The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl  pipelines  canada  security  oil-sands  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 12, 2015

Another postscript to the president’s unfortunate and shortsighted rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline last week: The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that as total U.S. crude oil imports decline, Canada’s share of the imports total is rising.

The data shows that in August 1995 the U.S. imported a total of 7.43 million barrels per day (bb/d), including a little over 1 million bb/d from Canada, about 13 percent of the total. In August this year U.S. oil imports were 7.63 million bb/d (down from a high of 10.7 million bb/d in June 2005), including 3.4 million bb/d from Canada, about 45 percent of the total. (At the same time imports from Venezuela, which produces a heavy crude similar to oil sands crude, have declined from 1.29 million bb/d in 2004 to 849,000 bb/d in August – no doubt, a result of increasing supply from Canada.)

What we see here is a snapshot of the strategically important growth in the United States’ energy partnership with Canada. Our neighbor and ally is our No. 1 source of imported oil – almost three times larger than imports from Persian Gulf countries.

Read More

analysis  keystone-xl-pipeline  hillary-clinton  crude-oil  jack-gerard  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

At some point during the past seven years the Keystone XL pipeline ceased to exist only as an important project of energy infrastructure – one that could generate jobs, economic growth and strengthen U.S. energy security – and became a symbol for a narrow ideological agenda, a political football the White House has endlessly punted around to suit its own political needs. Little surprise, then, that Hillary Clinton has decided to join in the KXL kicking.

Read More

analysis  keystone-xl  canada  oil-sands  economic-benefits  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 17, 2015

This Saturday marks a dubious anniversary: seven years since the first permit application was filed to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

Seven years!

Given the typical process for a federal cross-border pipeline approval, Keystone XL should have started pumping oil from Canada and the U.S. Bakken region years ago. For purely political reasons, Keystone XL has languished with the Obama administration for seven years now – denying significant energy, economic and national security benefits to the United States.

The months and years come and go, and yet American public support for Keystone XL has remained a constant – underscoring the political nature of the White House’s mishandling of the project. A new poll of registered voters found 68 percent of Americans want the pipeline built – compared to 21 percent opposed. The result is similar to this poll last fall as well as polls in April 2014, December 2013, April 2013, February 2012 and others. This is consensus. With the American people, Keystone XL is a settled issue.

Read More

analysis  oil-sands  ghg-emissions  heavy-crude  state-department  canada  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2015

A few observations on an Energy Department-funded study that reportedly asserts Canadian oil sands will yield significantly greater emissions than conventional crude oil. We say “reportedly,” because the study itself isn’t out yet, just the abstract. Even so, the Wall Street Journal breathlessly says the “findings provide ammunition to foes of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and other critics of surging Canadian oil output.”

Now, take a deep breath.

We’ve posted on this claim before. President Obama brought it up a couple months ago to justify more than six years of delaying a decision on the Keystone XL pipeline by the White House. Certainly, assigning alarming greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to oil sands boosts an anti-KXL, anti-oil sands position. But it’s a faulty comparison.

Read More

cera  exports  exxonmobil  horizontal-drilling  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  refineries  access  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 21, 2015

The theme of this year’s CERAWeek mega-conference in Houston is “Turning Point: Energy’s New World.” It is a new world, with the United States producing more energy from oil and natural gas – the lead fuels of the U.S. and the world’s economies – than any other country. Just a decade ago few could have imagined the possibilities. 

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  oil-production  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  arctic  oil-sands  pipeline-construction  offshore-oil-production  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

MarketWatch:  U.S. oil production is on track to reach an annual all-time high by September of this year, according to Rystad Energy.

If production does indeed top out, then supply levels may soon hit a peak as well. That, in turn, could lead to shrinking supplies.

The oil-and-gas consulting-services firm estimates an average 2015 output of 9.65 million barrels a day will be reached in five months — topping the previous peak annual reading of 9.64 million barrels a day in 1970.

Coincidentally, the nation’s crude inventories stand at a record 471.4 million barrels, based on data from U.S. Energy Information Administration, also going back to the 1970s.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  job-creation  economic-growth  oil-sands  trade  congress  president-obama  canada  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 15, 2015

Facts and science over politics. That’s the way energy policy should be made. Too many policy matters in the energy space are being hijacked by politics. The Keystone XL pipeline is one example, as are some of the regulatory initiatives the administration is pushing right now. That’s not the way to craft good energy policy.

Keystone XL has been stuck on the drawing board more than six years because it was turned into a political football by the White House. Cross-border pipelines like Keystone XL historically have gained approval in 18 to 24 months. We’re at 76 months and counting for political reasons, not because of compelling scientific and economic analysis – as advanced in the five reviews conducted by the U.S. State Department.

Keystone XL finally has reached the debate stage in the Senate, but the White House is threatening to veto legislation that would advance the project. More politics, more delay, more missed opportunity for American workers and U.S. energy security.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  economy  energy-security  environment  jobs  trade  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 9, 2015

The Hill: The Nebraska Supreme Court on Friday struck down a lower court's challenge to the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, handing a key victory to proponents of the project. The decision overturns a lower court's ruling that had sided with landowners challenging Keystone's path through Nebraska. The lower court said a 2012 law that allowed Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman (R) to greenlight the route was against the state's constitution.

Read More

domestic-energy-production  oil-and-natural-gas-development  congress  utah  oil-sands  keystone-xl-pipeline  new-york 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 2, 2014

U.S. News (Lamont Colucci): OPEC met on Nov. 27, and openly recognized that the United States' oil technological revolution – driven by enhanced oil recovery methods including hydraulic fracturing (known as fracking) and horizontal drilling – has undermined the cartel's economic and political power. This constitutes one of the major geopolitical and economic shifts of the 21st century in America’s favor. This meeting has been characterized as OPEC abandoning its role as a “swing producer” or simply the arbiter of oil supply and demand. Some are now suggesting that the new swing producer will be the United States.

Enhanced oil recovery technology was consistently denigrated as unworkable and unprofitable, and there will be many more articles restating this as the old wine in a new bottle. These technologies have made the U.S. the world's number one oil producer, surpassing Saudi Arabia and Russia. OPEC’s strategy of allowing the market to decide oil prices is designed to hurt American enhanced oil recovery activities, with the assumption that American producers need a higher profit margin per barrel than it does. This may be a horrible miscalculation on OPEC's part due to continual advances in technology and innovation.

According to a 2013 report, hydraulic fracking and horizontal drilling have the potential to increase the global reserve of oil from 1.6 billion barrels to 10.2 billion barrels. Domestically, we are already witnessing the 21st century oil boom generate prosperity for states like Colorado, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Texas, West Virginia and Wyoming. Current estimates indicate that by 2020 the United States will be the dominant worldwide producer of both natural gas and oil and achieve energy independence.

However, this energy issue has been dominated by the wrong people: economists, businessmen, engineers and environmentalists. They all have their required expertise, but all of this is really an issue of foreign policy and national security. There are four ways that this new situation can be welcomed by conservatives, liberals, realists and environmentalists.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  environment  energy-security  jobs  emissions  american-energy  economy  oil-sands 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 18, 2014

Ahead of the Senate’s vote this evening on legislation that would approve the Keystone XL pipeline project, the 1,779 mile oil pipeline project has dominated energy news today. While the Senate floor continues to see debate, and the vote looks very close, here’s what we’re reading:

Read More