The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  workforce  women-in-energy-industry  american-petroleum-institute  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2015

The video below was featured during last week’s Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) National Conference in Philadelphia, which highlighted the organization’s efforts to mentor at-risk youth. Take a look. “Darryl’s Story” is a compelling example of the positive effects of adult role-modeling – the good that can result when kids learn to dream big and then to work on their dreams. The energy connection: For Darryl, the journey took him to the oil and natural gas industry.

As an industry that’s creating opportunities that can be the realization of aspirations for fulfilling, well-paying careers, API is proud to partner with BBBS. The great news is that the oil and natural gas industry needs more Darryls, more young men and women who want to be geologists, engineers, chemists and the other specialties that comprise our modern workforce.

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analysis  women-in-energy-industry  workforce  colorado  american-petroleum-institute  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 4, 2015

A big event in Denver this week, highlighting the career opportunities for women in the oil and natural gas industry. “Women in Power” was attended by about 150 of Denver’s most influential female leaders and launched a larger Colorado initiative designed to help attract women to the industry and to retain them for life-long careers.

The Denver event was keynoted by Democratic strategist Celinda Lake and Republican strategist Linda DiVall, co-authors of a study released earlier this year  that found the chief factor in increasing female representation in the oil and natural gas industry workforce is making them aware of the benefits of industry employment – including pay and security benefits and the chance for career advancement.

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news  energy-tax-hikes  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  women-in-energy-industry 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 30, 2015

The Hill’s Congress Blog (Weinstein): In response to significantly lower oil and natural gas prices, America’s energy sector is retrenching rapidly.  The drilling rig count has dropped by more than 50 percent over the past year, while companies large and small have announced sizeable layoffs and cuts in their capital budgets for 2015 and 2016.  Nonetheless, several states, including Pennsylvania and Ohio, are considering imposing or hiking production taxes—called severance taxes—on oil and gas operators.  These increases will be in neither the public’s nor the industry’s best interests.

Governors and state legislators should keep in mind that in today’s competitive environment, producers in their states are simply “price takers.”  What this means is that any factor increasing the marginal cost of production, such as new or higher severance taxes, will put that state’s operators at a competitive disadvantage.  The result will be lower production today and diminished investment in the future.

What’s more, as the experience of Texas and other energy producing states has demonstrated over the years, severance taxes are not dependable revenue sources because they rise and fall with changes in output and price.  With prices for oil and natural gas expected to remain low for an extended period, their contribution to total state revenues is likely to be quite small and not enough to offset any sizeable cuts in other taxes.  In addition, it’s never good public policy to increase the tax burden one specific industry as opposed to imposing or hiking taxes generally across all industries.

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oil-and-natural-gas-industry  workforce  jack-gerard  women-in-energy-industry 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 12, 2015

API President and CEO Jack Gerard spoke to students at Texas Southern University in Houston this week about America’s energy revolution and career opportunities in the industry. Highlights from the speech (as prepared for delivery):

Today, the United States is first in natural gas production, petroleum refining and soon to be the No. 1 producer of crude oil as early as this year, with some projecting we are already there. We have surpassed all expectations and achieved a level of domestic energy production that was unthinkable even five years ago. … North American energy production is expected to increase for many years to come and as a result (and) so are the number of jobs available within the industry.

As an example, with one change to U.S. energy policy, lifting the prohibition on crude exports, the oil and natural gas industry within five years could create up to 300,000 jobs, almost 41,000 of them right here in Texas. Already, this new era of energy abundance has not only set production and refining records, it has also added 600,000 jobs between 2009 and 2011 to the nation’s economy at a time when it was needed the most. …

It will be up to the next generation of Americans, your generation, to expand and maintain our nation’s energy abundance and global energy leadership. It is up to my generation to make sure that you have skills, knowledge and information needed to make the most of that opportunity. 

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oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  women-in-energy-industry  workforce 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 7, 2015

The oil and natural gas industry expects to have 1.3 million jobs that will need to be filled through 2030 – the product of baseline growth, pro-development policies, capital investments and the need to replace retiring workers. That means opportunity. A 2014 IHS study for industry projected that women could account for 185,000 of these jobs.

The key is finding them. New research by American Viewpoint and Lake Research Partners, illuminating the attitudes and perceptions of women seeking employment in the oil and natural gas industry, could help. The firms conducted a series of focus groups with women between the ages of 18 and 44 – in addition to a national survey of 1,200 women in the same age group.

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crude-oil  energy-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  crude-oil-prices  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  women-in-energy-industry 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 8, 2014

New York Times: HOUSTON — The Singapore-flagged tanker BW Zambesi set sail with little fanfare from the port of Galveston, Tex., on July 30, loaded with crude oil destined for South Korea. But though it left inauspiciously, the ship’s launch was another critical turning point in what has been a half-decade of tectonic change for the American oil industry.

The 400,000 barrels the tanker carried represented the first unrestricted export of American oil to a country outside of North America in nearly four decades. The Obama administration insisted there was no change in energy trade policy, perhaps concerned about the reaction from environmentalists and liberal members of Congress with midterm elections coming. But many energy experts viewed the launch as the curtain raiser for the United States’ inevitable emergence as a major world oil exporter, an improbable return to a status that helped make the country a great power in the first half of the 20th century.

“The export shipment symbolizes a new era in U.S. energy and U.S. energy relations with the rest of the world,” said Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. “Economically, it means that money that was flowing out of the United States into sovereign wealth funds and treasuries around the world will now stay in the U.S. and be invested in the U.S., creating jobs. It doesn’t change everything, but it certainly provides a new dimension to U.S. influence in the world.”

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  education  workforce  women-in-energy-industry 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted September 18, 2014

America’s oil and natural gas industry supports 9.8 million U.S. jobs and 8 percent of the U.S. economy. Industry’s extensive network of 30,000 vendors, suppliers, and contractors create and support jobs and grow the economy in every state in the union and almost every congressional district.

What this speaks to is the unprecedented opportunity created by America’s 21st century energy renaissance, which is a direct result of technical advances in the U.S. oil and natural gas industry.  If we seize this moment in our history and work together on energy policies that promote the safe and responsible development of our nation’s enormous energy resources, our industry will not only create and support millions of well-paying jobs far into the future, but also make America a global energy superpower for generations.

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