The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

regulation  blm34  methane  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2017

Last week we encouraged Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) technically flawed and redundant venting and flaring rule. It appears lawmakers are poised to do just that – concerned that the rule could discourage future energy investment on Indian and federal lands, where production trails output on state and private land, and that it risks negatively impacting supplies of affordable energy to American consumers and businesses. Good reasons all to axe BLM’s rule. Likewise, repeal would be responsive to the specific concerns of voices in the West, where vast acreages are under federal control.

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oil-and-natural-gas  economic-growth  access  regulation  epa34  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 13, 2017

As the Trump administration comes into office and the new Congress begins work, a sea-change is needed in the way Washington approaches American oil and natural gas abundance. It’s critically important for consumers, the U.S. economy and our country’s security. We need policies that embrace and harness America’s energy renaissance instead of trying to restrain it. We need an approach to regulation that manages safe and responsible energy development instead of smothering it in short-sighted, often unnecessary restrictions and red tape. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  access  consumers  regulation  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 10, 2016

Energy as the driver of a number of key public policy issues, and energy as a bipartisan antidote to Washington’s dysfunctions – both are seen in the results of an election-night survey of actual U.S. voters, results that should guide the next administration and the new Congress. 

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vote4energy  oil-and-natural-gas  access  regulation  hydraulic-fracturing  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2016

With Election Day a week away Kyle Isakower, API’s vice president for regulatory and economic policy, and Erik Milito, API upstream group director, held a conference call with reporters to reiterate the embedded nature of energy in a variety of national issues and the importance of selecting leaders at all levels of government who will advance pro-development energy policies.

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offshore-energy-development  safety-standards  safe-operations  regulation  oil-and-natural-gas  center-for-offshore-safety 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 28, 2016

Safe offshore energy development is a by-product of advanced technologies and equipment, an ever-expanding knowledge base, improved worker training, an effective partnership of industry and regulatory authorities, constantly improving standards for deepwater exploration and production and, over it all, an industry committed to creating and growing a culture of safety in offshore operations.

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oil-and-gas  renewable-fuel-standard  kentucky  regulation  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 25, 2016

As the United States’ third-largest coal-producing state, Kentucky gets about 87 percent of its electricity from coal-fired generation. Yet natural gas use is growing. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, net electricity generation from natural gas has grown more than 460 percent in Kentucky since 2006. Electricity generation is now the state’s second-largest natural gas consuming sector.

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natural-gas  emissions  epa34  carbon-dioxide  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 3, 2016

Some context for legal challenges to EPA’s final rule for new oil and natural gas sources, filed individually this week by a coalition of states, API and other organizations.

As we’ve noted before, methane emissions from field production of natural gas are falling – mainly because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, to deliver to customers. Industry is on it, deploying technologies and know-how to prevent emissions during production. Bottom line: In a period of soaring production, we’ve had falling methane emissions.

This is happening under the current regulatory regime.

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vote4energy  regulation  natural-gas  access  air-quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 21, 2016

Reducing government regulation found its way into a number of the speeches at the Republican Convention in Cleveland, and this is especially important to the future of America’s energy renaissance.

Along with cutting government red tape in leasing and permitting of energy projects, establishing a common-sense approach to energy regulation will help encourage the private investment and innovation that are driving the surge in domestic oil and natural gas production.

More on that below. First, remember that as the U.S. continues to lead the world in oil and gas production, we’ve seen economic benefits, cost savings for consumers, lower crude oil imports that have helped make America more energy secure and carbon emissions reductions that lead the globe.

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pipeline-safety  natural-gas  regulation  economic-impacts  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2016

We frequently post on the potential risk to U.S. energy production and the benefits the American energy revolution is generating for the economy and individual households from the administration’s regulatory push and government red tape (see herehere and here). There might not be a better current example of the potential regulatory impact on U.S. energy than new rules for natural gas transmission and gathering lines proposed by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

Consider: According to a study by ICF International, measuring the impact of PHMSA’s proposals, for 2,200 small pipeline companies across the country the annual cost of complying with the new regulations would come close to what the companies earn from gathering line fees. That’s impact – impact on small businesses and impact on energy development associated with the work those companies do.

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ozone  regulation  epa34  economic-impacts  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted June 15, 2016

To comply with standards approaching or below naturally occurring levels of ozone, states could be required to restrict everything from manufacturing and energy development to infrastructure projects like roads and bridges. Even if job growth were strong, saddling states with unachievable requirements would be questionable policy at best. In an economy still struggling to add jobs, new ozone regulations that impact such a wide range of job creators – and promise little to no public health benefit – make no sense.

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