The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

climate-change  congress  energy  energy-policy  over-regulation  policy  waxman-markey 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 23, 2009

This week, the U.S. House of Representatives will take up the Waxman-Markey bill aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. While the oil and natural gas industry endorses the bill's goal of protecting the environment, this bill should be rejected. Simply stated, the Waxman-Markey climate change legislation will cost Americans billions of dollars, kill jobs and will not deliver the environmental benefits promised.

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congress  energy  energy-policy  obama  taxes  institute-for-21st-century-energy 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 18, 2009

Did you know that Congress is about to consider massive taxes and fees on the U.S. energy sector?

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access  congress  energy  energy-bill  energy-policy  gulf-of-mexico  offshore-drilling  energy-independence-and-security-act-of 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 17, 2009

Today, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 15 to 8 to approve an energy bill that would open part of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico for additional oil and natural gas leasing and clarify ambiguous language included in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This language--as originally written--could have prohibited federal agencies from using transportation fuels derived from Canadian oil sands.

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congress  energy  energy-citizens  energy-policy  energy-reality 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 15, 2009

When asked to summarize her trip to Washington last week, one of the women from the oil and natural gas industry offered two words--"extremely enlightening."

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congress  energy  energy-policy  over-regulation  waxman-markey  energy-bills 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 11, 2009

One of the most difficult tasks in Washington is connecting the dots. What I mean is this: advocates who have staked out positions on various issues often focus on the minutiae of proposed legislation, fight to have certain language included in bills on political or ideological grounds, and neglect to consider how American consumers could be affected. Occasionally, this inability to step back and see the real-life consequences of legislation creates laws that make little sense and are costly to the taxpayers.

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congress  energy 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 10, 2009

It would be hard to find a more determined group of people than the 29 women who've come to Washington this week to meet with members of Congress about energy. In their day jobs, some wear hardhats, others wear heels, but all work for an energy company.

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congress  energy  energy-development  energy-policy  hydraulic-fracturing  over-regulation  technology-innovation 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 9, 2009

API urged Congress to consider the ramifications of applying new regulations to the process of hydraulic fracturing today, just as members of the House and Senate introduced legislation to regulate the process under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

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energy-policy  energy-citizens  energy  congress  alaska 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 9, 2009

This is a face of the oil and natural gas industry.

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congress  energy  energy-bill  energy-development  energy-policy  offshore-drilling  outer-continental-shelf 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 8, 2009

In Washington this week, the House and the Senate will continue to work on energy bills on parallel tracks.

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technology-innovation  natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  ground-water-protection-council  energy-policy  energy-development  energy  congress 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 4, 2009

Have you ever heard of shale gas? It's the naturally occurring, clean-burning gas that is found in shale rock formations, and it's becoming increasing important as an energy resource in the United States. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy says there is enough so-called unconventional gas (shale gas, tight sands and coalbed methane) in the United States to supply our energy needs for the next 90 years. Other estimates extend this supply to 116 years.

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