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Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy  economy  jobs  energy-security  environment  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 13, 2014

What They’ve Said About Keystone XL: Build It!

It’s hard to overstate the broad-based nature of political support for the Keystone XL pipeline, support that stems from the project’s benefits: upwards of 830,000 barrels a day of oil from Canada’s oil sands and the U.S. Bakken region, 42,100 jobsduring the pipeline’s construction phase, strengthened energy security – with the Keystone XL playing an integral role in a broad strategy that could see 100 percent of U.S. liquid fuel needs met domestically and from Canada.

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american-energy  energy-security  global-markets  exports  jobs  economy  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 7, 2014

The Shale Factor in U.S. National Security 

Reuters (Dobriansky, Richardson and Warner): The boom in domestic shale oil and gas production has increased U.S. prosperity and economic competitiveness. But the potential for this to enhance our national security remains largely unrealized.

The shale surge has boosted production by 50 percent for oil and 20 percent for gas over the last five years. Yet our political leaders are only just beginning to explore how it can help further national strategic interests.

We led a major study at the Center for a New American Security in the last year, bringing together a nonpartisan panel to examine national security implications of the unconventional energy boom. We decided that outdated idealization of “energy independence” is preventing the administration and Congress from focusing on current energy vulnerabilities and figuring out how Washington should secure our economic and security interests.

Though the United States now imports less oil than it has for more than a dozen years, we should not distance ourselves from international oil markets by pursuing full energy self-sufficiency. The best way to advance energy security is to remain engaged internationally with major energy players.

Read more: http://reut.rs/1iyeOys 

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fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  jobs  environment  energy-security  economy  infrastructure 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 5, 2014

Former Secretary Salazar Boosts Fracking, Keystone XL Pipeline 

Newsworthy today: Former U.S. Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, speaking at the North American Prospect Expo in Houston, notes  that hydraulic fracturing is, in part, the reason America is enjoying an energy boom that is making the country more energy secure and energy self-sufficient. Salazar

“We know that, from everything we’ve seen, there’s not a single case where hydraulic fracking has created an environmental problem for anyone. We need to make sure that story is told.” 

Salazar also said the Keystone XL pipeline is a ‘win-win” for America: 

“At the end of the day, we are going to be consuming that oil. So is it better for us to get the oil from our good neighbor from the north, or to be bringing it from some place in the Middle East?”

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american-energy  environment  energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  fracking  innovation 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 4, 2014

Free the Keystone XL Pipeline, Mr. President

Los Angeles Times: Welcome to the "year of action." In last week's State of the Union address, the president vowed to do whatever he has to help the economy, even if that means working around Congress: "What I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Some require congressional action, and I'm eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that's what I'm going to do."

The White House has touted the fact the president has a "phone and a pen" and he's not afraid to use them.

The president also vowed to cut red tape, and not for the first time. In 2013's State of the Union, he insisted that "my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits." And in 2012: "In the next few weeks, I will sign an executive order clearing away the red tape that slows down too many construction projects."

 

Read more: http://lat.ms/1eRaGFu

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keystone-xl-pipeline  environment  energy-security  jobs  manufacturing  ethanol  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 3, 2014

With last week’s release of the fifth positive environmental study of the pipeline by the State Department, much is being written about benefits that would follow the project’s approval – including jobs and economic stimulus – without significantly impacting the environment.

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american-energy  energy-security  energy-policy  fracking  exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2014

What The Captain & Tennille Teach Us About Energy Policy

Forbes: Love apparently didn’t keep the ’70s pop duo Captain & Tennille together.Toni Tennille has filed for divorce from Daryl Dragon after 39 years of marriage. Just as the pair’s most famous standard now rings false, so does our 1970′s notion of energy security. For the past 40 years, U.S. energy policy has been married to the idea of scarcity. Following the oil embargoes of the 1970s, we built policies, from export bans to ethanol mandates, based on the idea that we would forever be at the mercy of other oil-producing nations.

The hydraulic fracturing boom, however, has changed all that. North America is undergoing an energy renaissance. Domestic crude oil production has reached parity with imports, and the International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. may become the world’s largest energy producer as early as next year. Yet our policies remain stuck in the dark ages of scarcity. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are resisting efforts to lift the 1970s-era ban on crude exports, citing issues of “energy security.”

As Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., told the Wall Street Journal: “If we overturn decades of law and send our oil to China and other markets, oil companies might make more money per barrel, but it will be American consumers and our national security that will pay the price.”

There’s a difference between ensuring our energy security and hoarding resources. With our newfound abundance, security comes through continued development of domestic reserves.

Read morehttp://onforb.es/KMM7kV

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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  economy  energy-policy  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 30, 2013

Vaclav Smil’s Graph of the Year: The Natural Gas Boom

Washington Post: "[There are] too many choices possible, but here is one epoch-making trend: as the post-2008 rise of hydraulic fracturing drove U.S. natural gas prices down and increased the supply (in 2013 the U.S. will be again the world’s largest natural gas producer) oil and gas prices, traditionally moving in tandem, have diverged significantly. History is being made."

Crude and Natural Gas

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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 20, 2013

Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Gas Industry

Forbes: “Texas has recovered 100 percent of the jobs lost during the recession and added 597,000 beyond the previous peak in August 2008.”   – Texas State Comptroller Susan Combs

On Thursday, December 12, the Texas Comptroller’s Office released a report detailing the current state of the state’s budget.  The report was titled “Tracking the Texas Economy – Key Texas Economic Indicators”.  But given the content of the report, a better title might have been:

“Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Natural Gas Industry”

According to the Comptroller, the state ended its 2012-2013 biennium with a surplus of more than $2.6 billion, almost three times the previously projected amount of $964 million.  The reason why?  Because the Texas oil and natural gas industry’s tax payments were more than $2 billion more than anticipated.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1i8lWU5

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american-jobs  energy-security  global-markets  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 18, 2013

The U.S.’s Crude Oil Policy

Washington Post: The United States again is one of the world’s great energy powers. On Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration projected that American crude oil output will peak at nearly 10 million barrels per day by mid-decade, up from 6.5 million last year. Last month, the International Energy Agency figured that the United States would overtake Saudi Arabia as the top oil producer, at least for a time. Yet some politicians remain unwilling to let the country reap the full benefits of this boon.

For decades, the government has imposed restrictions on exporting domestically produced crude oil but not on refined petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. This arrangement seemed sensible; the country’s crude business wasn’t booming, but its refining industry was an economic powerhouse deeply embedded in world energy markets.

Now, however, new drilling techniques have resulted in a revitalization of U.S. crude production. But oil firms export only a tiny fraction of the roughly 8 million barrels they extract daily, even though the oil often isn’t the sort U.S. refineries are set up to process. Understandably, they’d like a wider market in which to sell.

Read more: http://wapo.st/18RWgmz


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american-energy  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 16, 2013

U.S. Says Golden Age of Natural Gas is Here to Stay

Forbes: A golden age of natural gas has begun in the United States and it will last for decades, according to an early release of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s 2014 Annual Energy Outlook.

The report forecasts a fracking-induced surge sustained in energy production through 2040, which will keep carbon emissions below 2005 levels for decades.

Natural gas production will rise a staggering 56% from 2012 to 2040, when production is forecast to reach 37.6 trillion cubic feet (Tcf).

Similarly, crude oil production is projected to rise annually for almost a decade.  In 2020, oil production will plateau slightly below production levels in 1970 and will gradually decline over the decade that follows.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1gC2TkS (Also reported by USA Today, AP, Fuel Fix, Cleveland.com

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