The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development  pipelines  permitting  regulation  energy-department  eia34  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 19, 2015

The issue was energy infrastructure – where the United States is and where things are headed. At the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference this week, one discussion honed in on the challenges to infrastructure approval and construction – as well as government’s best role in developing projects that are key to U.S. energy transport and overall energy security. The latter produced some friction between speakers not often seen at conferences like EIA’s. More below.

The U.S. Energy Department’s Melanie Kenderdine talked about some of the details in the department’s recently issued Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), which focused on ways to modernize the nation’s infrastructure.

Read More

analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  gasoline-price-factors  crude-markets  federal-leases  permitting  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 21, 2015

Consumers have felt some of the fruits of America’s energy revolution, API Chief Economist John Felmy told reporters in a pre-Memorial Day conference call

Felmy noted that drivers are paying about $1 less per gallon of gasoline on average nationwide than they did at this time a year ago, according to AAA. He said that thanks to advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. energy resurgence has offset production declines in other parts of the world, which has resulted in a more stable global market for crude oil – and relief at the gas pump. He added that the U.S. energy picture currently is characterized by strong domestic supply, moderate demand, increasingly efficient production and a refining sector that’s turning out record amounts of gasoline.

Felmy said the right energy choices by our country’s leaders can help continue the energy revolution.

Read More

access  interior-department  onshore-access  offshore-access  federal-lands  federal-revenues  leasing  permitting 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 2, 2015

Taking a look at the president’s new budget request for the Interior Department, we see the administration asking for $13.2 billion, an increase of nearly $1 billion over the enacted funding level for the current fiscal year.

Now take a look at data from Interior’s Office of Natural Resource Revenue, which tabulates federal revenues from energy developed in federal areas onshore and offshore.

It’s a lot of information, but check the bottom line: For fiscal year 2013, revenues from oil and natural gas developed in federal areas totaled about $12.9 billion. For FY2014 the total was about $11.7 billion. Federal revenues from oil and natural gas development in FY2014 were about $1.2 billion less than in FY2013.

Interestingly, the amount of lost revenue is just about equal to Interior’s requested budget increase for FY2016. In other words, Interior lost $1.2 billion in revenue from 2013 to 2014 and basically is looking to taxpayers to fill in the gap in the next budget. 

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  federal-lands  regulation  permitting  access  leasing  blm34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 15, 2015

Charting some of the latest Bureau of Land Management (BLM) data on federal oil and natural gas activity – which mostly shows continuing decline.

First, BLM issued fewer new oil and natural gas leases in fiscal year 2014 than in any year since FY1988. That year 9,234 new leases were issued, a number that fell to 1,157 in FY2014. Last year’s number was a retreat from FY2013, when 1,468 new leases were issued.

Other indicators also show declining oil and natural gas opportunity in areas controlled by the federal government.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  eia34  permitting  regulation  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 15, 2014

Three keys to a true, all-of-the-above energy policy: increasing access to U.S. energy reserves, implementing sound regulatory policies and creating an environment that fosters investment in energy innovation and development.

Government has an important role to play in all three. While it can’t create an energy revolution like the one occurring in the United States today, it can help sustain and grow it. Unfortunately, government also can hinder it – with limited vision, misplaced priorities and poor policy choices.

Thus, “architecture of energy abundance” remarks by U.S. Rep. Fred Upton at this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) energy conference are particularly timely.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  regulation  permitting  infrastructure  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 26, 2014

It’s good to see the U.S. House of Representatives advancing a true all-of-the-above energy strategy with legislation that would help increase access to domestic reserves, promote common-sense regulation and reasonable permitting policies, foster development of key energy infrastructure and capitalize on America’s energy superpower status.

All are elements in a working, all-of-the-above approach to energy. Combined with energy from coal, nuclear and renewables, increased development of American oil and natural gas and associated infrastructure will keep our economy and country running – today and tomorrow.

Read More

leasing-regulations  permitting  drilling  oil-and-natural-gas-development  energy-information-agency  blm34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 8, 2014

On Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a remarkable new projection showing that given certain conditions and with the right policies in place the United States could reach energy self-sufficiency within two decades. It’s the first time EIA has projected that net imports’ share of liquid fuels consumption could reach zero – basically, that domestic production would exceed imports. Key to EIA’s scenario: access to domestic reserves.

On Tuesday, new Bureau of Land Management data showed that if EIA’s projection is to be realized, a new approach to energy development on federal lands will be needed. BLM statistics show that leasing and permitting on federal lands in fiscal year 2013 both were down, hitting their lowest numbers in years. Also down: new wells drilled.

Read More

regulation  permitting  investment  keystone-xl-pipeline  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2014

During Tuesday’s State of American Energy address, API President and CEO Jack Gerard sketched out a more secure energy future for the United States – based on increased access to domestic oil and natural gas reserves, industry technology and ingenuity and a business/investment climate that allows development to go forward.

Let’s focus on that last part, which is less a request for government to do something than simply asking it to avoid hindering safe and responsible energy development through misguided policies and overreaching regulation.

Read More

permitting  leasing  exploration  energy-policy  energy  domestic-energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 22, 2012

t’s tempting – while contemplating a rebuttal to the latest claim that oil companies pay billions of dollars to “sit” on federal oil and natural gas leases in the Gulf of Mexico – to simply refer to previous rebuttals when the claim was made in 2009 and again last year.

Read More