The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  ghg-regulations  policy 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted February 23, 2017

When the U.S. Senate returns to work, repealing the Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring rule” should be a top priority. The redundant and technically flawed rule, which went into effect last month, could negatively impact production – some say it already has. The House has voted for repeal under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), and the Senate should follow the House’s lead.

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consumers  natural-gas  nuclear  connecticut 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 10, 2017

A pillar of a sound energy policy, nationally and in the states, is letting markets work. Let the marketplace and consumers determine an energy source’s viability – based on affordability, efficiency, usefulness and other market factors. Unfortunately, Connecticut is considering legislation that would go the other direction, providing market-distorting government subsidies for nuclear power generation that could negatively impact consumers.

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power-past-impossible  everything  oil34  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2017

API’s first-ever Super Bowl ad, announcing the launch of our new “Power Past Impossible” communications campaign, had a few folks online questioning the ad’s connection between oil and space exploration – questions we’ll show are off-base later in this post.

Confusion by some about oil and space flight actually points to the main thrust of the ad and the campaign: Natural gas and oil are much, much more than just fuels. Oil and gas are all around us – in paint, makeup, the components in bionic parts, life-saving medical technology, clean fuels, space suits and … rockets. When you start thinking about it, the list is virtually endless.

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regulation  blm34  methane  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2017

Last week we encouraged Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) technically flawed and redundant venting and flaring rule. It appears lawmakers are poised to do just that – concerned that the rule could discourage future energy investment on Indian and federal lands, where production trails output on state and private land, and that it risks negatively impacting supplies of affordable energy to American consumers and businesses. Good reasons all to axe BLM’s rule. Likewise, repeal would be responsive to the specific concerns of voices in the West, where vast acreages are under federal control.

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100-days  natural-gas  infrastructure  energy-policies  trump 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 26, 2017

The first 100 days of a new presidential administration present an opportunity to establish priorities that will guide government policy for the next four years. Maintaining and strengthening the U.S. advantage as the world’s leading producer and refiner of oil and natural gas should be a top focus – not only for our energy security but for the economic, national security and environmental benefits oil and natural gas reliably provide.

The American people have a firm understanding of the importance of oil and natural gas. Recent survey results reveal that more than 80 percent of voters agree that U.S. oil and natural gas production can help achieve each of their most important priorities: job creation, economic growth, lower energy costs and energy security.

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policy  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 19, 2017

Late this month or in early February, let’s hope Congress uses the Congressional Review Act to fast-track the repeal of a number of the Obama administration’s late regulatory thrusts that could needlessly hinder domestic energy development.

A top priority for CRA repeal should be the so-called venting and flaring rule developed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that went into effect this week. BLM’s rule is technically flawed and redundant, and it could impede the technological innovations that have led to increased domestic use of cleaner-burning natural gas – the main reason U.S. energy-related carbon emissions have fallen to levels not seen since the early 1990s.

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consumers  natural-gas  energy-costs  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 17, 2017

These reports are significant in a couple of ways. Lower natural gas prices obviously benefit consumers, and they also benefit when costs are lower for the leading fuel for electricity generation. In addition, our air is cleaner because cleaner-burning natural gas has reduced carbon emissions from the power sector to 25-year lows. Future U.S. energy policy should recognize these natural gas benefits and others – including lower costs for manufacturers and export opportunities – by fostering more domestic natural gas production.

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api34  natural-gas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 12, 2017

Modern hydraulic fracturing combined with horizontal drilling is the technological engine behind surging U.S. oil and natural gas output which, combined with smart, effective regulation has transformed the United States from a passive consumer on the world energy stage to a leader in only a decade’s time.

Late last year America’s Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) and the American Petroleum Institute (API) combined forces to highlight the role natural gas can play to ensure America’s energy security, create jobs, and provide the abundant and affordable energy consumers need all while providing environmental benefits.

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emission-reductions  co234  natural-gas  president-obama  environmental-impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 10, 2017

President Obama has a piece in Science magazine, that notes the “decoupling” of U.S. economic growth and energy-associated carbon emissions in recent years and largely attributes this new trend of growth and falling emissions to increased use of cleaner-burning domestic natural gas. … On this the president is singing our song (see here and here) – and he’s certainly welcome to do so.

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infrastructure  pipelines  natural-gas  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 20, 2016

With a new administration and a new Congress coming to Washington, Americans may hope for new policies to advance energy infrastructure construction in this country. Change is needed. Even though more than 80 percent of registered voters support additional infrastructure, and policymakers talk about it as a pressing national need all the time, a number of factors – including anti-progress activism and government red tape – delay, stall and/or threaten to block new pipelines and other essential energy projects. Forward-looking leadership will dismantle artificial impediments to safe development.

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