The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

north-dakota  pipeline-construction  bakken-shale  oil-and-natural-gas  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 13, 2016

The situation in North Dakota with the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) – with various groups trying to shut down construction of a legally permitted project that’s already 60 percent finished  – is about more than a pipeline, infrastructure needs, economic growth and job creation. It’s about more than U.S. energy security, which the project will strengthen. It’s about the rule of law in this country.

Read More

natural-gas  infrastructure  pipelines  pipeline-construction  jobs  new-york 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 25, 2016

During a speech last week to labor union officials, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo talked big about the need for big infrastructure in this country. Gov. Cuomo mentioned the building of the Erie Canal in the 1800s, the interstate highway system that was launched in the 1950s and the construction of big bridges. The North America’s Building Trades Unions audience cheered and clapped warmly when Cuomo called for the vision and leadership needed for America to once again build big infrastructure:

“We built this nation into the greatest nation on the globe with our hands and sweat. That was the American way. We were tough, we were gutsy, we were daring, and there was no challenge that we wouldn’t take on, and we built this country and we regained that spirit of energy and positivity and ambition. … We can do these big projects. We did do these big projects … The George Washington Bridge, the Verrazano Bridge, hundreds of miles of subway system under New York, an 80-mile aqueduct built in the 1800s just to get water to New York City. We never said no …”

The next day, Cuomo’s administration said no – to the proposed $683 million Constitution natural gas pipelineNo to infrastructure – privately financed at that. No to the construction jobs wanted by the folks who cheered the governor the day before. No to consumers in New York state, who’d benefit from abundant, clean-burning natural gas, piped into a number of the state’s southern counties from Pennsylvania’s Marcellus shale.

And some wonder why so many Americans are cynical about politicians.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  oil-production  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  arctic  oil-sands  pipeline-construction  offshore-oil-production  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

MarketWatch:  U.S. oil production is on track to reach an annual all-time high by September of this year, according to Rystad Energy.

If production does indeed top out, then supply levels may soon hit a peak as well. That, in turn, could lead to shrinking supplies.

The oil-and-gas consulting-services firm estimates an average 2015 output of 9.65 million barrels a day will be reached in five months — topping the previous peak annual reading of 9.64 million barrels a day in 1970.

Coincidentally, the nation’s crude inventories stand at a record 471.4 million barrels, based on data from U.S. Energy Information Administration, also going back to the 1970s.

Read More

oil-imports  refineries  eia34  energy-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  infrastructure  pipeline-construction 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 10, 2015

EIA Today in Energy: The increase in U.S. shale and tight crude oil production has resulted in a decrease of crude oil imports to the U.S. Gulf Coast area, particularly for light-sweet and light-sour crude oils. These trends are visualized in EIA's crude import tracking tool, which allows for time-series analysis of crude oil imported to the United States.

Historically, Gulf Coast refineries have imported as much as 1.3 million barrels per day (bbl/d) of light-sweet crude oil, more than any other region of the country. Beginning in 2010, improvements to the crude distribution system and sustained increases in production in the region (in the Permian and Eagle Ford basins) have significantly reduced light crude imports. Since September 2012, imports of light-sweet crude oil to the Gulf Coast have regularly been less than 200,000 bbl/d. Similarly, Gulf Coast imports of light crude with higher sulfur content (described as light-sour) have declined and have been less than 200,000 bbl/d since July 2013.

Read More

natural-gas-development  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-sands  innovation  pipeline-construction 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2014

New York Times: DENVER — An impassioned national debate over the oil-production technique known as fracking is edging toward the ballot box in Colorado, opening an election-year rift between moderate, energy-friendly Democrats and environmentalists who want to rein in drilling or give local communities the power to outlaw it altogether.

If they make the ballot in November, an array of proposals will be among the first in the nation to ask a state’s voters to sharply limit energy development. Some measures would keep drilling as far as a half-mile from Colorado homes. Others would give individual communities the right to ban fracking.

The ballot measures reflect the anxieties that have accompanied a drilling boom across the West. As drilling sites are built closer to playgrounds and suburban homes in communities along Colorado’s northern plains, residents and environmental groups have called for more regulation and have pushed for moratoriums on drilling.

But in a bellwether state like Colorado, where views on drilling vary as much as the geography, the measures could ignite an all-out battle involving oil companies, business groups and conservationists that pulls in millions in outside money, sets off a rush of campaign ads and spawns lawsuits for years to come. That is why Gov. John W. Hickenlooper and other Democratic leaders are working feverishly on a compromise that would give communities more control of energy development in their backyards while keeping the fracking issue off the ballot.

Read More

job-creation  keystone-xl  pipeline-construction  labor  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 16, 2014

Add the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) to the list of American working men and women who want President Obama to approve the Keystone XL pipeline for construction. The Washington Examiner reports that IBEW President Edwin Hill sent letters to a number of Democratic senators, urging the pipeline’s construction. The Examiner quotes from Hill’s letter:

“At a time when job creation should be a top priority, the KXL pipeline project will put Americans back to work and have ripple benefits throughout the economy. … From pipe manufactured in Arkansas, to pump motors assembled in Ohio and transformers built in Pennsylvania, workers from all over the United States will benefit from the project. … Although America is slowly recovering from the worst recession since the Great Depression, unemployment rates remain high, especially in the construction industry.”

Americans in the construction trades look at the Keystone XL as more than a job – it’s a lifeline for people who’ve seen their work recover slowly from the recent recession.

Read More

pipelines  pipeline-construction  pipeline-safety  oil-and-natural-gas  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 29, 2014

Take a look at the fuels and products delivered every day by America’s sprawling network of liquid petroleum and natural gas pipelines, and you’ll develop a new appreciation for energy infrastructure: gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and other fuels and natural gas and heating oil for our homes. Plus feedstocks to make products ranging from eyeglasses to pharmaceuticals. Pipelines are integral for modern living.

That’s why API’s recently launched “Pipeline 101” website is an important resource – to better understand the need for pipelines, as well as how they work, how safe they are and more.

Read More

infrastructure  energy-investment  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  pipeline-construction  storage-tanks 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 15, 2014

Last month a new study said more than $640 billion in energy infrastructure investments will be needed in the U.S. over the next two decades. Needed are pipelines, pumps and other infrastructure to keep pace with expected increases in domestic oil and natural gas production, the ICF International report said – much of it coming from energy reserves found in shale and other tight-rock formations through advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. ICF:

“Sufficient infrastructure goes hand in hand with well-functioning markets. Insufficient infrastructure can constrain market growth and strand supplies, potentially leading to increased price volatility and reduced economic activity.”

Read More

pipeline-construction  natural-gas-pipelines  infrastructure  regulatory-issues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 11, 2014

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, addressing a propane shortage currently affecting millions of consumers in the Northeast and Midwest at the National Association of State Energy Officials annual policy outlook conference last week:

“There’s a lot of day-to-day issues to be concerned about but we also want to keep this in a broader context. What we’re seeing played out is just one example of where our energy infrastructure isn’t quite ready for the task we have today.”

At the same conference, Roy Willis, president and CEO of the Propane Education Research Council, called propane the “canary in the coalmine” for the nation’s energy infrastructure needs. That canary certainly is singing out.

Read More