The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  exports  lng34  russia  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2017

An important factor in sustaining and growing the United States’ position as an energy superpower is the continued ability of U.S. natural gas and oil companies to operate competitively the world over, to continue developing the energy needed here at home while also supporting energy exports to aid friends overseas. Legislation crafted by the U.S. Senate to increase sanctions on Russia could work against this.

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russia  energy-development  offshore-development  us-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2017

Sanctions are a valuable tool of American foreign policy, but U.S. Senate legislation intended to increase sanctions against Russia could harm the competitiveness of a range of U.S. energy companies working around the world, posing risks to U.S. jobs, the economy and individual Americans – and possibly benefiting Russian interests. The House of Representatives should make critical modifications to avoid these unintended consequences while strengthening the package to advance U.S. interests.

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lng-exports  russia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 16, 2016

With legislation to streamline and expedite approvals for U.S. LNG export projects pending in Congress, the U.S. ambassadors of Lithuania, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Poland and Slovakia wrote to congressional leaders this week, urging action. From their letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan (letters also were sent to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi):

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lng-exports  natural-gas  jobs  global-markets  economic-security  russia  electricity 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 24, 2016

Two separate but related news items last week demonstrate the economic promise and geopolitical significance of America’s natural gas export opportunity

The first headline, “U.S. LNG Set to Hit Global Market,” signifies a landmark moment in America’s trajectory from energy scarcity to abundance. The export facility covered in the article – Cheniere Energy’s Sabine Pass in Cameron Parish, La. – actually opened as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in 2008. Just two years later in September 2010, it became the first U.S. facility to apply for a Department of Energy permit to export LNG. After a decade that saw U.S. natural gas production jump 45 percent – and following an extensive review process – Sabine Pass is set to ship its first cargo to Europe.

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news  energy-exports  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-development  russia  regulation  saudi-arabia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2015

Roll Call (Reps. Joe L. Barton and Henry Cuellar)The advantages of lifting the ban on crude oil exports are not just theoretical talking points discussed in the halls of Congress, but rather supported by a large and growing body of research by government agencies, academic institutions and think tanks across the political spectrum. The latest is a study released by the Harvard Business School and the Boston Consulting Group. It highlights the obvious benefits lifting the ban will have on American families and businesses, our economy and global allies.

The study discusses the changing U.S. energy landscape and the opportunities made possible by America’s new energy abundance. The fear of a crippling dependence on foreign oil that existed in the 1970s, when the export ban was put in place, is no longer applicable today. In fact, the U.S. is now the world’s top petroleum producer largely due to our recent ability to produce oil and natural gas from shale formations. The world has changed drastically in the past 40 years and it is time for our policies to accurately reflect the current conditions in which we now live. We must embrace the United States’ new leading role on the world energy stage and recognize the value it would create in our everyday lives.

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energy-exports  crude-oil-production  global-markets  trade  eia34  russia  saudi-arabia  shale-energy  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2015

Following on yesterday’s post on increased domestic energy production that is backing out imports, we see that the U.S. remained No. 1 in the world in the production of petroleum and natural gas hydrocarbons last year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

The government agency responsible for quantifying all things energy says that U.S. oil and natural gas production has been trending higher than the output of Russia and Saudi Arabia, the second- and third-largest producers:

Since 2008, U.S. petroleum production has increased by more than 11 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu), with dramatic growth in Texas and North Dakota. Despite the 50% decline in crude oil prices that occurred in the second half of last year, U.S. petroleum production still increased by 3 quadrillion Btu (1.6 million barrels per day) in 2014. Natural gas production—largely from the eastern United States—increased by 5 quadrillion Btu (13.9 billion cubic feet per day) over the past five years. Combined hydrocarbon output in Russia increased by 3 quadrillion Btu and in Saudi Arabia by 4 quadrillion Btu over the past five years.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  domestic-access  exports  russia  offshore-development  onshore-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 30, 2014

The quest to encourage better behavior from Russia continues. President Obama and the European Union this week announced new sanctions to protest Russia’s involvement in Ukraine, measures that focus on Russia’s energy, arms and finance sectors. The president:

“Today … the United States is imposing new sanctions in key sectors of the Russian economy:  energy, arms, and finance.  We’re blocking the exports of specific goods and technologies to the Russian energy sector.  We’re expanding our sanctions to more Russian banks and defense companies.  And we’re formally suspending credit that encourages exports to Russia and financing for economic development projects in Russia. At the same time, the European Union is joining us in imposing major sanctions on Russia – its most significant and wide-ranging sanctions to date.”

Meanwhile, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says Europe needs to stand up to Russia, which will be easier to do if Europe diversifies its energy supplies:

“They need to understand they must stand up to [Russian President] Vladimir Putin. The reluctance has to do with European dependence on energy from Russia.”

Laudable sentiments and goals, but America can do more than impose targeted and inherently limited sanctions. The U.S. can do more than talk. America can do more to provide effective help for her friends and to diminish the influence of adversaries. Through energy, American energy.

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energy-policy  doe34  jack-gerard  lng-exports  global-markets  natural-gas  liquefied-natural-gas  us-chamber-of-commerce  russia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 5, 2014

Politico reports (sub req'd) that the Energy Department plans to stick with its “case-by-case” approach to approving natural gas export projects – even as some policymakers say speeding up the process would send a strong signal that the United States is  a leader in global energy markets, expanding its ability to broaden supply options and defuse energy-related standoffs like the one playing out between Russia and Ukraine.

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access  cuba  domestic-energy  energy-policy  gulf-of-mexico  offshore-drilling  rhetoric-vs-reality  russia  global-energy 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 19, 2010

America's "stuck in neutral" energy policy has just received another shot over the bow. This time it comes from Russia, which is one of several countries that are actively seeking oil and natural gas resources in the Western Hemisphere. 

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