The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  trade  deficit  jobs  economy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  regulations  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 4, 2013

A Pivotal Moment in U.S. Energy History

Global Energy Initiative (Jason Bordoff):  We are at a transformational moment in energy history. Just a few years ago, all energy projections forecast increased imports, increased scarcity, and increased natural gas prices. Today, we’ve shifted from scarcity to abundance. U.S. oil production has increased by 2.5 million barrels per day (B/D) since 2010. This year, the United States overtook Saudi Arabia as the largest producer of liquid fuels (including crude oil, natural gas, and biofuels) in the world. U.S. oil imports are at their lowest level in 25 years and are projected to continue declining. The natural gas outlook is even more striking. New geological surveys and production data continue to surprise to the upside. And multi-billion-dollar terminals proposed not long ago to import natural gas are being flipped to export instead.

This transformation is not only a U.S. story. New technologies mean that what were once challenging sources of oil and gas can now be tapped economically from the oil sands in Canada (and potentially Venezuela), the ultra-deepwater “presalt” off the coast of Brazil, and many other parts of the world. Iraq, parts of Africa, and elsewhere are poised for sharp increases in production.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gk7ms9

Read More

lng-exports  jobs  economy  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 21, 2013

The Strange Debate over LNG Exports

UPI Analysis:  WASHINGTON, Nov. 21 -- The debate over exports of U.S. liquefied natural gas is exceedingly strange. In Washington one sometimes hears calls to limit imports of given goods or services but limits on exports?

When U.S. President Barack Obama talked of doubling U.S. exports in five years in his 2010 State of the Union Address, some said this was an unrealistic objective but nobody said it wasn't a worthy goal, particularly to support the United States' economic recovery.

Since Adam Smith, of course, economists have understood that restrictions on imports or exports reduce overall national welfare. But the politics of imports and exports are different.

The costs of allowing imports are generally borne by identifiable firms and their workers but the benefits of imports are typically widely dispersed and thus effectively invisible.

Exports have an opposite dynamic. Increased export sales directly benefit identifiable firms and their workers. Any costs are typically spread thinly and invisibly over the whole economy.
 
Read more: http://bit.ly/1h5umeF

Read More

lng-exports  natural-gas-benefits  job-creation  trade  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2013

Earlier this year an ICF International study found that exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) would have dramatic national impacts on jobs, economic growth and revenue generation for government.  Now a second ICF study shows what the impact of LNG exports would look like on a state-by-state basis. They’re huge:

  • LNG exports could contribute as much as $10 billion to $31 billion per state to the economies of natural gas-producing states such as Texas, Louisiana and Pennsylvania by 2035.
  • Producing states could see employment gains as high as 60,000 to 155,000 jobs in 2035.
  • Non-producing states also will benefit, partly because of the demand for steel, cement, equipment and other goods used in natural gas development. ICF said states including Ohio, California, New York and Illinois will see gains to their economies as high as $2.6 billion to $5 billion per state in 2035.
  • In terms of jobs, large manufacturing states like California and Ohio will see gains of 30,000 to 38,000 in 2035, ICF says.

Read More

fracking  job-creation  lng-exports  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2013

Congratulations America. You’re (Almost) Energy Independent

Politico Magazine (Daniel Yergin): For four decades, whenever the American political debate turned to energy, the discussion was all about shortage and scarcity, a reality that haunted the United States ever since the global oil crises of the 1970s.

That conversation is over.

And now the unconventional energy revolution—newly accessible supplies of shale gas and oil—is creating a new discourse on energy that is changing politics and policies. All of this represents what Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz calls a “new mentality” about America’s energy position, with a new political language to match.

Read More

liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  job-creation  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 8, 2013

When President Obama talks about creating jobs, growing the economy, expanding exports of U.S. goods and strengthening the middle class, as he did Friday in New Orleans, most Americans are with him. And so is the oil and natural gas industry. As he said in April, creating jobs and opportunity for Americans should be our “true North.”

The president used Friday’s speech to make the case that needed improvements to the nation’s infrastructure – roads, bridges, ports and more – is a path to increased prosperity.

Read More

hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 5, 2013

America’s Resurgence in Manufacturing Starts in the Shale Fields

Forbes: Our economy is straining at the bit to grow out of the Great Recession. You wouldn’t know that from the dreary news on both the jobs and GDP growth front. The good news is found in the incredible potential for high-paying jobs, growth and wealth creation bubbling up in America’s manufacturing sector.

Manufacturing is hot, even though we’re supposed to be in a post-industrial economy. The transformation in American manufacturing today is redolent of a century ago when innovation and growth in the industrial landscape was blossoming in both big companies and start-ups…

The dramatic growth in U.S. oil and gas production has not arisen from new discoveries or the opening of off-limits federal lands, but from new technologies and techniques that literally manufacture liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons from solid shale rock. Widely reported as “fracking” – hydraulic fracturing – the story is in fact one of deep industrial innovation, digital technologies and software. In other words, it is a secular shift in the industrial landscape.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1hgVN6i

Read More

economy  jobs  energy-security  hydraulic-fracturing  engineers  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 23, 2013

Marcellus Shale Gas Growing Faster than Expected

Wall Street Journal: PITTSBURGH — Natural gas production from the Marcellus Shale region is growing faster than expected, according to a new federal report issued Tuesday.

Marcellus production has now reached 12 billion cubic feet a day, the Energy Information Administration report found. That's the energy equivalent of about 2 million barrels of oil a day, and more than six times the 2009 production rate.

For perspective, if the Marcellus Shale region were a country, its natural gas production would rank eighth in the world. The Marcellus now produces more natural gas than Saudi Arabia, and that glut has led to wholesale prices here that are about one-quarter of those in Japan, for example.
 
Read more: http://on.wsj.com/1cedUYl

Read More

hydraulic-fracturing  energy-security  american-energy  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 17, 2013

U.S. is the World’s Largest Producer of Natural Gas – Here’s What That Means  

NPR: Natural gas production in the U.S. is going through the roof. The U.S. now produces more natural gas than any country on Earth, according to a recent report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

This is largely due to fracking, the controversial method for using pressurized fluids to break up rocks to get at the natural gas below. Over the past few years, fracking has had a huge effect on energy in America. Here's how.

Read more: http://n.pr/H6tGpA

Read More

ethanol  blend-wall  renewable-fuel-standard  american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 11, 2013

Analysis: Lawsuits Likely as EPA Declares U.S. Ethanol Blend Wall a ‘Reality’

Reuters: With two words, the U.S. environment regulator may be handing oil refiners the biggest win of a long battle to beat back the seemingly inexorable rise of ethanol fuel.

In a leaked proposal that would significantly scale back biofuel blending requirements next year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says the blend wall - the 10 percent threshold of ethanol-mixed gasoline that is at the crux of the lobbying war - is an "important reality".

The agency's rationale for a cut in the volume of ethanol that must be blended echoes an argument the oil industry has been making for months: the U.S. fuel chain cannot absorb more ethanol.

Read more: http://reut.rs/1hIy6OU

Read More

economy  jobs  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 10, 2013

Check out API’s new web-based interactive map that can be used to track U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) export projects, including those waiting for federal approval.  The map shows the location of the proposed projects, and clicking on the respective balloons opens a window with detailed information about the project’s export capacity, jobs that could be created, capital investment and more. Shrink the map down a bit and you can see proposed international LNG export projects.

Read More