The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  methane  epa34  emission-reductions  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-energy  greenhouse-gases 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 4, 2015

Part of the U.S. success in reducing greenhouse gas emissions is the significant drop in emissions of methane, the primary component in natural gas, from development operations. Since 2005, methane emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells have plummeted 79 percent – with technology and innovation allowing industry to capture more of a product that can be delivered to consumers. This has occurred even as U.S. natural gas production has steadily climbed, thanks to shale, safe fracking and horizontal drilling.

It’s a shining chapter in a success story that shows how free market forces have taken the lead in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in this country. In turn, the U.S. is leading the world in reducing GHG emissions.

No matter. Despite these advances, EPA is proposing additional methane regulations on oil and gas wells and transmission. Unfortunately, more regulation could mean less – less fracking, less energy and, quite possibly, less progress in reducing emissions.

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climate  greenhouse-gases  greenhouse-gas-mitigation  co2-emissions  president-obama  oil-and-natural-gas-development  american-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 20, 2015

More unhelpful talk from the administration directed at America’s energy industry – strange, given the key role played by the oil and natural gas industry in the nation’s recovery from recession, in reducing oil imports, in making the U.S. more secure in the world and in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, all on the current administration’s watch.

It’s not that some in the administration haven’t noticed these positives. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell at CSIS this week:

“… it’s no coincidence that our economic recovery has been accompanied by the biggest energy transformation of our lifetimes. The energy revolution we experienced in these last six years helped spur the recovery, but it’s also been accelerated by the policies our country put in place. Since 2008, American oil production has surged, from 5 million to 9 million barrels a day. And our dependence on foreign oil has fallen to its lowest level in more than 30 years. … These shifts in U.S. energy markets aren’t marginal or temporary. They are tectonic shifts …”

... Yet, in a recent interview President Obama talked about energy companies and climate change in adversarial, unproductive tones – echoing other administration messaging lately that borrows from the activist community. Like that messaging, these recent remarks are divorced from reality.

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regulation  greenhouse-gases  california  diesel  gasoline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 23, 2014

On Jan. 1, California is scheduled to include gasoline, diesel and propane in its three-year-old, first-in-the-nation program that requires companies to buy carbon permits to cover their emissions of greenhouse gases. Yet a new report warns that design flaws in the cap-and-trade program could negatively impact markets that serve consumers.

Authored by Jean-Philippe Brisson, a carbon markets expert with the Latham and Watkins law firm in New York, the report commissioned by the Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA) cautions that design flaws “can result – and have resulted – in catastrophic implications for environmental markets around the globe.”

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methane-emissions  greenhouse-gases  regulation  epa34  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2014

New York Times columnist Joe Nocera has a new piece that calls for federal regulation of methane emissions from oil and natural gas production and distribution. Reducing methane emissions is a good idea – and industry has been doing it for years – which makes talk of new regulatory regimes seem odd.

Voluntarily, industry efforts have reduced methane emissions from fracked natural gas wells 73 percent since 2011, according to recent EPA data. That’s actually a fantastic number – one that parallels EPA’s greenhouse gases inventory showing a nearly 40 percent decrease in overall methane emissions from 2006 to 2012 – while natural gas production grew 37 percent.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  methane  epa34  greenhouse-gases 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2014

Environmental groups want more regulation targeting methane emissions from oil and natural gas production. While this is what environmental groups often do, the new methane alarm is especially curious given the fact situation.

This is reflected in the dramatic decline in emissions of methane (CH4) from 2006 to 2012, according to EPA’s Inventory of Greenhouse Gases  – 39.4 percent to be exact. This occurred while natural gas production was growing 37 percent during the same time period, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

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epa34  ethanol  greenhouse-gases  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl  taxes-impact-on-business  energy-taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 16, 2013

LA TimesEPA: U.S. Greenhouse Gases Drop 

The newspaper highlights the latest good news from the EPA: Increased use of natural gas, much of it developed with  hydraulic fracturing, has helped the United States lower its greenhouse gas emissions 1.6 percent from 2010 to 2011 and nearly 7 percent since 2005.

Roll CallRedford: Keystone XL an Environmentally Sound Way to Enhance Energy Security

Alberta  Premier Alison Redford’s  op-ed argues that Canada is “the safest, most secure and responsible energy supplier to the United States and a reliable trading partner.” This comes after her recent visit to the U.S. advocating  approval of the Keystone XL pipeline project.  Approving the pipeline “is the choice of reason,” she writes.

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greenhouse-gases  emissions  investment  natural-gas  environmental-expenditures 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 14, 2012

A new API report estimates that the U.S. oil and natural gas industry has invested more than $252 billion trying to improve the environmental performance of its products, facilities and operations since 1990 – about 65 percent of that directed toward cleaner air and water.

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energy-policy  environmental-protection-agency  epa34  ghg34  ghg-emissions  greenhouse-gas-emissions  greenhouse-gases  over-regulation  greenhouse-gas-regulations 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted December 13, 2010

A federal appeals court has rejected a motion for a partial stay of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations, clearing the way for the rules to take effect on Jan. 2.

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clean-air-act  domestic-energy  energy-policy  environmental-protection-agency  epa34  ghg34  greenhouse-gas-emissions  greenhouse-gas-regulations  greenhouse-gases  climate-change-policy  emission-reductions 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 10, 2010

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today took two significant steps toward its proposed greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations for stationary sources. It released guidance to help states and local permitting agencies implement controls on GHGs, and it issued "white papers" to refineries, power plants, pulp and paper mills and other industries outlining the Best Available Control Technologies (BACT) that can be used to reduce GHGs. 

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