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Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  methane  natural-gas-development  safe-operations  air-quality  epa34  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 8, 2015

Before getting into the latest in a series of research studies on energy-related methane emissions, it’s important to stay focused on the big picture. 

Data from EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report published this spring shows that net methane emissions from natural gas production fell 38 percent from 2005 to 2013 – even as natural gas production rose dramatically. Also: Methane emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells declined 79 percent from 2005 to 2013, EPA found.

That’s the appropriate context for 11 new studies just published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology, reporting research in the Barnett Shale play in North Texas. The studies follow others coordinated by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).  One released in 2013 found that methane emissions from natural gas drilling were a fraction of previous estimates. Another released earlier this year found that that vast majority of natural gas facilities – from the production phase to distribution via inter- and intra-state pipeline networks – recorded methane loss rates of below 1 percent.

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analysis  pipeline-safety  standards  american-petroleum-institute  crude-oil  petroleum-products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 8, 2015

A barrel of crude oil or petroleum product shipped by pipeline is safely delivered to its destination more than 99.999 percent of the time, but the industry’s objective remains: zero releases, zero incidents.

Toward that goal, API has just released a new standard to guide operators in the development of a systems approach to safety management – helping them to continuously evaluate their efforts and constantly improve safety. API Midstream Director Robin Rorick:

“Pipelines are safe and efficient, but we are always looking for new ways to make them better, which is why industry is embracing this new standard. It’s also a great example of what can be done when industry, regulators and all key stakeholders work together to achieve a common objective, which is to protect the public, the environment and provide the fuels Americans need.”

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analysis  north-carolina  atlantic-ocs  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 8, 2015

Today’s post continues our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started the series with Virginia. Yesterday we reviewed the benefits in Indiana. Today: North Carolina. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-development  income  indiana  oil-and-natural-gas-development  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 7, 2015

Last week, we launched a series of posts that, over the next few weeks, will highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. The series started with Virginia, Ohio, Colorado, and New Mexico . Yesterday, we looked at Missouri. Today: Indiana.

The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  keystone-xl  south-dakota  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2015

Another sign of the times on the Keystone XL pipeline: South Dakota’s Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is weighing pipeline builder TransCanada’s request for a reissued construction permit because the company’s original permit died of old age – victimized by the White House’s failure to decide on Keystone XL despite nearly seven years of review.

That’s right. TransCanada’s  first construction permit for the 314 miles of the pipeline that would cross South Dakota expired last summer. You could say the cause of death was neglect – neglect by the White House, with its Keystone XL review approaching the seven-year mark this fall.

So, TransCanada seeks a reissued permit. The PUC is scheduled to hold a public input session Monday night, followed by evidentiary hearings July 27 and Aug. 4.

A couple of points. The first is to underscore again the absurd and unfair way the White House has kept Keystone XL in suspended animation, causing a state construction permit that’s good for four years to lapse. The second is to point out that the economic and energy merits of building Keystone XL – for South Dakota and the U.S. – remain unchanged, basically unchallenged by pipeline opponents.

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analysis  missouri  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  ozone-regulations  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 6, 2015

Last week, we launched a summer long series of posts that will highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started the week with Virginia and continued on with Ohio, Colorado and New Mexico. Today: Missouri.

The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added

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analysis  energy-development  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas  petroleum-products  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 3, 2015

What makes you happy? Good health? A pleasing career, your family’s well-being, realizing dreams? There are many things we could list that lead to happiness. One of the glories of America is that it’s up to us as individuals to choose – the search for happiness being fundamental to what it means to be an American.

To help celebrate Independence Day on the Energy Tomorrow Blog, we’ve been talking about the relationship between energy and basic, endowed rightslife, liberty and today: the pursuit of happiness.

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analysis  jack-gerard  energy  government  regulation  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas  methane-emissions  revenue 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 2, 2015

A few months ago API President and CEO Jack Gerard explained why America is experiencing an energy revolution:

“We got to this era of energy abundance and global energy leadership because of the entrepreneurial spirit of the private sector, the hard work of the American worker and the unique system of private property and individual rights of the American marketplace.”

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analysis  new-mexico  income  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-development  ozone-regulations  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 2, 2015

Today we look at New Mexico, continuing our series of posts that highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started with Virginia, then Ohio, and Colorado. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

The topline numbers: 105,600 jobs supported statewide; according to PwC; $11 billion added to the state economy; $5.3 contributed to the state’s labor income. All are significant drivers for the state’s economy.

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analysis  energy-information-administration  fuels  income  oil-and-natural-gas  jack-gerard  state-of-american-energy  wood-mackenzie 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2015

This weekend our country celebrates 239 years of independence, as well as our collective belief in equality and unalienable rights – enumerated in the Declaration of Independence as “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Heading into Independence Day 2015, it’s fitting to draw some connections between American energy and American life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Today: life.

It’s hard to imagine modern life – in America or anywhere else for that matter – without liberal access to energy. It’s fundamental to sustaining life as we know it, while also providing fundamental opportunity to people across the globe for whom life is a daily struggle.   Let’s take a look at some charts from Max Roser’s Our World In Data project.  First is global energy use, with energy use starting to grow slowly around the 1900 and then taking off after World War II.

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