The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  delaware  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulation  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 15, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Delaware. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with Wisconsin and Connecticut. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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analysis  crude-oil  energy-exports  global-markets  domestic-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2015

A potential nuclear deal with Iran that would permit the Iranians to resume exporting crude oil to global markets – short-term and long-term – underscores questions about our own oil export policies. Here are two: What are the implications of Iranian crude oil exports for U.S. production? And: When will our government lift de facto sanctions against the export of U.S. oil?

Bloomberg reports that Iran’s oil minister says the country can increase exports by 500,000 barrels a day as soon as economic sanctions are lifted, then an additional 500,000 barrels a day in the following six months. Richard Nephew of Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy is less optimistic about that kind of ramp-up. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has said Iran could reach 700,000 barrels per day by the end of 2016.

The point is, if there’s a nuclear deal that lifts economic sanctions against Iran, Iranian oil will be getting to market.

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analysis  connecticut  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulation  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 14, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Connecticut. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with Wisconsin. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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analysis  ozone  epa34  regulation  economic-impacts  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 13, 2015

Another data point in the continuing public discussion of EPA’s plan to make the nation’s standards for ozone more restrictive, even as the existing standards have ozone levels falling 18 percent from 2000 to 2013 – and giving every indication levels will continue to fall. A new study by the Center for Regulatory Solutions (CRS) details how more restrictive ozone standards would impact where a lot of people live: Chicago and the state of Illinois.

According to the study, 21 counties in Illinois would be out of compliance or in “non-attainment” if EPA tightens ground-level standards from the existing 75 parts per billion (ppb) to 65 ppb, as it may do. (The fact is EPA is considering a national level as low as 60 ppb.)

Those 21 counties represent nearly 80 percent of Illinois’ gross domestic product, or $613.4 billion. The CRS study says Cook County and five other counties that surround Chicago would be “ground zero” for the most dramatic ozone reductions, potentially affecting 65 percent of the state’s population, nearly 70 percent of its employment and 73 percent of its GDP.

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analysis  wisconsin  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 13, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Wisconsin. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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analysis  canadian-oil-sands  keystone-xl  economic-growth  president-obama  oil-imports  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 10, 2015

Here’s one takeaway from IHS’ new research report on Canadian oil sands: Thank goodness for Canada and its oil sands.

Along with our own domestic energy renaissance, oil sands imports from our northern neighbor and ally are growing America’s energy security. Oil sands crude is critically important now and will be into the future, IHS says – which is why we here in the United States should be ever so grateful for our energy partnership with Canada and attentive to ways that relationship can be strengthened.

Yes, that’s a reference to the long-languishing Keystone XL pipeline. If we’re serious about oil sands development – and IHS’ report strongly suggests Americans should be – then we should quit politicking to death the single biggest infrastructure project at hand that would facilitate oil sands transportation to the U.S.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  production  economic-benefits  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 10, 2015

The compelling case for lifting America’s decades-old ban on exporting domestic crude oil is multi-faceted.

There's the economic case, with NERA Economic Consulting estimated that lifting the ban could add $200 billion to $1.8 trillion to the U.S. economy between now and 2039. There's the case for consumers, with a variety of studies indicating that lifting the ban could lower prices at the fuel pump from 1.7 cents per gallon to up to 12 cents per gallon. There's the foreign policy case and the way home-grown crude oil could affect global relationships, helping allies and potentially neutralizing the ability of adversaries to use energy as a diplomatic weapon. Then there's the energy case. Domestic production, spurred by greater access to global crude markets, could grow by 2.1 million barrels per day to 4.3 million barrels per day over levels under the status quo, according to NERA.  

Certainly, each of these was argued again at a pair of Capitol Hill hearings, one by the House Agriculture Committee (video) and another by the Energy and Commerce Committee’s Energy and Power Subcommittee  (video).

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analysis  california  crude-oil-exports  energy-development  income  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 10, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with California. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and continued this week with Missouri, Indiana, North Carolina and West Virginia. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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analysis  wind-energy  shale-energy  natural-gas-wells  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 9, 2015

So, Facebook has posted an announcement that its newest data center near Fort Worth will be 100 percent powered by a wind farm that’s being built near Wichita Falls, Texas. Of the wind farm Facebook says:

Construction on the project is already under way on a 17,000-acre site in Clay County, just 90 miles from the data center, and we expect it to begin delivering clean energy to the grid by 2016. 200 MW is more energy than we will need for the foreseeable future, and we're proud to have played a role in bringing this project to Texas.

No question, this is a good example of one way that big wind figures into an all-of-the-above approach to energy – one in which America ensures its energy security into the future by harnessing all available energy sources.

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analysis  west-virginia  energy-development  income  ozone-regulations  oil-and-natural-gas-development  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 9, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with West Virginia. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and continued this week with Missouri, Indiana and North Carolina. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

Read More