The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas-benefits  consumers  natural-gas-supplies  nuclear  subsidies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2017

We support all-of-the-above energy – the concept that America is strongest and its citizens are best served when all of our country’s energy sources play their part. We’re also for the important role markets play in determining energy sources, because markets reward innovation, spur efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers. That said, a new study that basically argues market-distorting subsidies enjoyed by some energies should be followed by market-distorting subsidies for others makes little sense.

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taxes  tax-deductions  subsidies  spr34  renewable-energy  energy-taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted April 2, 2012

Update: The author has changed the article, without noting so. Original article hereThe new article suffers from many the same problems in that it fails to note that the majority of the money involved is through government efforts to lower prices in developing countries.  As the IEA notes ending this support will shift "the burden of high prices from government budgets to individual consumers…" and that “…low-income households are likely to be disproportionately affected by the removal…”

We see a lot of false arguments about “subsidies” for the oil and natural gas industry, but this tweet caught us by surprise...

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subsidies  natural-gas  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 30, 2012

In the video below API tax policy advisor Brian Johnson explains why rhetoric about oil and natural gas companies benefiting from taxpayer subsidies is just that, rhetoric.

Creating much of the confusion is the way terms like “subsidies” and “deductions” get used interchangeably. Does the oil and natural gas industry benefit from taxpayer subsidies? “Nothing could be further from the truth,” Johnson says. Take a look:

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taxes  subsidies  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  energy-taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 27, 2012

One of the most important things to know about producing oil on federal lands is that it takes time. Lots of it. As this chart developed by API illustrates, it’s up to a decade from the time a lease is won at auction to the first actual production of oil. If you include pre-lease sale studies and evaluation, which have to be done before companies bid on federal leases, that’s a couple more years.

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