The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

fuel  military  security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2017

U.S. Department of Defense personnel and units that are responsible for meeting our military’s fuels needs were recognized for outstanding performances in 2016 during this week’s Defense Logistics Agency Worldwide Energy Conference. America’s oil and natural gas industry is proud to provide the reliable fuels that keep the U.S. military on guard for the rest of us.

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lng-exports  trade  economic-growth  emission-reductions  security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2016

With environmentalists attacking a provision in pending energy legislation that would boost the competitiveness of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, now’s a good time to review the reasons to expedite federal approval of LNG export projects in this country.

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oil-and-gas  security  production  us-energy  economy 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 24, 2016

The United States is a global energy leader, thanks largely to technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. America’s energy leadership has proven successful in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening national security and keeping prices low for consumers. 

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  energy-exports  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2016

New figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the United States remained the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas in 2015, a position the U.S. has held since 2012.

Several important points here, supporting the idea that U.S. world energy leadership is a big thing.

First, U.S. production of oil and natural gas grew last year despite continued low prices for crude last year. U.S. output of petroleum and other liquid fuels grew from 14.08 million barrels per day in 2014 to 15.04 million barrels per day in 2015. According to EIA, natural gas production rose from 74.89 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) in 2014 to 78.94 bcf/d in 2015, or about 13.99 million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

The second point is the vast majority of U.S. energy production is the result of safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling – fracking.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  economic-growth  energy-exports  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2016

The United States in 2040 will be more energy self-sufficient, a net energy exporter and a lower source of energy-related carbon emissions as clean-burning natural gas becomes the dominant fuel for generating electricity. The leading energy source 24 years into the future – as they are now – will be oil and natural gas.  

So projects the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in an early look at select data from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2016 report that’s scheduled for full release in July.

The main takeaway from EIA’s “sneak preview” is the importance of the U.S. energy revolution – primarily oil and natural gas developed from shale and other tight-rock formations using safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling. The United States is stronger now and will be in the future thanks to domestic energy from fracking.

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crude-oil-exports  domestic-oil-production  security  economic-growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 7, 2015

t’s good that Congress appears to be talking seriously about ending the United States’ four-decades-old ban on crude oil exports. Reports say Democrats and Republicans are discussing a deal that would include lifting the export ban – though it’s unclear what a specific deal would look like. “We need to have a conversation” about oil exports, Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin told Politico. “We need to have a fair negotiation.”

Of course, we’ve been having a conversation about the merits of lifting the exports ban for some time. And it starts with this: Every major study on the issue has found that exporting U.S. crude oil would be good for America and Americans. The benefits range from those to consumers, to the economy, to American security to domestic energy production. According to the research, ending the outdated ban would positively impact all of the above.

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keystone-xl  pipelines  canada  security  oil-sands  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 12, 2015

Another postscript to the president’s unfortunate and shortsighted rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline last week: The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that as total U.S. crude oil imports decline, Canada’s share of the imports total is rising.

The data shows that in August 1995 the U.S. imported a total of 7.43 million barrels per day (bb/d), including a little over 1 million bb/d from Canada, about 13 percent of the total. In August this year U.S. oil imports were 7.63 million bb/d (down from a high of 10.7 million bb/d in June 2005), including 3.4 million bb/d from Canada, about 45 percent of the total. (At the same time imports from Venezuela, which produces a heavy crude similar to oil sands crude, have declined from 1.29 million bb/d in 2004 to 849,000 bb/d in August – no doubt, a result of increasing supply from Canada.)

What we see here is a snapshot of the strategically important growth in the United States’ energy partnership with Canada. Our neighbor and ally is our No. 1 source of imported oil – almost three times larger than imports from Persian Gulf countries.

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keystone-xl  pipelines  president-obama  climate  jobs  economic-growth  security  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 10, 2015

It’s too bad that when President Obama finally announced his decision on the Keystone XL pipeline, he turned his back on American jobs, economic growth and increased energy security – each of them compelling, “national interest” reasons for building the pipeline. Also unfortunate is that the president also turned his back on science and fact.

Read the State Department’s final word on Keystone XL, and you see that State, as it said in its previous environmental reviews, acknowledges that the pipeline would have little to no climate impact.

The Keystone XL rejection was about perceptions and appearances – perceptions the president and his administration created, detached from science and fact set forth in State’s analysis, to help cultivate the appearances of climate change leadership.

Throughout Keystone XL’s tortuous, seven-year slog at the White House, the pipeline – this pipeline – was a symbol, a foil the administration used to help keep the professional activist class activated and the world climate community applauding.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  jobs  economic-growth  canadian-oil-sands  security  labor 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 6, 2015

With President Obama’s unfortunate decision to reject the Keystone XL pipeline, look for a number of reports and analyses advancing the notion that the president’s decision is a “stunning defeat” for our industry, Canada and members of Congress who support the project. We disagree.

Canadian oil sands development that Keystone XL would have helped facilitate will continue. As an IHS study detailed earlier this year, oil sands production is critically important to North American supply and U.S. security, and it will go on – as will efforts to get Keystone XL off the drawing board, built and operating – creating jobs and increasing energy security.

The real defeat in the president’s decision has been inflicted on the American people. It’s their present and future that have been dealt a severe blow by a White House that ultimately valued out-of-the-mainstream political interests over the national interest.

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energy-policy  election  energy-exports  oil-and-natural-gas-development  security  production  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 3, 2015

API assembled a great panel of election/campaign experts to discuss how Election 2016 is shaping up and which issues will be salient when Americans vote a year from now. As for predicting the key issues 12 months into the future, the experts said what honest experts say: Who knows for sure? Yet, Public Opinion Strategies’ Glen Bolger no doubt was in the ballpark:

“I don’t think any one issue is going to dominate the election. … You’re going to have a number of different issues debated: foreign policy and national security being up there, the economy and jobs … Energy certainly can play a role in that, just given that it is a component of jobs and the economy. It’s a component of our national security, it’s a component of our foreign policy. I think energy will be an issue, but the question is how big.”

Great point. Energy and advancing the right policies for American energy certainly run through a number of the things Americans say they care about most: jobs, a thriving economy and safety for themselves and their families. That’s what comes through the results of a new Harris Poll of 2,800 registered voters: energy, energy, energy.

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