The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-gas  energy  renewable-energy  everything 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 25, 2016

Piggy-backing on the start of the Series, we’ve filled out a lineup card of our own – America’s Energy Lineup. It’s a fantastic lineup with contributors at every position – no “Who’s on First, What’s on Second” shenanigans with this group . They’re all major leaguers, a great mix of energy sources that includes reliable veterans as well as exciting up-and-comers, anchored by clutch, big-time producers in the key power spots, Nos. 3 and 4.

Bottom line: When America’s all-of-the-above energy lineup is in the field, we all win.

Read More

california  oil-and-natural-gas  refinieries  renewable-energy  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 1, 2016

California is the country’s third-largest oil producer, delivering more than 201 million barrels of oil in 2015, behind only Texas and North Dakota. At the same time, the state ranks third in oil refining capacity from its 18 operating refineries. Bottom line: California plays a major role in meeting its own energy and fuel needs, as well as those of the West Coast and beyond.

Read More

renewable-energy  natural-gas  emission-reductions  vote4energy 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 25, 2016

We recently talked about the essential friendship between natural gas and renewables – a point driven home today by the EIA in pointing out that monthly U.S. renewable electricity generation in 2016 has surpassed levels from previous years in every month so far this year. In March and April of this year, nonhydro renewables accounted for more than 10 percent of electricity generation in the U.S.

Read More

natural-gas  climate  emission-reductions  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2016

I really like this quote from Chris Mooney’s analysis in the Washington Post last week – the speaker being Italian scientist Elena Verdolini, whose new research basically finds that solar and wind energy need big help from natural gas:

“If you have an electric car, you don’t need a diesel car in your garage sitting there. But in the case of renewables, it’s different, because if you have renewable electricity and that fails, then you need the fast acting gas sitting in your garage, so to speak.”

Read More

natural-gas-benefits  co2-emissions  emission-reductions  us-energy-security  economic-benefits  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 4, 2016

Just recently saw this article on National Geographic.com, suggesting the United States made a significant shift in its energy economy in 2015:

Consider what happened last year alone. The amount of electricity from coal-fired power plants hit a record low while that from natural gas generators hit a record high. Also, renewable energy added the most new power to the electric grid, and annual carbon emissions reached a 20-year low.

First, a reminder that new power capacity added to the grid doesn’t translate directly to new power. Below, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data shows that in terms of electricity generation change (from 2014 to 2015) at utility-scale facilities and including distributed solar, natural gas led in net generation:  

That’s not knocking renewables, just an illustration of today’s energy reality and a reminder of the oft-overlooked energy, economic and climate benefits accruing to the United States from increasing natural gas use.

Read More

analysis  wind-energy  shale-energy  natural-gas-wells  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 9, 2015

So, Facebook has posted an announcement that its newest data center near Fort Worth will be 100 percent powered by a wind farm that’s being built near Wichita Falls, Texas. Of the wind farm Facebook says:

Construction on the project is already under way on a 17,000-acre site in Clay County, just 90 miles from the data center, and we expect it to begin delivering clean energy to the grid by 2016. 200 MW is more energy than we will need for the foreseeable future, and we're proud to have played a role in bringing this project to Texas.

No question, this is a good example of one way that big wind figures into an all-of-the-above approach to energy – one in which America ensures its energy security into the future by harnessing all available energy sources.

Read More

ethanol  cellulosic-biofuels  renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  e1534  renewable-energy  environment  energy-efficiency 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 9, 2013

A tactic used by ethanol backers trying to defend the relatively defenseless Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is attempting to frame the RFS debate as one between America’s oil and natural gas companies and renewable energy.

That’s faulty for a couple of important reasons. First, we’re Big Ethanol’s biggest customers, buying billions of gallons a year, as a useful additive in E10 gasoline. Second, our companies are for renewables, not against them, investing $81 billion in renewables and carbon-reduction efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions between 2000 and 2012 – nearly as much as all other U.S. industries ($91 billion) and more than the federal government ($80 billion).

Read More

eia-forecast  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2013

A few words of support for Adam Sieminski and his professional team at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). When it comes to collecting data about our energy past, analyzing trends and projecting future energy supply and demand, no one does it better than EIA. Which is why reported grousing over EIA’s forecasts for renewable energy raise an eyebrow, or two.

POLITICO picks up on the grousing in Sieminski’s response to an earlier letter from some groups, in which it’s clear some in the environmental community are concerned that EIA’s renewable projections are lower than recent growth trends. Again, from Sieminski’s response, some have suggested that EIA’s projections haven’t been grounded in science.

EIA has a reputation for calling them as it sees them, so the complaint is a little surprising

Read More

taxes  tax-deductions  subsidies  spr34  renewable-energy  energy-taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted April 2, 2012

Update: The author has changed the article, without noting so. Original article hereThe new article suffers from many the same problems in that it fails to note that the majority of the money involved is through government efforts to lower prices in developing countries.  As the IEA notes ending this support will shift "the burden of high prices from government budgets to individual consumers…" and that “…low-income households are likely to be disproportionately affected by the removal…”

We see a lot of false arguments about “subsidies” for the oil and natural gas industry, but this tweet caught us by surprise...

Read More

domestic-access  domestic-energy  drilling  energy  energy-information-administration  energy-policy  permits  renewable-energy  revenue 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2011

The future is going to require a lot of energy, of all kinds. World energy consumption is projected to grow nearly 50 percent by 2035. Renewable energy is projected to increase by nearly 200 percent by 2035 over 2008, thanks to leadership and investment from our own industry and others.

Read More