The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas  economic-benefits  emission-reductions  consumers  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 3, 2016

Let’s follow up on a post earlier this week on the energy stakes in next week’s election with some recent analysis by Adam Sieminski, who heads the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Speaking at a Natural Gas Roundtable event, Sieminski said that constraints on hydraulic fracturing, reducing its use, could have significant price impacts. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  consumers  climate  emission-reductions  manufacturing  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 21, 2016

Check out our new video below, highlighting the benefits of American energy to individual consumers, businesses and entire sectors of our economy. Let’s underscore a few of the points in the video. First, American energy is boosting the economy, helping manufacturers and other businesses create jobs and opportunity.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  economic-benefits  manufacturing  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2016

As is the case with any tradable commodity, selling U.S. natural gas outside this country promotes domestic jobs and economic growth. Expanding demand for U.S. natural gas in global markets through LNG exports will result in increased domestic investment, enhanced GDP growth, rising incomes and more well-paying jobs. At the same time, U.S. LNG exports will expand global natural gas markets – enhancing U.S. influence to encourage transparency and fair market rules while strengthening relationships with our allies.

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alabama  oil-and-natural-gas  emission-reductions  manufacturing  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 26, 2016

The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas. It has made the U.S. more energy secure, added jobs, lifted the economy and lowered energy costs for American households. The increased use of natural gas – illustrated in Alabama – is the chief reason the U.S. leads the world in reducing energy-related carbon emissions. All are byproducts of the U.S. energy revolution.

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natural-gas  natural-gas-pipelines  economic-growth  manufacturing  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 3, 2016

Two more data sets underscore the positive economic impact of America’s energy revolution and the relevance of the U.S. model of concurrent energy and economic growth, consumer benefits and climate progress.

First the consumer benefits part. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that Americans’ cost of living is lower since June 2014, thanks to reduced household energy costs because of decreases in crude oil and natural gas prices. (Right here we’ll add that increased U.S. oil and gas production is a key driver in these declines that are benefiting consumers.)

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news  american-energy  innovation  investment  fracking  shale-energy  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 25, 2015

CNN (Petraeus and Bhayani) – Fracking. 3D printing. Personalized medicine. Big data.

Each is a compelling technological trend. And taken together, advances in energy production, manufacturing, life sciences and IT amount to four interlocking revolutions that could make North America the next great emerging market -- as long as policymakers in this country don't impede their potential.

The impact of these four revolutions is already evident in the enviable economic position enjoyed by Canada, Mexico and United States compared with the rest of the world.

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news  energy-exports  crude-oil  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  arctic  innovation  manufacturing  offshore-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 20, 2015

The Wall Street Journal (Leon Panetta and Stephen Hadley): The United States faces a startling array of global security threats, demanding national resolve and the resolve of our closest allies in Europe and Asia. Iran’s moves to become a regional hegemon, Russia’s aggression in Ukraine, and conflicts driven by Islamic terrorism throughout the Middle East and North Africa are a few of the challenges calling for steadfast commitment to American democratic principles and military readiness. The pathway to achieving U.S. goals also can be economic—as simple as ensuring that allies and friends have access to secure supplies of energy.

Blocking access to these supplies is the ban on exporting U.S. crude oil that was enacted, along with domestic price controls, after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. The price controls ended in 1981 but the export ban lives on, though America is awash in oil.

The U.S. has broken free of its dependence on energy from unstable sources. Only 27% of the petroleum consumed here last year was imported, the lowest level in 30 years. Nearly half of those imports came from Canada and Mexico. But our friends and allies, particularly in Europe, do not enjoy the same degree of independence. The moment has come for the U.S. to deploy its oil and gas in support of its security interests around the world.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  trade  manufacturing  exports  policy  ethanol  rfs34  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 3, 2015

NPR: As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. Four-year college graduates are nearly twice as likely to have a job compared to Americans who just graduated high school and stopped there. But economists say that doesn't mean everybody needs a four-year degree. In fact, millions of good-paying jobs are opening up in the trades. And some pay better than what the average college graduate makes.

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american-energy  taxes  exports  jobs  economy  manufacturing  fracking  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 13, 2015

Forbes (Mark P. Mills): It was predictable. Oil gets cheap and now there’s a contingent in Congress looking to slap a new tax onto gasoline. What’s surprising is that there are some conservatives in both Congress and the pundictocracy also receptive to the notion, including the estimable Charles Krauthammer. It’s a terrible idea. Instead of raising taxes, the Congress should be focused on helping the industry that created the oil glut, and that nearly single-handedly sustained the U.S. economy through the recovery from the Great Recession: America’s shale producers who are now subject to nearly unprecedented foreign market manipulation.

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fracking  heating-oil  jobs  manufacturing  keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 6, 2015

Cleveland.com: Cold January weather has arrived, but rates for natural gas have fallen. Both Dominion East Ohio and Columbia Gas of Ohio are posting standard rates that are lower than those in December and lower than year-ago January prices. These standard rates change monthly because they are linked to the monthly gas commodity contracts traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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