The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  economic-security  labor-unions  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 24, 2014

Americans support building the Keystone XL pipeline. A new Harris Poll shows that by nearly a 4-to-1 margin Americans agree the pipeline is in the national interest. By continuing to put off a decision on Keystone XL, the Obama administration is casting its lot with the 1. On this issue, a lonely number indeed. API’s Cindy Schild, during a conference call with reporters:

“Friday’s announcement by the administration seems to dismiss not only congressional support but American support as well. President Obama and his advisers have apparently determined to put their political interests over the national interest and side with a small group of activists led by a billionaire instead of the labor community and the vast majority of ordinary Americans, regardless of harm to the middle class.”

For all the talk from this administration about building up the middle class, its lack of action on Keystone XL is hurting middle-class Americans.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy  energy-security  environment  fracking  california 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 24, 2014

Washington Post: If foot-dragging were a competitive sport, President Obama and his administration would be world champions for their performance in delaying the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline.

 

Last Friday afternoon, the time when officials make announcements they hope no one will notice, the State Department declared that it is putting off a decision on Keystone XL indefinitely — or at least, it seems, well past November’s midterm elections. This time, the excuse is litigation in Nebraska over the proposed route, because that might lead to a change in the project that various federal agencies will want to consider. The State Department might even decide to substantially restart the environmental review process. This is yet another laughable reason to delay a project that the federal government has been scrutinizing for more than five years.

Read More

american-energy  jobs  fracking  california  texas  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 23, 2014

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released new data yesterday on international energy production for the months of November and December 2013. For the 14th straight month starting in November 2012, total petroleum production (including crude oil and other petroleum products like natural gas plant liquids, lease condensate, and refined petroleum products) in “Saudi America” during the month of December at 13 million barrels per day (bpd) exceeded Saudi Arabia’s output at 11.65 million bpd (see chart above).

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  jobs  energy-security  fracking  manufacturing  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 21, 2014

Forbes (Christopher Helman): Whenever businesses and bureaucrats don’t have the guts to stand behind a decision they’ve made, they release the news late on a Friday. In the case of the Obama administration’s move to delay indefinitely a decision to approve or deny the Keystone XL pipeline, it speaks volumes that the announcement was made not just on any Friday, but on the convergence of Good Friday and Passover.

Read More

trade  energy-security  american-energy  economy  ohio  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 14, 2014

The Hill (Rep. Pete Olson): The Great Recession that began at the end of this last decade has lingered like few others in recent history. Job growth has been sluggish, and unemployment numbers have ticked up only marginally, making this a painfully slow recovery. This is true in almost all sectors—except for energy. There, job growth has been nothing short of explosive. American innovation has allowed us to tap into energy resources previously off-limits and unreachable, creating jobs across the country.

Read More

american-energy  fracking  jobs  economy  energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 8, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: The oil and gas boom brought about by new drilling technology is drawing people to shale plays like iron filings to magnets.New census data show a population surge as the oil boom draws workers and families to oil fields around the country. Some of the nation's fastest-growing communities include Midland and Odessa in the Permian Basin and three cities near North Dakota's Bakken Shale field: Williston, Dickinson and Minot. The rapid increase in drilling in the Eagle Ford Shale has spilled into San Antonio.

Read More

domestic-production  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  water-management  oil-and-natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2014

U.S. Energy Boom Lifts Low-Income Workers Too

Wall Street Journal op-ed (subscription required): Mayors, governors and economic-development officials love natural-resource jobs—and today's North American energy revolution has been providing a lot of them. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of new jobs in the oil and gas industry (technically a part of mining) increased by roughly 270,000 between 2003 and 2012. This is an increase of about 92% compared with a 3% increase in all jobs during the same period.

The people of New York and other states that have so far declined to take part in the boom might like to know what they are missing because these jobs pay well. The BLS reports that the U.S. average annual wage (which excludes employer-paid benefits) in the oil and gas industry was about $107,200 during 2012, the latest full year available. That's more than double the average of $49,300 for all workers.

At the other end of the wage spectrum are waiters and waitresses in food services nationwide earning about $16,200 a year, workers in the accommodations industry with average pay of $27,300, and those in the retail trade with average wages of $27,700. But the evidence from the oil boom regions is that energy development lifts wages for low-income workers too.

Read More

economy  fracking  lng-exports  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 1, 2014

With Europe’s dependence on Russian gas impeding diplomatic efforts, it’s time to reconsider outdated policies that are keeping the U.S. from becoming an energy exporter.

U.S. lawmakers don’t drive around in 1970s-era cars, yet they don’t seem to mind energy policies that are equally out of date. Attempts to export shale oil and gas, for example, have run smack into legal and regulatory barriers as old as a Gran Torino.

Energy companies have been urging Congress to lift the lid on exports and start treating oil and gas again like any other commodity that’s freely traded in world markets. Tapping global demand for U.S. shale oil and gas, they say, will spur domestic production and create even more jobs in a sector that’s already racked up robust employment gains.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  canada  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 28, 2014

The Keystone XL pipeline has been delayed by Washington way too long – more than five years and counting – but we haven’t lost our sense of humor.

At a Vets4Energy event supporting the Keystone XL, Gary Doer, Canada’s ambassador to the United States, recognizing the U.S. military veterans in the audience, remarked that the two countries are old friends. “Ever since the War of 1812 we’ve been allies together,” said Doer, noting the little war during which Canada helped the British. “I won’t get into that war, but …”

U.S. Sen. John Hoeven of North Dakota good-naturedly cut him off: “We won that war!”

Read More

economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  global-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 27, 2014

Associated Press: WASHINGTON -- America's cities are still growing, with the population boom fueled by people picking up and moving to find jobs in energy production across the oil- and gas-rich areas west of the Mississippi River.

New 2013 census information released Thursday shows that cities are the fastest-growing parts of the United States, and a majority of the metro areas showing that growth are located in or near the oil- and gas-rich fields of the Great Plains and Mountain West.

Neighboring cities Odessa and Midland, Texas, show up as the second and third fastest-growing metro areas in the country. Sara Higgins, the Midland public information officer, has a simple explanation: oil. "They're coming here to work," Higgins said.

Energy production is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States, the Census Bureau said. The boom in the U.S. follows the use of new technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, to tap oil and gas reserves.

Read More