The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

encana  analysis  shale-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  unconventional-oil  unconventional-gas  canada  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  economic-growth  investments  technology-innovation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2015

Encana President and CEO Doug Suttles participated in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s CEO Leadership Series last week with a luncheon address and a Q&A session with Linda Harbert of the Institute for 21st Century Energy. Highlights of the conversation below. Suttles joined Alberta-based Encana as president and CEO in June 2013. He has 30 years of oil and natural gas industry experience in various engineering and leadership roles. Before joining Encana, Suttles held a number of leadership posts with BP, including chief operating officer of BP Exploration & Production and BP Alaska president.  

Q: You opened your talk by saying I’m a North American energy company. … Can you shed a little light on the differences and similarities between operating in Canada and the U.S.?

Suttles: They’re not as big as many people would think. First of all, in the places we operate – Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi, and then Alberta and British Columbia – these are all natural resource states, and they understand that and I think the people and political leaders understand the importance, too. Both countries have high environmental expectations.

Probably the biggest difference you’d really see between them is the remoteness of operations, which creates a unique challenge in Canada. Many of our operations are away from large towns and cities … But you have an environment where I think people understand the benefits of our industry. They promote the industry, they support it.

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oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  unconventional-oil  unconventional-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  economic-growth  government-revenues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2014

There’s more evidence that the U.S. oil and natural gas industry is driving economic growth – not just in the industry itself, but also in the vast supply chain that sustains energy development – adding to overall GDP, wages and revenues to government.

A new IHS study, commissioned by the Energy Equipment & Infrastructure Alliance (EEIA) estimates that employment growth in the supply chain that supports unconventional oil and natural gas development – that is, energy from shale and other tight-rock formations with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – will outpace, by a more than a 2-to-1 margin, the U.S. average from 2012 to 2025.

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shale-energy  unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 28, 2014

An infographic that clearly illustrates America’s choice on shale energy: significant economic growth, job creation and generated revenue for government because of continued energy development – vs. lost opportunity in all three areas if development is restricted.

The information is from IHS’ study on the economic impacts of unconventional oil and natural gas development – energy from shale and other tight-rock formations, safely and responsibly produced with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling


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unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 19, 2014

The outlook for U.S. energy from shale and other tight-rock formations just keeps improving. Two new assessments underscore this.

First, a panel hosted this week by CSIS revisited the National Petroleum Council (NPC) report on U.S. unconventional natural gas issued in 2011 and concluded that new discoveries and technologies paint an even brighter picture than NPC did nearly three years ago.

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access  unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil  economic-benefits 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 18, 2013

Oil and natural gas development from shale is creating jobs and building the economy, providing America with a distinct competitive advantage in the world, API Chief Economist John Felmy told the National Association of Energy Officials this week in Denver. Felmy:

“The oil and natural gas industry has strengthened the U.S. economy by creating jobs, increasing household wealth, and securing America's future. If Congress and the administration are willing to support America’s domestic energy production, oil and natural gas are poised to fuel an economic renaissance."

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economy  jobs  income  unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 6, 2013

During a conference call with reporters to discuss IHS’ new report on the economic impacts of U.S. unconventional oil and natural gas development, IHS Vice President John Larson noted that while many of the report’s big numbers – including 3.3 million jobs that could be supported by 2020 and more than $468 billion in annual contributions to GDP – might be abstract to most Americans, the projected benefits to individual U.S. households from this energy activity are “real and tangible.”

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hydraulic-fracturing-jobs  unconventional-oil  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 5, 2013

NJ.com has an interesting article highlighting yet another example of the way benefits from the U.S. shale energy revolution are rippling through the economy – focusing on the changing fortunes of Linde, the world’s largest industrial gases company, with the emergence of U.S. shale.

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domestic-energy  energy-policy  natural-gas  regulations  unconventional-gas  unconventional-oil 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 29, 2012

Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Quality secretary and its energy executive have this article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, citing a pair of studies that say the amount of natural gas in the Marcellus Shale may be far greater than any previous government estimate

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access  domestic-energy  energy  energy-policy  natural-gas  unconventional-oil  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 25, 2012

America has a lot of oil and natural gas that's "unconventional" - energy trapped in a shale and other rock formations that can be producted through horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. So says a study released this week by respected energy consultant IHS Global Insight: By 2035, unconventional oil and natural gas development could yield more than $5.1 trillion in capital spending into the economy, support 3.5 million jobs and generate $2.5 trillion in cumulative federal, state and local tax receipts.

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