The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

epa-regulation  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  economic-growth  innovation  government 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 27, 2014

Ever heard of the broken window fallacy? In economic circles, it’s a common parable used to dismiss arguments that damage – like the breaking of a window – has a silver lining: spending to fix the window boosts the window repairman, which boosts the folks who make panes of glass and so forth.

Yet, that argument (and the one depicted in the broken window parable) misses a big unseen – there’s no free lunch in spending to repair or rebuild property. The money comes from somewhere. The person who must buy a new window spends money he or she might have invested or spent elsewhere in the economy, with greater economic impact. Likewise with government spending. Those dollars came from taxpayers who might have invested or spent elsewhere in the economy, with greater economic impact.

We say all of this because another common argument being heard is that tossing bricks of energy regulation will invigorate the energy sector.

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north-carolina  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  offshore-energy-development  outer-continental-shelf  seismic-survey  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 8, 2014

Energy already is generating benefits for North Carolina and its economy, and things could get a lot better with the right oil and natural gas policies in place – an important point as North Carolinians get ready to vote in a U.S. Senate race that has national implications.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling could get under way early next year with the finalizing of state rules for safe and responsible development.  

This fits with recent polling showing that strong majorities of registered North Carolina voters support increased domestic oil and natural gas production, including 91 percent who say more production could lead to more U.S. jobs and 89 percent who say more oil and gas could help stimulate the economy.

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oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  unconventional-oil  unconventional-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  economic-growth  government-revenues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2014

There’s more evidence that the U.S. oil and natural gas industry is driving economic growth – not just in the industry itself, but also in the vast supply chain that sustains energy development – adding to overall GDP, wages and revenues to government.

A new IHS study, commissioned by the Energy Equipment & Infrastructure Alliance (EEIA) estimates that employment growth in the supply chain that supports unconventional oil and natural gas development – that is, energy from shale and other tight-rock formations with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – will outpace, by a more than a 2-to-1 margin, the U.S. average from 2012 to 2025.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  economic-growth  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2014

This week the Keystone XL pipeline reaches a dubious anniversary – six years waiting for the Obama administration to approve a shovel-ready, privately financed infrastructure project that would create jobs while strengthening America’s energy, economic and national security.

It has been an unfortunate, unnecessary wait. Such projects historically are approved by Washington in one to two years. In the six years Keystone XL has been left on hold by this White House, 10,000 miles of oil and natural gas pipelines have been built in the United States.

While Keystone XL languishes, Canada – our neighbor, friend and largest supplier of imported oil – gets the cold shoulder from an administration that has dithered, delayed and dumbfounded its way into obstructing a vital piece of energy infrastructure – pleasing a small minority instead of advancing the national interest.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  shale-benefits  economic-growth  manufacturing  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 16, 2014

Steve LeVine (Quartz): Oil prices continue to plunge today despite the beheading of another western hostage by the Islamic State, tensions between Russia and the West, and mayhem in Libya. As Quartz has reported, one of the main reasons is surging US oil production, which has made up for supply disruption almost barrel for barrel—and is also a bad sign for the leaders of petrostates.

Now we have an estimate of where oil prices might have been absent the American oil boom—a sobering $150 a barrel, former BP CEO Tony Hayward told the Financial Times (paywall).

That’s 55% higher than the current benchmark price of $96.27 that was trading in Asia this morning. If Hayward’s number is right, it means that the US boom is saving the global economy about $4.9 billion a day in oil spending.

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oil-and-natural-gas-investments  infrastructure  job-creation  economic-growth  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2014

It’s one thing to talk about energizing the U.S. economy, it’s another to walk the talk. America’s oil and natural gas industry is doing that, with four companies ranked in the top 10 of the Progressive Policy Institute’s list of leaders in U.S. capital spending in 2013.

ExxonMobil ($11.07 billion), Chevron ($10.56 billion), ConocoPhillips ($6.35 billion) and Occidental Petroleum ($5.5 billion) ranked in the top 10 in U.S. capital spending – expenditures for plants, property and equipment. Also significant: The same four are in the top 10 of cumulative U.S. capital spending over the three years (2011-2013) PPI has compiled its “investment heroes” list.

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energy-policies  oil-and-natural-gas-development  louisiana  louisiana-oil-gas-association  economic-growth  offshore-development  onshore-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 11, 2014

Interesting energy discussion this week from New Orleans at a town hall event hosted by The Atlantic – where the focus was on infrastructure, jobs and economic growth, and the need for sensible, bipartisan energy policymaking.

There was no better place for such a conversation and certainly no better time – with our ongoing domestic energy revolution lifting the United States to global energy superpower status: No. 1 in natural gas production and expected to be No. 1 in oil production next year. This development is helping drive the economy forward, creating jobs, opportunity and greater U.S. energy security. Indeed, energy’s national economic impact is seen in a new survey of the 30,000 businesses, in every state and the District of Columbia, that support domestic energy development.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  job-creation  economic-growth  pennsylvania  utah  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 5, 2014

Ultimately, America’s energy revolution is what we choose to make of it – through the policy strategies and actions taken by our leaders and governments. Thanks to hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the United States is enjoying an energy boom – the harnessing of vast reserves of oil and natural gas that power our economy and enable modern lifestyles. Will that revolution be sustained and expanded? That’s America’s energy choice.

On energy, policy matters. During a speech on the impacts of federal energy policy at this week’s Uintah Basin Energy Summit in Salt Lake City, API President and CEO Jack Gerard said America’s energy renaissance is revitalizing some parts of the country while others are being made to wait for energy benefits because of “backward and shortsighted” policy from Washington.

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crude-oil  exports  economic-growth  oil-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 4, 2014

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is making headlines this week with a speech from Mexico calling for stronger economic ties between the two countries and actions to sustain what he called the “North American energy renaissance” – including lifting the decades-old ban on exporting U.S. crude oil. Christie:

“For all of North America, the energy revolution has improved our strategic and competitive position. But the revolution remains in its infancy. And whether North America realizes the full potential of its energy opportunity will be the result of more than just luck and natural bounty, it will also be driven by the policy choices and investments we must make. … The 1970s-era ban on crude exports creates a price anomaly which holds U.S. crude oil at a discounted price, which ultimately hurts upstream production and limits the energy boom.”

Christie’s remarks parallel what others are saying about ending the domestic crude oil export ban.

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  afl-cio  access  american-petroleum-institute  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 28, 2014

Despite the hyper-partisanship currently flourishing in Washington, there is a potential tie that binds: American energy.

Thanks to advanced technologies, entrepreneurial risk-taking and abundant oil and natural gas reserves, U.S. energy is on the rise: We’re the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and likely to be No. 1 in crude oil production next year, according to the International Energy Agency. Our energy revolution is creating jobs, boosting the economy and increasing America’s energy security and influence in the world. It’s also a bridge to bipartisanship.

API Executive Vice President Louis Finkel touched on these themes in a recent op-ed for the Reno Gazette-Journaland in a presentation before the Nevada state convention of the AFL-CIO. 

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