The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

energy-exports  lng-exports  fracking  emissions  crude-oil-production  shale-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 15, 2014

CNBC (Spencer Abraham/Bill Richardson): Once again the world is looking for America's leadership in unsettled times. Our diplomats have limited options to combat Russia's annexation of Crimea, but they can take greater advantage of a new tool in their toolbox that no administration has had for generations — U.S. energy abundance. American energy exports will not only create economic opportunities here at home but will provide strategic geopolitical advantages abroad.

The crisis involving Ukraine and Russia highlights the need for American energy leadership. Russia remains the world's largest exporter of natural gas, supplying 30 percent of Europe's imports. Countries on Russia's periphery, many nearly completely dependent on Russian supply, pay exorbitant oil linked prices. Many are NATO allies.

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energy-exports  lng-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  keystone-xl  oil-sands  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

Opponents of Natural Gas Exports Have It All Wrong

WSJ MarketWatch (Furchtgott-Roth): Americans opposed to the export of U.S. natural gas give many reasons for their position. But almost all of them are wrong.

The problem is that people underestimate the amount of this country’s natural gas and the potential effect exports could have on the world market.

Russia has swallowed parts of Georgia and Ukraine. No one is proposing that America send soldiers to defend those countries, even though we guaranteed Ukraine’s sovereignty in 1994 under the Budapest Memorandum. Instead, we can help our allies by diminishing Russia’s economic power over them. And that power rests on oil and gas.

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crude-oil  exports  energy-exports  job-creation  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 31, 2014

new study by ICF International makes the case for lifting trade restrictions that prevent the export of U.S. crude oil – consumer savings, job creation, domestic production growth and more:

  • $5.8 billion in consumer savings a year, on average, between 2015 and 2035 due to falling costs of gasoline, heating oil and diesel fuel.
  • Up to 300,000 additional jobs created in 2020, both due to higher oil production and U.S. consumers having more money to spend on goods and services.
  • As much as a 500,000 barrels-per-day rise in domestic oil production in 2020.
  • A $22 billion decrease in the U.S. trade deficit in 2020.
  • Economic growth totaling as much as $38 billion in 2020, with an average GDP increase of up to $27 billion a year through 2035.
  • An additional $15 billion to $17 billion invested in domestic exploration, development and production between 2015 and 2020.
  • An increase of as much as $13.5 billion in federal, state and local government revenues in 2020.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-policy  energy-exports  domestic-oil-production  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 14, 2014

More on the growing discussion of how North America’s energy renaissance – led by surging oil and natural gas production – affects U.S. energy and national security and gives our country the chance to positively impact global stability. A part of that conversation is the significant role the Keystone XL pipeline could play in securing our energy future, allowing our country to have greater influence abroad.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  energy-exports  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 13, 2014

With SPR Test, Obama Administration Warms Up to Flex U.S. Energy Muscle


Reuters (analysis): A rare U.S. test of its strategic oil reserves may be just coincidentally timed with the most serious stand-off with Russia in decades, but the underlying message of the move announced on Wednesday left little doubt: Prepare for the rise of a new global energy superpower.

The Energy Department said it would offer up to 5 million barrels of sour crude from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), with bids due in two days. Officials said the sale would ensure the reserves can still quickly deliver oil to refiners despite changing pipeline networks.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng34  energy-exports  infrastructure  investments  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 12, 2014

In a post last week we discussed the way the Ukrainian crisis is focusing a number of U.S. leaders on the potential foreign policy impacts of surging U.S. energy production. With its vast natural gas reserves, the U.S. could be a leader in the global market for liquefied natural gas (LNG), if we took the steps to make that happen – starting with government approval of permits to build LNG export terminals.

Unfortunately, that process is slow. Although the Energy Department has approved six applications since 2011, more than 20 still are pending. And the U.S. isn’t the only country eyeing the global LNG market. More than 60 non-U.S. LNG export projects are planned or under construction. In a number of ways, it’s a race to the rewards stemming from natural gas abundance.

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energy-exports  domestic-energy-development  trade  petroleum-products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 7, 2014

Big news from the Commerce Department this week is that U.S. exports rose to a new high in 2013 and imports dropped to their lowest level since 2009 for the smallest U.S. trade deficit since 2009 – thanks largely to reduced oil imports due to growing domestic production and record exports of products made from petroleum. The Wall Street Journal (subscription required) reports:

A booming domestic energy industry is largely responsible for the turnaround. Not adjusted for inflation, the value of petroleum exports—a category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, solvents and other products—reached a full-year peak in 2013. Petroleum imports, by value, were the lowest since 2010 and the volume of crude-oil imports, at 2.8 billion barrels, were the lowest since 1995.

Bloomberg reports the U.S. trade gap narrowed to $471.5 billion last year from $534.7 billion in 2012, with the trade balance on petroleum products shrinking to 20.2 percent, the biggest decline in four years.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  keystone-xl-pipeline  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  energy-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  soae-2014 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2014

API hosts its annual State of American Energy event on Tuesday at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., and the discussion will focus on choices our country can make to increase energy development, grow jobs and the economy and make us more secure in the world. The event will be streamed live beginning at noon. Join in the conversation on Twitter by using the #SOAE14 hashtag.

The event comes at a time when policymakers are considering important energy issues, some of them framed in recent posts by the National Journal and Politico. At the top of our list of key energy issues:

Keystone XL pipeline

Federal consideration of TransCanada’s application for a cross-border permit passed the five-year mark last fall – which means the Keystone XL could have been built twice in the time the pipeline has been held up by Washington.

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energy-policy  manufacturing  regulation  energy-exports  liquid-natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 11, 2013

Here’s one of the main things wrong with arguments some are making against the export of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG): They substitute narrow interests and agendas for the proved economic benefits of free trade to the entire United States – long demonstrated in the sale of countless other U.S. commodities to overseas buyers.

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