The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  regulation  safe-operations  shale-benefits  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2014

North Carolina is about to join America’s energy revolution. This week the state’s Mining and Energy Commissions (MEC) conducted the first of four scheduled public hearings on proposed hydraulic fracturing regulations, the final adoption of which could allow fracking as early as next spring.

The MEC hearings mark the close of a two-year process to lift a 2012 moratorium on hydraulic fracturing in North Carolina. The presence of vast shale reserves and the marriage of safe, responsible hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched the U.S. energy revolution – with stunning results. The U.S. is now the world’s leading natural gas producer and could become No. 1 in oil output next year, according to the International Energy Agency – generating thousands of new jobs and boosting the national economy.

While North Carolina doesn’t have energy-bearing shale deposits as large as those in Texas, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and other states, it has enough to create jobs and help its economy.

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alternative-energy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  ethanol  fuels  economy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted July 28, 2014

CNBC: Move over ExxonMobilChevron and ConocoPhillipsthere's a new "Big Three" in U.S. energy production. And they're not companies.

In a new update to its drilling productivity report from last week, the Energy Information Agency said North Dakota's Bakken and Texas' Permian Basin and Eagle Ford Shale are quietly generating more than a million barrels of oil per day each–comprising at least a third of total U.S. daily oil production. Shale oil drilling generated the equivalent of nearly 90 percent of the U.S.'s total energy needs in 2013, according to EIA figures.

Mark Perry, an economist at the University of Michigan and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, crunched the EIA's numbers even further. His analysis suggests the output of the combined three oil fields is actually exceeding 4 million bpd, which would make them the world's fifth largest oil producer by volume.

"In all of human history, there have only been ten oil fields in the world that have ever reached the one million barrel per day milestone," the economist wrote in a recent blog post. "Three of those ten are now active in the US–thanks to the advanced drilling techniques that started accessing oceans of shale oil in Texas and North Dakota about five years ago."

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api-standards-program  industry-standards  energy-development  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas  government-revenue  community  exploratory-well 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted July 9, 2014

Hydraulic fracturing is a proven, safe technique that has been used since 1949 in over one million wells right here in the U.S. As a result, America is now the number one producer of natural gas in the world, and by 2015, it is expected that we will take the top spot in crude oil production. Of course, with this success, come both benefits and challenges.

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energy-development  fracking  hydrofracking  hydraulic-fracturing  new-york  natural-gas-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2014

Oh, New York. As if your six-year-old moratorium on hydraulic fracturing – an unforced error that’s costing thousands of jobs and dynamic growth – isn’t bad enough for your economy, now there’s a court ruling extending the opportunity for dubious policymaking to the local level, potentially impacting state residents who can least afford it.

This week’s decision by the state Court of Appeals, that towns and municipalities may ban hydraulic fracturing within their borders, looms as a new frustrating turn for landowners. Especially those in the Southern Tier, an economically starved belt of counties along the Pennsylvania border.  

It’s hard to see how energy development – that could save family farms, provide good career paths for the region’s young people and boost the regional economy – wouldn’t be chilled by the prospect of a string of localized bans. For New York property owners, the ruling could mean that economic development will continue to be something that happens in Pennsylvania, not at home.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2014

The Christian Science Monitor: Although North Dakota, Texas, and the Gulf of Mexico are known for producing much of the US's oil, other states are becoming bigger producers. Alaska and California are two states that are gaining footing in the oil industry.

The US has succeeded in lifting its oil production to over 8 million barrels per day, the highest levels in decades. But where exactly is all that oil coming from?

The answer for the last several years has been the Bakken field in North Dakota and the Eagle Ford in Texas. Those two regions are principally responsible for the surge in oil production.

But in April 2014, North Dakota surpassed the 1 million barrel per day mark – a milestone for a state that was producing fewer than 200,000 barrels per day just five years ago.

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 24, 2014

Smithsonian.com Magazine: The shale gas boom, spurred by fracking and horizontal drilling, is bigger than anyone thought it would be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, natural gas derived from shale now makes up a full half of U.S. natural gas production, says Scientific American. Shale gas wasn't supposed to make up such a large portion of our gas supply for another ten to twenty years.

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ohio  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  shale-energy  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2014

Thanks to the Utica Shale, Ohio is emerging as a key energy state. This post features a photo essay on the Energy From Shale website, showing some of the scenes from the heart of the Utica – where jobs are being created and whole communities are being reinvigorated.

In Ohio as in other shale energy states, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling is unlocking vast reserves of oil and natural gas. It’s a revolution that’s the main reason the U.S. is now the world’s leading natural gas producer and could become the world’s leading oil producer by next year. 

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american-energy  jobs  economy  energy-security  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  innovation  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 23, 2014

CNBC (U.S. Rep. Fred Upton): Millions of vacationing families will be hitting the highways this summer where, for the fourth year in a row, they'll face gas prices above $3.50 a gallon. Prices are already closing in on $4 a gallon, and the political upheaval in Iraq threatens to push them even higher. Costly fill-ups may seem like the new normal, but they do not have to be. The right energy policies can help ease future pain at the pump, as well as on the monthly electric bill, and for goods on store shelves. Even better, these policies can create new jobs in the process. Indeed, we can unleash the benefits of the American energy superpower — but only if the Obama administration embraces our potential.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  colorado  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  shale-benefits  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 19, 2014

Check out a new photo essay from Weld County, Colo., that just went up on the Energy From Shale website, showing some of the scenes and workers involved in oil and natural gas development in that state. Click on the link and scroll down until you find the photo gallery.

The collection illustrates some of the significant energy development going on in Colorado, a state with a long history of oil and natural gas production. The first well in the Denver-Julesburg basin was drilled in 1881.

Weld County is where a good deal of today’s production is going on – and along with it job creation, economic growth and opportunity for people who live there and beyond.

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shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  fuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 17, 2014

Bloomberg: North America’s dominance of global exports of refined fuels will expand to unprecedented levels by 2019 as the shale revolution makes U.S. refineries more competitive, the International Energy Agency said.

The continent will become a “titan of unprecedented proportions” and its oil refineries will export about 3.5 million barrels a day by the end of the decade, the Paris-based adviser to 29 oil-consuming nations said in a report today. North America’s imports of crude will be 2.6 million.

“Less than ten years ago, the United States was the world’s largest importer of refined products,” the IEA said in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report, which forecasts energy-market trends. “Today it has become the world’s largest liquids producer, ahead of Saudi Arabia and Russia, as well as its largest product exporter.”

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