The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

emission-reductions  co234  natural-gas  president-obama  environmental-impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 10, 2017

President Obama has a piece in Science magazine, that notes the “decoupling” of U.S. economic growth and energy-associated carbon emissions in recent years and largely attributes this new trend of growth and falling emissions to increased use of cleaner-burning domestic natural gas. … On this the president is singing our song (see here and here) – and he’s certainly welcome to do so.

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offshore-energy  arctic  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 21, 2016

We need to change our course on energy – in offshore policy and other areas – to benefit American consumers, U.S. businesses, our economy and the country’s energy security. Given the fact it takes years to realize the benefits of offshore energy development, the administration’s decision to shelve much of America’s offshore potential is devastatingly shortsighted, bordering on the irresponsible, in the face of projected increasing global demand for oil and natural gas. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  emission-reductions  climate  environmental-impact  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 11, 2016

Our ears perked up near the end of  when coal utility employee and instant celebrity Ken Bone asked Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump how their respective energy policies would meet the country’s energy needs while also protecting the environment and minimizing negative impacts on key job sectors. While political conversations generate their fair share of fact-checking, let’s do a little fact-setting.

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president-obama  natural-gas  climate  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 4, 2016

Interesting remarks from President Obama during the “South By South Lawn” event at the White House this week – with the president basically saying that the abundance and affordability of domestic natural gas is key to America’s energy present and future, even as he gave a nod to natural gas’ ongoing role in reducing U.S. carbon emissions. 

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pennsylvania  natural-gas  fracking  us-energy-security  president-obama  vote4energy 

Stephanie Catarino Wissman

Stephanie Catarino Wissman
Posted July 28, 2016

In Pennsylvania, the energy revolution has been very, very good to the commonwealth. Marketed natural gas production, which exceeded 4.5 trillion cubic feet in 2015, more than double output from just three years earlier:

Over the past half-decade, fees paid by industry to the commonwealth have totaled more than a billion dollars. Much of the money stays at the local level and is distributed to the counties and municipalities with the most shale wells. The top beneficiaries for 2015 included Washington County ($5.68 million), Susquehanna County ($5.25 million) and Bradford County ($4.92 million). Even in a down year for the industry, revenue to the commonwealth totaled $187.7 million.

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petroleum  president-obama  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  economic-benefits  access  fracking  infrastructure  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2016

Good to hear President Obama extolling some of the benefits of the U.S. energy revolution this week in North Carolina, starting with security and consumer benefits. Both are firmly linked to surging domestic oil production – which of course is why the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas output. The president:

“Remember when we were all concerned about our dependence on foreign oil? Well, let me tell you, we’ve cut the amount of oil we buy from other countries in half. Remember when the other team was promising they were going to get gas prices down in like 10 years? We did it. … So we have been able to shape an energy policy that’s good for families, good for your pocketbook.”

Indeed, producing more oil and gas here at home has had great impact on U.S. energy security and security overall. The United States is stronger in the world today because it is less dependent on others for imported energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), net imports stood at 4.6 million barrels of oil per day in 2015 – lower than any year since they were at 4.2 million barrels per day in 1985. EIA projects that in 2040 net crude imports will drop to about 1.5 million barrels per day.

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crude-oil  taxes  economic-impacts  consumers  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2016

The president’s $10 per barrel oil tax proposal has been out for about a week now, and the analysis from a number of experts – both in terms of politics and economics – could be boiled down to the social media acronym “smh,” which stands for “shaking my head.”

Political analysis first: “The president perennially proposes repealing the oil industry tax credits which Congress annually ignores,” Benjamin Salisbury at FBR Capital Markets toldBloomberg. “It seems overwhelmingly likely that this fee meets the same fate.” ClearView Energy Partners’ Kevin Book said there are “near-zero odds that the Republican-led Congress will grant the president’s request.”

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oil-production  oil-imports  us-energy-security  economic-growth  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 9, 2016

Progress on domestic oil production and oil imports is not something the United States should surrender – or worse, roll back. We should not pursue policies that take the United States back to the energy reality of a decade ago: the prospect of increasing dependency and less opportunity – for American workers, consumers, our economy and our strategic security.

Yet, that’s what the Obama administration is leading – a retreat from the progress that’s been made because of abundant shale energy reserves and the innovation and technology reflected in safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling.

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us-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-growth  american-energy-security  emission-reductions  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2016

It has been clear for months that the Obama administration has lost interest in a true “all-of-the-above” approach to the nation’s energy – one that is being led by surging oil and natural gas production right here at home. Consider:

Despite multiple State Department reviews filled with science showing that rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline would result in higher emissions, the president killed the project and the 42,000 jobs it would support during its construction phase. Despite the fact U.S. carbon dioxide emissions are near 20-year lows, the administration is pushing ahead with its Clean Power Plan that favors only certain kinds of renewable energy instead of letting states to freely choose lower-emissions sources while ensuring affordable and reliable energy for consumersAlthough methane emissions from natural gas production are dropping, EPA and the Bureau of Land Management are moving forward with additional layers of regulation that could raise the cost of natural gas production and chill investments needed to bring cleaner-burning gas to market. Despite bipartisan agreement that the Renewable Fuel Standard is a failure – that mandates for increasing ethanol use actually increases greenhouse gas emissions – EPA continues to push for more ethanol in the nation’s fuel supply.

The administration’s latest anti-energy revolution proposal is an ill-conceived plan to slap a $10-per-barrel fee or tax on crude oil that could increase the cost of a barrel of crude by 30 percent and add 25 cents to the price of a gallon of gasoline.

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american-energy  president-obama  state-of-the-union  oil-and-natural-gas-production  emission-reductions  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 21, 2016

It’s become a State of the Union tradition: President Obama touts the benefits of oil and natural gas production without identifying the American energy revolution as their source. This year, the president implied that government investments in wind and solar are the reason the United States has “cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly 60 percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

“Gas under two bucks a gallon ain’t bad, either,” he continued.

The New York Times was quick with a rebuttal, writing: “Private oil and gas companies, however, were a driving force behind the most important changes in the United States’ energy landscape over the past seven years: lower fossil fuel emissions and a reduction in dependence on imported oil. … A glut of domestic oil has helped lower prices and imports. The new supply of domestic natural gas has helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electric utilities have traditionally relied on coal as the cheapest fuel source, but turned to natural gas as it became cheaper.”

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