The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

access  investments  natural-gas  offshore-drilling  oil34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 5, 2013

Ernst & Young has a new study detailing $185.6 billion in total capital spending by oil and natural gas companies last year – the largest in the history of the firm’s oil and natural gas reserves study. Marcela Donadio of Ernst & Young:

“The increased exploration and development spend we’re seeing in this year’s study speaks to the incredible opportunity unfolding in tight oil from shale formations and the high cost of developing these unconventional resources.”

The study of U.S. upstream (pre-refinery stage) capital spending by the 50 largest companies (based on 2012 end-of-year oil and natural gas reserve estimates) found a 20 percent increase compared to 2011. Ernst & Young said the increase was largely due to increased tight oil and liquids activity. That refers to development in tight-rock formations, made possible by hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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access  drilling  energy  federal-land  natural-gas  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 31, 2013

The U.S. Energy Information Administration has a new report that details the decline in sales of oil and natural gas from production on federal lands (2003-2012). Key points:

  • Sales of crude oil from federal lands, onshore and offshore, decreased 5 percent in fiscal year 2012 (ended Sept. 30) to 596 million barrels from 629 million barrels in FY 2011. That includes an 8-percent decrease in offshore volumes, partially offset by an 8-percent increase in much smaller onshore volumes.
  • Natural gas sales from federal lands decreased 7 percent in FY 2012 to 4,262 billion cubic feet (bcf) from 4,584 bcf in FY 2011. Offshore volumes were down 19 percent, while onshore was virtually unchanged.
  • Sales of all fossil fuels produced on federal lands (also including coal and natural gas plant liquids) fell by 4 percent in FY 2012.

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access  energy  gasoline  regulation  energy-101  jobs-and-economy  gas-prices  fuel-prices  onshore-oil-production  onshore-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Gasoline prices have been rising with the approach of the summer driving season – up to about $3.66, according to AAA – pushed there by rising crude oil prices. U.S. consumers need help. And they could get it – if the administration pursued a number of energy policies to put downward pressure on global crude costs, while abandoning other choices that could harm consumers.

API Chief Economist John Felmy’s reporter briefing Thursday focused attention on two paths: one that will increase domestic production of oil and natural gas and one that won’t. Unfortunately, the administration – via proposals to increase energy taxes and a new wave of questionable regulation – looks headed down the wrong path, a recipe for disaster for American energy:

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access  energy-innovation  energy-technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Great energy conversation this week at Real Clear Politics’ event: Fueling America’s Future. The summit’s two panels featured representatives from all of our energy sectors as well as the issues that will play large roles as policymakers debate the path that will keep our economy fueled and individual lives prospering.

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access  crude-oil  energy-information-administration  oil-supply  energy-101  economy  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2013

Increasing U.S. domestic production of oil matters. Energy Information Administration (EIA) chief Adam Sieminski had this analysis at an energy conference earlier this week (h/t Breaking Energy):

“There’s a fairly significant, long-standing relationship between spare production capacity in OPEC and what the pricing environment is for oil. So the 2 million barrel per day  increase in U.S. oil production that surprisingly took place over the last five years has resulted in higher OPEC spare capacity, and undoubtedly, has been a factor in why Brent oil prices are $103-$104/bbl rather than $125-$130/bbl.”

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access  co2-emissions  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 16, 2013

A pair of noteworthy items point to the sustainability of America’s shale natural gas revolution – and also its added benefits.

First, the newest biennial report by the Potential Gas Committee (PGC) says the United States has a total future natural gas supply of 2,688 trillion cubic feet (tcf) as of the end of 2012, a significant increase from its 2010 year-end estimate. Details:

  • 2,384 tcf in technically recoverable reserves, including 2,226 tcf from conventional sources, tight sands and carbonates and shales, plus 158 tcf in coalbed reserves. The overall future supply number is the sum of PGC’s technically recoverable figure and the Energy Department’s latest figure for proved reserves (dry gas).
  • Compared to the year-end 2010 estimate, assessed resources increased by 28 percent.
  • The assessment is the highest in PGC’s 48-year history.

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access  fairness  energy-taxes  lifo  section-199 

Stephen Comstock

Stephen Comstock
Posted April 11, 2013

Let’s dig into the details of the more than $90 billion (over 10 years) in new and targeted tax increases on America’s oil and natural gas companies that President Obama included in his FY2014 budget. Note: The tax provisions below are in no way “taxpayer subsidies” and are not unique to our industry. They constitute standard business deductions (some available to all other industries) and mechanisms of cost recovery – a fundamental and necessary component to a national income tax system. Here we go:

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access  keystone-xl-pipeline  lng34  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 28, 2013

Americans heard President Obama talk about his “all-of-the-above” energy strategy during last year’s campaign. They heard him praise the revolution in natural gas production from shale while hailing the rise in oil production on his watch. The words were encouraging, but it’s time for action. Erik Milito, API’s group director for upstream and industry operations, outlined the stakes during a conference call with reporters:

“We hope the president will take actions to match the ‘all-of-the-above’ energy strategy that was a central theme in his re-election campaign. We’ve heard rhetorical support for oil and natural gas, but it will take the right policies to meet the administration’s own projections that show oil and natural gas will be critical to meeting America’s energy needs for decades to come.”

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access  investment  poll  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2013

A new Harris Interactive national survey of registered voters finds that big majorities think higher taxes on the industry – as have been proposed by the administration and some in Congress – would be harmful to consumers and the economy. What’s more, respondents believe the idea is fundamentally unfair.

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natural-gas  energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 1, 2013

We say opportunities for oil and natural gas development in federally controlled areas – onshore and offshore – have been limited. Some are saying that’s false. Let’s look at the facts.

Claim: 70 percent of undiscovered oil and natural gas on federal lands is available for leasing and development.

Fact: 83 percent of areas controlled by the federal government are closed to oil and natural gas development.

What we have here is some sleight of hand with terminology. We’ll use the offshore situation to illustrate. During last year’s State of the Union address the president said he was directing the administration to open up more than 75 percent of America’s offshore resources for development.

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