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Energy Tomorrow Blog

us-crude-oil-production  supply  global-markets  pump-prices  shale-energy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2014

Supply matters. According to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) chief Adam Sieminski, crude oil could cost at least $150 a barrel today because of supply disruptions in the Middle East and North Africa – if not for rising U.S. crude production.

Sieminski told the North Dakota Petroleum Council’s annual meeting that crude from the Bakken, Permian and Eagle Ford shale plays and others around the country has spiked in the past decade to more than 4 million barrels per day – enough to make up for outages in crude production elsewhere. Sieminski:

“If we did not have the growth in North Dakota, in the Eagle Ford and the Permian, oil could be $150 (per barrel). There is a long list of countries with petroleum outages that add up to about 3 million barrels per day.”

So, let’s rephrase things a bit: Clearly, U.S. production, adding to global supply, matters. A lot.

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economy  jobs  fracking  business  supply  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 10, 2014

Reuters: The U.S. government on Tuesday jacked up its forecast for oil production next year by 250,000 barrels per day (bpd) as the boom in shale oil drilling continues to confound expectations of slower growth.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration now expects domestic output to rise to 9.53 million bpd, growing by around 1 million bpd for a third consecutive year, according to its latest monthly short-term energy outlook. A month ago the EIA had predicted output growth would slow in 2015 to 800,000 bpd.

The U.S. shale boom has allowed producers to unlock thousands of barrels of reserves, putting the United States on course to become the largest producer of oil globally, which would dramatically reduce its dependence on imports.

"Rising monthly crude oil production, which will approach 10 million barrels a day in late 2015, will help cut U.S. fuel imports next year to just 21 percent of domestic demand, the lowest level since 1968," EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski said.

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supply  oil-and-natural-gas  manufacturing  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 14, 2014

Surge in Oil from U.S., Canada Helps Meet Global Demand

Wall Street Journal: LONDON—The dramatic increase in oil supply from the U.S. and Canada—coupled with a surprise surge in Iraqi output—helped stave off global demand pressures brought on by a cold U.S. winter and geopolitical concerns over rising tensions between Russia and Ukraine.

The International Energy Agency, a watchdog for the world's biggest energy consumers, said North American output helped mitigate a bigger-than-expected draw from global crude inventories, caused by a colder than usual winter in the U.S. Surging Iraqi crude output, which rose to its highest level since 1979, also helped keep global markets supplied, and prices in check.

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energy  security  supply 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 13, 2013

The bottom-line numbers in BP’s 2012 Statistical Review depict surging U.S. domestic oil and natural gas production, mainly because of the development of U.S. shale reserves through hydraulic fracturing:

  • 8.9 million barrels of oil per day (Mb/d) – U.S. production in 2012, the highest level since 1991.
  • 1 Mb/d – U.S. oil output growth last year over 2011, the largest increase in the world (14 percent) and the largest in U.S. history.
  • 84 percent – U.S. energy demand supplied by domestic sources, up from an all-time low of 69 percent just eight years ago.

BP’s chart on U.S. oil production, spanning the past quarter century:

BP Oil Outgrowth 

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supply  prices  gasoline  energy  demand  crude-oil  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

Gasoline prices have been climbing. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports:

The average U.S. retail price for regular motor gasoline has risen 45 cents per gallon since the start of the year, reaching $3.75 per gallon on February 18. Between January 1 and February 19, the price of Brent crude, the waterborne light sweet crude grade that drives the wholesale price of gasoline sold in most U.S. regions, rose about $6 per barrel, or about 15 cents per gallon.

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access  anwr  demand  domestic-energy  energy-policy  federal-lands  gulf-of-mexico  keystone-xl  liquid-fuel  offshore-drilling  onshore-drilling  supply  taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted August 27, 2012

Ridiculing a New York Times editorial blog is like shooting unusually large fish in a barrel, but this one from last Friday is so fantastical and extreme that a commitment to an honest debate on energy compels me to fire away.  And we don’t have to go far to start the fact check, as they lead with:

"The simple truth, as President Obama has recognized, is that a country that holds less than 3 percent of the world’s reserves but consumes more than 20 percent of the world’s supply cannot drill its way to energy independence."

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