The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 22, 2014

The Hill: Energy-producing states have been able to bounce back faster and more successfully from the 2009 recession than states that import a majority of their energy, according to new research from a group aligned with Republicans.

The American Action Forum found energy-producing states that have been able to leverage the U.S. energy boom have double the rate of income growth of energy importers.

The report also found states that are energy producers have more than double the rate of job growth than states importing energy.

North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Texas are among the states that were able to bounce back quickly given their energy production.

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american-energy  economy  energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 21, 2014

Forbes (Robert Bradley Jr.): The environmentalist campaign to block the Keystone XL pipeline has run out of gas.

 

Canada’s largest energy firm, TransCanada, has announced plans to create an alternative to KXL that lies entirely within Canada’s borders – a pipeline that would transport crude from Alberta’s oil sands to our northern neighbor’s east coast.

 

Known as Energy East, the new project presents clear proof that, even without a U.S. pipeline, the Canadian oil sands will continue to be developed. By blocking KXL, the fourth and final leg of a 2,151-mile transnational project, green activists are simply denying Americans the project’s wide-ranging benefits. The U.S. State Department counts42,000 new jobs, plus the opening of a new way to get oil from Montana and North Dakota to Gulf Coast refineries.

 

If the Obama Administration doesn’t approve the 800,000 barrels/day, Alberta–U.S. Gulf Coast pipeline soon, an historic opportunity to improve the American economy and strengthen our country’s energy infrastructure will be squandered.

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energy-security  environment  jobs  exports  prices 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 20, 2014

Shale Boom Helping American Consumers as Never Before

Bloomberg: Oil traders might see the 27 percent slide in global prices as a bear market. For U.S. consumers, it’s more like an early holiday gift.

shale energy

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economy  environment  energy-efficiency  jobs  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 16, 2014

More Precise, Efficient Drilling Makes U.S. World’s Largest Petroleum Producer

 

AEI Carpe Diem Blog: The Department of Energy (EIA) video above explains how the steadily increasing productivity of oil and natural gas wells in the US — thanks to the increasing precision and efficiency of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing — is increasing US oil and gas production. The shale revolution has increased domestic energy production so much in recent years that the US is now the world’s largest producer of petroleum products and natural gas combined.


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economy  jobs  american-energy  rfs34  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 15, 2014

The State Journal (West Virginia): The U.S. Energy Information Administration's Drilling Productivity Report, released Oct. 14, revealed that the Marcellus Shale play is anticipated to produce more gas than other reported regions in November.

 

The Marcellus region is expected to produce 16,045 million cubic feet of gas per day in November 2014, reflecting a 217 mcf/day increase from October, making it both the highest-producing region among the Utica, Bakken, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Niobrara and Permian basins.

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economy  jobs  american-energy  crude-oil  exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 14, 2014

Huffington Post (Aspen Institute’s Thomas Duesterberg): The largely unanticipated boom in oil production in the last five years has revived a debate over whether the United States should reverse the forty-year old ban on exports of crude oil. Even though we still import around 30 percent of total crude and refined products, the U.S. refinery industry is unable to process much of the new supply of light crude oil produced from domestic light shale formations. In turn, domestic prices for light oil lag the world price and eventually could result in reduced levels of new production. Allowing exports would likely equalize domestic and world prices and also lead to more efficient global processing because many refineries abroad, especially in Europe, can do a better job than their U.S. counterparts. The United States would continue to import heavier grades of crude oil which its refineries are built to process.

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economy  energy-security  american-energy  jobs  gasoline-costs  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  ohio 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 13, 2014

Detroit Free Press: Ground zero for America's "shale revolution" in gas and oil production, North Dakota is also the reigning title-holder for lowest unemployment among the 50 states.

There were more unfilled jobs in September than job applications within the state, where oil field workers can make six-figure salaries and even the fast-food restaurants dangle hiring bonuses of $300 or more. The state has been recruiting specifically from Michigan for workers of all stripes and skill levels — hoping to entice entire families to relocate and grow roots.

North Dakota's official 2.8% jobless rate in August is essentially full employment, allowing just about anyone who wants a job to get one. At the same time, Michigan's rate of 7.4% was stuck above the 6.1% national average. (The national rate was 5.9% in September.)

North Dakota's roaring economy has been the envy of state governors and, for proponents of fracking, a shining success story for how an energy boom can produce a job boom, even for workers in professions that aren't directly related to extracting natural gas and oil.

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Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 10, 2014

EIA - Today in Energy: Total U.S. net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption fell to their lowest level in 29 years for the first six months of 2014. Total energy consumption in the first six months of 2014 was 3% above consumption during the first six months of 2013, but consumption growth was outpaced by increases in total energy production. These changes led to a 17% reduction in net imports compared with the first six months of 2013.

 

Total energy consumption increased every month in 2014 compared with the same month in 2013. However, 81% of the total increase in consumption came in January and February, reflecting the effect of colder weather during the polar vortex. Natural gas accounted for 55% of the 2014 year-to-date increase, coal for 24%, renewable energy for 12%, petroleum for 8%, and nuclear electric power for 3%. Of the total natural gas consumption increase, the residential and commercial sectors accounted for 69% of the gain, again reflecting the cold winter, while 30% of the increase came from the industrial sector, continuing a long-term trend toward higher industrial use of natural gas.

 

The increase in total energy production was almost entirely concentrated in petroleum and natural gas. Petroleum accounted for 52% of the 2014 year-to-date increase, natural gas for 27%, renewable energy for 9%, and nuclear electric power for 2%.

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american-energy  economy  energy-security  jobs  lng-exports  fracking  gasoline-costs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 9, 2014

Columbus Dispatch: Consumers are starting to catch a serious break for a change on energy costs.

 

Gasoline prices in central Ohio are at their lowest level in nearly four years, while the outlook for home-heating costs this winter is better than a year ago.

 

“There’s definitely more money in my pocket,” said Kathy Bury, 58, of Blacklick, in eastern Franklin County.

She tends to buy gasoline $20 at a time. At current prices, that’s three-fourths of a tank, which is much more than a month ago, a contrast that “makes me happy,” she said. 

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crude-oil  energy-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  crude-oil-prices  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  women-in-energy-industry 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 8, 2014

New York Times: HOUSTON — The Singapore-flagged tanker BW Zambesi set sail with little fanfare from the port of Galveston, Tex., on July 30, loaded with crude oil destined for South Korea. But though it left inauspiciously, the ship’s launch was another critical turning point in what has been a half-decade of tectonic change for the American oil industry.

The 400,000 barrels the tanker carried represented the first unrestricted export of American oil to a country outside of North America in nearly four decades. The Obama administration insisted there was no change in energy trade policy, perhaps concerned about the reaction from environmentalists and liberal members of Congress with midterm elections coming. But many energy experts viewed the launch as the curtain raiser for the United States’ inevitable emergence as a major world oil exporter, an improbable return to a status that helped make the country a great power in the first half of the 20th century.

“The export shipment symbolizes a new era in U.S. energy and U.S. energy relations with the rest of the world,” said Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. “Economically, it means that money that was flowing out of the United States into sovereign wealth funds and treasuries around the world will now stay in the U.S. and be invested in the U.S., creating jobs. It doesn’t change everything, but it certainly provides a new dimension to U.S. influence in the world.”

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