The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  innovation  technology  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 7, 2016

The degree to which industry innovation and advanced technology is driving America’s energy renaissance is a good-news story that doesn’t get enough attention. Let’s see if we can take a step in that direction.

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hydraulic-fracturing  ghg-emission-reduction  regulations  drinking-water  energy-production  horizontal-drilling  carbon-emissions 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted June 9, 2016

Competitive forces and industry innovation continue to drive technological advances and produce clean-burning natural gas, which has led to reducing carbon emissions from power generation to their lowest level in more than 20 years, making it clear that environmental progress and energy production are not mutually exclusive.

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consumer-products  natural-gas-benefits  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 22, 2015

What would the holidays be without energy? Sure, you could still roast your chestnuts – provided you had an open fire. And you still might find your way around on a dark, foggy night – with help from a certain reindeer. But in many cities and towns things would be significantly less jolly and less festive, even if it looked like snow.

Enter energy – and more specifically, natural gas.

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analysis  hydraullic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  water  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

A new EnergyFromShale.org video shows the relatively tiny amount of water needed to develop U.S. energy with safe hydraulic fracturing – the chief reason (along with advanced horizontal drilling) that the United States now is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas

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analysis  epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  water  shale-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 4, 2015

After five years and millions of taxpayer dollars, EPA says what we in industry and others have said for some time: Safe hydraulic fracturing doesn’t threaten our drinking water. The salient quote from EPA’s draft report about fracking and associated operational components:

“We did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States.”

EPA’s findings discredit scaremongering used by fracking opponents and should help focus attention where industry is and has been focused – on continuous improvements in operational skill, guided by a set of rigorous best practices, and on technological advances.

EPA’s findings also effectively endorse the strong environmental stewardship that is being exercised by state regulators, who have been busy while EPA studied.

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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  access  texas  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 28, 2015

We often call the United States a global energy superpower, and it is – No. 1 in the world in the production of petroleum and natural gas hydrocarbons in 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

This is the result of an ongoing energy revolution, harnessing vast oil and natural gas reserves found in shale and other tight-rock formations, thanks to advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. America has the energy and the technologies, but also the robust industrial sector necessary to completely rewrite our country’s energy story.

Here’s another way to look at it: A number of individual U.S. states now rival the world’s major energy-producing countries. In other words, as separate countries those states would be world leaders in energy output.

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encana  analysis  shale-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  unconventional-oil  unconventional-gas  canada  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  economic-growth  investments  technology-innovation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2015

Encana President and CEO Doug Suttles participated in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s CEO Leadership Series last week with a luncheon address and a Q&A session with Linda Harbert of the Institute for 21st Century Energy. Highlights of the conversation below. Suttles joined Alberta-based Encana as president and CEO in June 2013. He has 30 years of oil and natural gas industry experience in various engineering and leadership roles. Before joining Encana, Suttles held a number of leadership posts with BP, including chief operating officer of BP Exploration & Production and BP Alaska president.  

Q: You opened your talk by saying I’m a North American energy company. … Can you shed a little light on the differences and similarities between operating in Canada and the U.S.?

Suttles: They’re not as big as many people would think. First of all, in the places we operate – Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi, and then Alberta and British Columbia – these are all natural resource states, and they understand that and I think the people and political leaders understand the importance, too. Both countries have high environmental expectations.

Probably the biggest difference you’d really see between them is the remoteness of operations, which creates a unique challenge in Canada. Many of our operations are away from large towns and cities … But you have an environment where I think people understand the benefits of our industry. They promote the industry, they support it.

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cera  exports  exxonmobil  horizontal-drilling  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-industry  refineries  access  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 21, 2015

The theme of this year’s CERAWeek mega-conference in Houston is “Turning Point: Energy’s New World.” It is a new world, with the United States producing more energy from oil and natural gas – the lead fuels of the U.S. and the world’s economies – than any other country. Just a decade ago few could have imagined the possibilities. 

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  eia-forecast  imports  economic-growth  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2015

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new Annual Energy Outlook for 2015 contains a number of stats, charts and projections, but you could boil them down to a couple of important points.

First, oil and natural gas are and will continue to be the foundation of an all-of-the-above energy approach that’s key to continued U.S. economic growth, energy security and overall security. EIA says oil (36 percent) and natural gas (27 percent) supply 63 percent of America’s energy now, and EIA projects they will supply 62 percent in 2040 (oil 33 percent and natural gas 29 percent). This is because oil and natural gas are high in energy content, portable and reliable. They’re the workhorse fuels of the broader economy, making modern living possible as fuels and as the building blocks for a number of products Americans depend on every day. America is and will be dependent on a variety of energies, but oil and natural gas are and will play leading roles.

The great news is the U.S. is in the midst of a revolution in domestic oil and natural gas production, leading to a second big takeaway from EIA’s report – that domestic output is and will continue to reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  domestic-energy-access  eia34  offshore-energy  onshore-development  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

Statistics in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Monthly Energy Review for March show U.S. domestic energy production meeting about 89 percent of the country’s total energy demand. That’s up from 84 percent in 2013 and 2012 and reflects a key result of the domestic energy revolution: growing U.S. self-sufficiency.

EIA data shows U.S. energy production as a percentage of total demand. Total energy production (fossil fuels, nuclear electric power and renewables – again, as a percentage of total U.S. energy demand -- was about 69 percent in 2005, and it grew to about 89 percent last year. The share of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) accounted for approximately 55 percent in 2005, growing to about 70 percent last year.


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