The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl  infrastructure  american-made-energy  canadian-oil-sands  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 18, 2014

While the U.S. Senate fell just short of the votes needed to pass legislation advancing the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline, the issue likely will reach President Obama’s desk when the new Congress is seated in January. API President and CEO Jack Gerard:

“Keystone XL is not going away.  The president will have to deal with it, if not now then next year – when existing bipartisan majority support for Keystone XL in both the House and Senate will only be stronger. We will work with the new Congress to focus on getting this important jobs project approved. We will not give up until the pipeline is built. The significant gains in jobs, economic growth, energy security and national security – which have been firmly established during six years of study – prove beyond any reasonable doubt that Keystone XL is in our national interest. The national interest question is the sole consideration before President Obama, and his failure to answer it is the sole factor standing between Americans and this shovel-ready infrastructure project.”

As the Keystone XL saga continues, opponents continue to offer up a familiar grab bag of myths, half-baked goods and distortions – all designed to keep the pipeline obstructed.  

Nothing new, of course. Keystone XL’s merits have been established over more than six years of close public scrutiny, including five thorough environmental reviews by the U.S. State Department – all of which have similarly concluded that the pipeline would have minimal effect on the environment and that the crude oil it will deliver to the Gulf Coast would have no material impact on U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

The fact is Keystone XL has been studied, probed, examined, researched and analyzed like no other energy infrastructure project before it. There have been public hearings and hours of congressional debate. Through it all, Keystone XL has maintained strong support from the American people – 60 percent in a new USA Today poll.

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api-standards-program  oil-and-natural-gas-development  technology-innovation  offshore-platforms  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 12, 2014

Newly published API recommended practices for offshore structures supporting oil and natural gas drilling and production operations – reflecting technological advances and updated design applications – can help improve planning, construction and maintenance of important energy infrastructure. They are intended to work together to enhance the approach to offshore structural design.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  job-creation  economic-growth  canadian-oil-sands  congress  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 6, 2014

Over the past few years it has been difficult to know President Obama’s true position on the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline, now under federal review more than six years. That’s likely to change in the new Congress, with Republicans saying Keystone XL legislation will be a top priority soon after the first of the year. North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven talked to Fuel Fix.com:

“The president opposes the project and has tried to defeat it with delay,” Hoeven said, but “given the clear vote from the American public and strong bipartisan support, he may decide it’s time to start working with Congress, and this is a good example of a place to start and why you’ll see us advance the measure early on.”

Given the mid-term election results, President Obama soon will be called to make a decision on Keystone XL – one that will indicate his willingness to work with the new Congress on an issue that has strong public support and one that also will show whether he’s serious about an all-of-the-above approach to energy and American energy security.

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regulation  energy-safety  infrastructure  crude-oil 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 3, 2014

About a month ago, API President and CEO Jack Gerard stressed the importance of taking a comprehensive approach to develop new federal rules to govern the shipment of crude oil by rail – the soundest way to improve the North American rail network’s already strong 99.998 percent success rate:

“API supports a rule that ultimately improves the safety of rail transportation in North America through a holistic approach while allowing for the continued growth of the energy renaissance that has created and supported millions of jobs across the U.S. and Canada.”

The goal is realizing actual safety improvement. Industry is highly motivated in the quest for safety. Hess Corporation’s Lee Johnson, rail logistics advisor:

“My view has always been that I think the oil industry is maniacally focused on safety because of the consequences of failure in anything. … Everybody is very safety conscious, safety trained and well-equipped.”

With those stakes, developing the best safety rules possible is the objective. Industry believes improving safety is a multi-faceted endeavor – requiring enhanced prevention, mitigation and response measures – and it should be science-based.

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infrastructure  pipelines  storage-tanks  fuels  oil-and-natural-gas-industry 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2014

Let’s talk energy infrastructure, focusing on the pipelines and the fuel storage and dispensing facilities in this country that keep commercial jetliners in the air and our vehicles moving on the roads and highways.

Part of that system is visible in suburban Washington, D.C., at the terminus for Kinder Morgan’s 3,100-mile Plantation Pipeline network (left) and the neighboring Newington Terminal, which API staff members toured recently.

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oil-and-natural-gas-investments  infrastructure  job-creation  economic-growth  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2014

It’s one thing to talk about energizing the U.S. economy, it’s another to walk the talk. America’s oil and natural gas industry is doing that, with four companies ranked in the top 10 of the Progressive Policy Institute’s list of leaders in U.S. capital spending in 2013.

ExxonMobil ($11.07 billion), Chevron ($10.56 billion), ConocoPhillips ($6.35 billion) and Occidental Petroleum ($5.5 billion) ranked in the top 10 in U.S. capital spending – expenditures for plants, property and equipment. Also significant: The same four are in the top 10 of cumulative U.S. capital spending over the three years (2011-2013) PPI has compiled its “investment heroes” list.

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vote  domestic-energy-development  oil-and-natural-gas-production  infrastructure  poll 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 14, 2014

Energy figures to be an important voting issue come November in a number of key states, new polling indicates. In separate surveys conducted by Harris Poll registered voters in FloridaMissouriNew YorkNew Jersey and Pennsylvania – 70 percent or more in each state – said they are more likely to favor a candidate who supports increasing oil and natural gas production and energy infrastructure. 

Another result that could generate traction in this fall’s elections: More than 60 percent of registered voters in each of the states said they think the federal government doesn’t do enough to encourage the development of the nation’s energy infrastructure.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  eia34  permitting  regulation  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 15, 2014

Three keys to a true, all-of-the-above energy policy: increasing access to U.S. energy reserves, implementing sound regulatory policies and creating an environment that fosters investment in energy innovation and development.

Government has an important role to play in all three. While it can’t create an energy revolution like the one occurring in the United States today, it can help sustain and grow it. Unfortunately, government also can hinder it – with limited vision, misplaced priorities and poor policy choices.

Thus, “architecture of energy abundance” remarks by U.S. Rep. Fred Upton at this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) energy conference are particularly timely.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  regulation  permitting  infrastructure  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 26, 2014

It’s good to see the U.S. House of Representatives advancing a true all-of-the-above energy strategy with legislation that would help increase access to domestic reserves, promote common-sense regulation and reasonable permitting policies, foster development of key energy infrastructure and capitalize on America’s energy superpower status.

All are elements in a working, all-of-the-above approach to energy. Combined with energy from coal, nuclear and renewables, increased development of American oil and natural gas and associated infrastructure will keep our economy and country running – today and tomorrow.

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air-quality  oil-sands  exports  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 3, 2014

Reuters: Rising U.S. imports of crude oil from Canada's oil sands have not increased greenhouse gas emissions from the country's oil refineries because they have been offset by refining of cleaner domestic crudes, a report from a private sector think tank said on Monday.

The report, from industry consultants IHS CERA, comes as the Obama administration moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. power sector by 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, under new rules aimed at reducing America's longstanding reliance on burning coal to generate electricity.

The oil sands sector has faced frequent criticism from environmentalists concerned about greenhouse gas emissions. U.S. imports of carbon-rich Canadian oil-sands crudes grew by 900,000 barrels per day to more than 2 million bpd between 2005 and 2012, according to the IHS CERA report.

It said they did not result in higher greenhouse-gas intensity from the energy sector, however, as other crudes imported from abroad were supplanted by so-called tight oil from domestic shale-oil deposits.

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