The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  ghg-regulations  policy 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted February 23, 2017

When the U.S. Senate returns to work, repealing the Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring rule” should be a top priority. The redundant and technically flawed rule, which went into effect last month, could negatively impact production – some say it already has. The House has voted for repeal under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), and the Senate should follow the House’s lead.

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rfs34  policy 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted February 23, 2017

The recent push to shift responsibility for compliance with the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), from refiners and importers to independent blenders and retail gasoline stations, is a flawed approach that could impact consumers at the gasoline pump and does nothing to fix the larger set of problems that plague the RFS – problems Congress must address by repealing the program or significantly reforming it. API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola discussed these issues during a conference call with reporters.

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policy  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 19, 2017

Late this month or in early February, let’s hope Congress uses the Congressional Review Act to fast-track the repeal of a number of the Obama administration’s late regulatory thrusts that could needlessly hinder domestic energy development.

A top priority for CRA repeal should be the so-called venting and flaring rule developed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that went into effect this week. BLM’s rule is technically flawed and redundant, and it could impede the technological innovations that have led to increased domestic use of cleaner-burning natural gas – the main reason U.S. energy-related carbon emissions have fallen to levels not seen since the early 1990s.

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colorado  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2016

These are the stakes: Whether Colorado and the nation will continue to safely develop natural resources for the good of all Americans, or whether development of oil and natural gas – which supply 67 percent of the energy we use today and which the U.S. Energy Information Administration projects will supply 68 percent of our energy in 2040 – will be thoughtlessly discarded, to the state’s and the country’s detriment.

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infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas  pipelines  policy  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 2, 2016

This wonderful domestic energy abundance and the global LNG market opportunities could be impacted by challenges facing infrastructure expansion here at home. America needs more energy infrastructure to move domestic supply to all areas of the country, for residential consumers, power generators and manufacturers. Yet, without stronger high-level backing, we could see these infrastructure needs delayed or rejected, as occurred last month with the proposed Constitution natural gas pipeline in New York.

Americans overwhelmingly support more energy infrastructure, and there appears to be bipartisan consensus for it in Congress. But infrastructure projects are being targeted by a vocal minority – even though increased domestic use of natural gas is the leading reason the United States is leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. A key going forward is gaining infrastructure support from the White House and the administration, said Marty Durbin, API’s executive director for market development.

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american-energy  policy  exports  lng34  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 24, 2015

Houston Chronicle (excerpt): Putin tips his hand with this dedicated focus on fracking, revealing just how much of a threat alternative energy sources pose to his control in Europe. "Energy is the most effective weapon today of the Russian Federation," Victor Ponta, the Romanian prime minister told the New York Times last year. "Much more effective than aircraft and tanks." This is the game that the United States can win if we choose to play. Exporting oil and gas poses one of the best opportunities to strengthen our allies in NATO and the European Union. The former Soviet Union provides more than 40 percent of Europe's oil. Russia has nearly exclusive control over natural gas supplies to the Baltic nations, which the United States has a duty to protect under the NATO charter. This level of control leaves our allies vulnerable to price shocks and supply cuts at the whim of an expansionist oligarch. Yet U.S. crude is still restricted by a 1970s-era export ban and the federal government drags its feet on approving liquified natural gas exports.

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american-energy  policy  growth  methane-emissions  keystone-xl-pipeline  taxes  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 13, 2015

EIA Today in Energy: The United States, Canada, China, and Argentina are currently the only four countries in the world that are producing commercial volumes of either natural gas from shale formations (shale gas) or crude oil from tight formations (tight oil). The United States is by far the dominant producer of both shale gas and tight oil. Canada is the only other country to produce both shale gas and tight oil. China produces some small volumes of shale gas, while Argentina produces some small volumes of tight oil. While hydraulic fracturing techniques have been used to produce natural gas and tight oil in Australia and Russia, the volumes produced did not come from low-permeability shale formations.

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american-energy  policy  biofuels  ethanol  rfs34  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 5, 2015

Denver Post Editorial: Yet another major environmental organization has concluded that biofuels, including ethanol, are a net detriment to the world — both in environmental and economic terms. The World Resources Institute (WRI) "recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson: do not grow food or grass crops for ethanol or diesel or cut down trees for electricity." Why? The group, based in Washington, D.C., says converting plants into fuel is a terribly inefficient use of land, can never produce a major portion of the world's supplies, and puts pressure on cropland that is needed to feed the world's growing population, among other things.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  trade  manufacturing  exports  policy  ethanol  rfs34  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 3, 2015

NPR: As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. Four-year college graduates are nearly twice as likely to have a job compared to Americans who just graduated high school and stopped there. But economists say that doesn't mean everybody needs a four-year degree. In fact, millions of good-paying jobs are opening up in the trades. And some pay better than what the average college graduate makes.

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ozone-standards  air-quality  economic-impacts  job-losses  epa-regulation  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2015

With EPA opening public hearings (subscription required) on its proposed new ground-level ozone standards, it’s important that we not let some key facts get lost in the wave of comments and anecdotes that results when there’s an open microphone available.

At issue is EPA’s plan to make more restrictive the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, from the current 75 parts per billion (ppb) to between 65 and 70 ppb. The agency is collecting input until mid-March before finalizing the rule this fall.

We’ve made the case before that the existing standards are working, that our air is getting cleaner and will continue to do so with the current rule. In short, there’s no good reason to make the standards more stringent. That’s what the science shows, as experts detailed at EPA’s hearing in Washington, D.C. (here and here). Indeed, EPA’s own data shows that ozone levels have fallen 33 percent since 1980, including 18 percent since 2000.

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