The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  lng-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  drilling  access  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 6, 2014

America has a clear choice on energy. An historic American energy revolution is in progress -- thanks to vast shale reserves safely developed with advanced drilling technologies, industry innovation and leadership. This revolution is creating jobs, strengthening our economy and making our country more secure and muscular in the world. With the right energy choices the revolution can continue and grow.

Yet, somehow, Washington is conflicted. While the Obama administration embraces the shale revolution as integral to its all-of-the-above energy strategy, it advances policies fraught with the potential to needlessly hinder it. Instead of taking actions to enhance America’s energy renaissance, the administration is engaged in a regulatory march that quite likely could diminish it. Sustaining this energy revolution should be a no-brainer – not the brain-bender the administration is fostering with muddled vision and contradictory statements.

During a conference call with reporters this week, API President and CEO Jack Gerard discussed inconsistencies between what top administration officials say about U.S. energy development and what the agencies under them are doing to U.S. energy development.

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ozone-standards  epa34  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulation  economic-impacts  energy-101 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2014

When EPA proposed tightening the national ozone standards a few years ago, President Obama told the agency to stand down. The existing standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) wasn’t due for review, and there was concern stricter standards might harm the economy.

It’s a concern that hasn’t diminished as the agency starts regular review of ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Howard Feldman, API’s director of regulatory and scientific affairs, discussed the review during a conference call with reporters:

“We recognize that EPA has a statutory duty to periodically review the standards. However, the current review of health studies has not identified compelling evidence for more stringent standards. Tightened standards could impose unachievable emission reduction requirements on virtually every part of the nation, including rural and undeveloped areas. These could be the costliest EPA regulations ever.”

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epa-overreach  fuel  gasoline  regulation  economic-impacts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 11, 2014

Last month EPA implemented new gasoline regulations requiring the last microscopic bits of sulfur to be removed from fuel. The Tier 3 standard is likely to hit consumers and burden the economy while providing, at best, negligible benefit.

Writing for the Jefferson Policy Journal, Paul Driessen makes a number of important points about the potentially onerous effects of the new regulation. Driessen starts by underscoring how unnecessary the new standard is.

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ethanol-blends  renewable-fuel-standard  regulation  epa34  consumers  cellulosic-biofuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 25, 2014

Check out our new ads on the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)  – including a video that highlights in a humorous way the potential negative impacts for consumers from RFS mandates that force higher ethanol blends into the marketplace.

Unfunny would be seeing boaters left high and (not so) dry because their marine engine conked out, damaged by higher ethanol-blend fuel. Or stranded motorists, or home owners with outdoor equipment ruined by using fuel with more ethanol content than the mower or trimmer was designed to use. These are the real-world stakes in the current debate over the RFS and its ethanol mandates.

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american-energy  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  economy  jobs  environment  energy-security  ethanol  regulation 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 19, 2014

The Geopolitical Consequences of the Shale Revolution 

Foreign Affairs (Blackwell and O’Sullivan): Only five years ago, the world’s supply of oil appeared to be peaking, and as conventional gas production declined in the United States, it seemed that the country would become dependent on costly natural gas imports. But in the years since, those predictions have proved spectacularly wrong. Global energy production has begun to shift away from traditional suppliers in Eurasia and the Middle East, as producers tap unconventional gas and oil resources around the world, from the waters of Australia, Brazil, Africa, and the Mediterranean to the oil sands of Alberta. The greatest revolution, however, has taken place in the United States, where producers have taken advantage of two newly viable technologies to unlock resources once deemed commercially infeasible: horizontal drilling, which allows wells to penetrate bands of shale deep underground, and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which uses the injection of high-pressure fluid to release gas and oil from rock formations. 

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workplace-safety  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 18, 2014

The oil and natural gas industry is committed to the safety of highly trained workers who are helping lead America’s energy renaissance. That’s why – while questioning some of the analysis underlying proposed new limits on breathable crystalline silica in the workplace – industry will work with government officials on a final rule that’s workable, protects workers and helps build on industry’s safety record.

That record is a strong one. Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows incidence rates for oil and natural gas extraction and support activities are lower than the private industry rate, the mining industry rate (excluding oil and gas) and the overall Natural Resources and Mining rate. Below, one of the official comments submitted by API and the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA) to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which has proposed the new crystalline silica rule:

While the Associations and their members will never be satisfied with any incidence rate that exceeds 0.0, we believe that our industry’s occupational health and safety efforts are bearing fruit. Member companies of the Associations have extensive safety programs in place and also work through trade associations to increase workforce safety through research, information sharing, training, and through the development of standards.


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regulation  permitting  investment  keystone-xl-pipeline  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2014

During Tuesday’s State of American Energy address, API President and CEO Jack Gerard sketched out a more secure energy future for the United States – based on increased access to domestic oil and natural gas reserves, industry technology and ingenuity and a business/investment climate that allows development to go forward.

Let’s focus on that last part, which is less a request for government to do something than simply asking it to avoid hindering safe and responsible energy development through misguided policies and overreaching regulation.

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soae-2014  state-of-american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 7, 2014

API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s annual State of American Energy address put surging U.S. oil and natural gas production into context, saying that it has created a generational opportunity to secure this country’s energy future – an opportunity that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Gerard:

“Our future is ultimately of our own design. … We will decide if America continues its march toward global energy leadership – a once-in-a-generation choice – or remains content to play a supporting role in the global energy market. We can erase what for decades has been America’s greatest economic vulnerability – our dependence on energy sources from other continents, particularly from less stable and friendly nations – and fundamentally alter the geopolitical landscape for decades to come, all while providing a much needed boost to our economy. But only if we get our energy policy right.”

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fracking  fracking-fluid  hydraulic-fracturing  regulation  access  economic-benefits  safety-standards 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 21, 2013

Legislation passed by the U.S. House would help preserve effective state regulation of hydraulic fracturing by limiting Interior Department enforcement of unnecessary fracking rules on public lands. Effective regulation has an important role in safe and responsible energy development, and states are best positioned to do just that. Erik Milito, API’s director of upstream and industry operations:

“Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling are safe, proven technologies that have allowed the U.S. tooutpace Russia as the world’s number one producer of oil and natural gas. Job growth, energy security, andgovernment revenue are all rising due to the U.S. energy revolution, and state regulators are in the best positionto preserve America’s progress while protecting our natural resources with rules tailored to local hydrology,geology, and natural resources.”

The combination of advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched the current shale energy revolution in America– a surge that can continue with increased access to oil and natural gas reserves, including those on public lands, and common-sense regulation led by the states. In terms of future economic growth and greater security in the world, U.S. shale energy is agame-changer. Below are 10 things everyone should know about it.

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lng-exports  natural-gas-benefits  job-creation  trade  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2013

Earlier this year an ICF International study found that exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) would have dramatic national impacts on jobs, economic growth and revenue generation for government.  Now a second ICF study shows what the impact of LNG exports would look like on a state-by-state basis. They’re huge:

  • LNG exports could contribute as much as $10 billion to $31 billion per state to the economies of natural gas-producing states such as Texas, Louisiana and Pennsylvania by 2035.
  • Producing states could see employment gains as high as 60,000 to 155,000 jobs in 2035.
  • Non-producing states also will benefit, partly because of the demand for steel, cement, equipment and other goods used in natural gas development. ICF said states including Ohio, California, New York and Illinois will see gains to their economies as high as $2.6 billion to $5 billion per state in 2035.
  • In terms of jobs, large manufacturing states like California and Ohio will see gains of 30,000 to 38,000 in 2035, ICF says.

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