to twenty years.

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ohio  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  shale-energy  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2014

Thanks to the Utica Shale, Ohio is emerging as a key energy state. This post features a photo essay on the Energy From Shale website, showing some of the scenes from the heart of the Utica – where jobs are being created and whole communities are being reinvigorated.

In Ohio as in other shale energy states, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling is unlocking vast reserves of oil and natural gas. It’s a revolution that’s the main reason the U.S. is now the world’s leading natural gas producer and could become the world’s leading oil producer by next year. 

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american-energy  jobs  economy  energy-security  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  innovation  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 23, 2014

CNBC (U.S. Rep. Fred Upton): Millions of vacationing families will be hitting the highways this summer where, for the fourth year in a row, they'll face gas prices above $3.50 a gallon. Prices are already closing in on $4 a gallon, and the political upheaval in Iraq threatens to push them even higher. Costly fill-ups may seem like the new normal, but they do not have to be. The right energy policies can help ease future pain at the pump, as well as on the monthly electric bill, and for goods on store shelves. Even better, these policies can create new jobs in the process. Indeed, we can unleash the benefits of the American energy superpower — but only if the Obama administration embraces our potential.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  colorado  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  shale-benefits  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 19, 2014

Check out a new photo essay from Weld County, Colo., that just went up on the Energy From Shale website, showing some of the scenes and workers involved in oil and natural gas development in that state. Click on the link and scroll down until you find the photo gallery.

The collection illustrates some of the significant energy development going on in Colorado, a state with a long history of oil and natural gas production. The first well in the Denver-Julesburg basin was drilled in 1881.

Weld County is where a good deal of today’s production is going on – and along with it job creation, economic growth and opportunity for people who live there and beyond.

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shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  fuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 17, 2014

Bloomberg: North America’s dominance of global exports of refined fuels will expand to unprecedented levels by 2019 as the shale revolution makes U.S. refineries more competitive, the International Energy Agency said.

The continent will become a “titan of unprecedented proportions” and its oil refineries will export about 3.5 million barrels a day by the end of the decade, the Paris-based adviser to 29 oil-consuming nations said in a report today. North America’s imports of crude will be 2.6 million.

“Less than ten years ago, the United States was the world’s largest importer of refined products,” the IEA said in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report, which forecasts energy-market trends. “Today it has become the world’s largest liquids producer, ahead of Saudi Arabia and Russia, as well as its largest product exporter.”

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  global-energy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 13, 2014

Business Insider: Brent oil futures briefly began approaching $115 this morning, the highest level in nine months, as fears that Iraq is disintegrating spooked markets.

Crude is now up about 4% on the week. When prices stay at this level for this long, U.S. gas prices start creeping up. 

But what about all the oil the U.S. has been producing the last few years? Shouldn't we be insulated from whatever oil is doing?

Unfortunately, the answer is no. Gasoline prices are set on the global market, and refiners everywhere ship product to wherever they can get the best quote. So for better or worse, raw gasoline prices mostly move in lockstep around the world. The primary contract for gasoline is called RBOB. 

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 11, 2014

Fuel Fix.com: U.S. natural gas output will reach 73 billion cubic feet a day for the first time this year as new pipelines tap into shale supplies stranded in the Marcellus formation in the Northeast, a government report showed.

Marketed gas output in the lower 48 states will increase 4 percent from 2013, setting a record for the fourth straight year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Short-Term Energy Outlook, released Tuesday in Washington. The production estimate was raised from 72.26 billion in last month’s report as “several new projects to support Marcellus production have either recently come on line or will begin operations later this year,” the government said.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  methane-emissions  access  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2014

New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman’s Sunday piece highlighted a conversation he had a few weeks ago with President Obama, during which the president talked about energy and climate change. A few things stand out:

Realistic Policy

The president signaled that climate policy should consider the real-world roles that are being played by various energy sources, saying:

“… we’re not going to suddenly turn off a switch and suddenly we’re no longer using fossil fuels, but we have to use this time wisely, so that you have a tapering off of fossil fuels replaced by clean energy sources that are not releasing carbon.”

Sounds reasonable, given the forecast of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook – that fossil fuels’ share of total U.S. energy use will be 80 percent in 2040, down only slightly from where it was in 2012 (82 percent). Oil and natural gas, which supplied 63 percent of the energy we used in 2012, are projected to supply 61 percent in 2040. Oil and natural gas are America’s energy today and tomorrow. 

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natural-gas-development  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-sands  innovation  pipeline-construction 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2014

New York Times: DENVER — An impassioned national debate over the oil-production technique known as fracking is edging toward the ballot box in Colorado, opening an election-year rift between moderate, energy-friendly Democrats and environmentalists who want to rein in drilling or give local communities the power to outlaw it altogether.

If they make the ballot in November, an array of proposals will be among the first in the nation to ask a state’s voters to sharply limit energy development. Some measures would keep drilling as far as a half-mile from Colorado homes. Others would give individual communities the right to ban fracking.

The ballot measures reflect the anxieties that have accompanied a drilling boom across the West. As drilling sites are built closer to playgrounds and suburban homes in communities along Colorado’s northern plains, residents and environmental groups have called for more regulation and have pushed for moratoriums on drilling.

But in a bellwether state like Colorado, where views on drilling vary as much as the geography, the measures could ignite an all-out battle involving oil companies, business groups and conservationists that pulls in millions in outside money, sets off a rush of campaign ads and spawns lawsuits for years to come. That is why Gov. John W. Hickenlooper and other Democratic leaders are working feverishly on a compromise that would give communities more control of energy development in their backyards while keeping the fracking issue off the ballot.

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