The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  federal-government  consumers  fuels  renewable 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted January 16, 2015

Pacific Standard magazine (PS) has an interesting longread on honeybees in its January issue. While this is not our area of expertise and we can’t judge the veracity of the entire article, there was one part that we had, unfortunately, seen before:

Over a million acres of grassland were converted to crops in five Midwestern states from 2006 to 2011, according to a study by South Dakota State University. … Across the region more than 99 percent of what was originally prairie has been converted, mostly to corn and soy for animal feed, ethanol, and sweetener … Now the entire Midwest, several beekeepers told me, has become a “corn desert.” This has wrought devastation on most anything that used to live in the fields. Monarch butterflies no longer have milkweed for laying eggs. Birds no longer have insects to eat or prairie to shelter in. Native bees are disappearing.

The years 2006 to 2011 are not a coincidence, as the Environmental Working Group (EWG) explains:

After the federal Renewable Fuel Standard was signed into law in 2007, many corn growers decided to plant corn year after year to profit from higher prices, rather than switching between corn and soybeans, for example. This transition has greatly harmed air and water quality.

And apparently bees. But not to worry, the federal government is on the case.

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keystone-xl  ethanol  rfs34  renewable  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 14, 2013

National Journal Infograph: Field of Pipes

NJ’s Amy Harder writes that “as Washington fights, pipes meant for Keystone XL collect dust.” The graphic provides perspective: More than 200 miles of pipe worth $200 million sitting  in Gascoyne, N.D. waiting on approval of the 1,700-mile pipeline from Alberta, Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

AEI Ideas Carpe Diem Blog– U.S. Oil Output Increased to 24-Year High in Just Two Years

Blogger Mark J. Perry notes a Department of Energy report that found U.S. oil output averaged 7.57 million barrels per day – the highest domestic crude oil output since 1989, and more than 22 percent higher than the same week last year. Perry: “That’s pretty amazing – thanks to advances in drilling technologies, it’s as if we’ve discovered all of Brazil’s vast energy resources right here in America.” 

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alternatives  coal  domestic-energy  energy-policy  natural-gas  renewable  nuclear 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 21, 2011

At API, we've been saying for many years that the United States needs a broad portfolio of energy, including oil, natural gas, nuclear, coal, and a wide variety of alternatives such as solar and wind. Some are best used to generate electricity with the existing infrastructure, while oil is necessary to provide liquid fuels for transportation. 

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arkansas  biofuels  domestic-energy  energy-policy  gulf-of-mexico  jack-gerard  oil-and-natural-gas  oil-spill  renewable  solar  wind  geothermal-energy 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 25, 2010

Last Friday, API President and CEO Jack Gerard delivered a speech at the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Arkansas, describing the benefits of oil and natural gas to the American way of life and the economy. 

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