The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

jack-gerard  infrastructure  hurricane-harvey  hurricane-response  gasoline-prices  hurricane-irma 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 8, 2017

With the impacts of Hurricane Irma still to be seen, today’s energy infrastructure network, innovations, technology and knowledge appear to have gained from past big-weather events allow some cautious optimism. That’s the conclusion of a pair of energy experts who briefed reporters during a conference call designed to provide context to the efforts of industry and communities to meet the challenges of a major storm.

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consumers  gasoline-prices  oil-production  crude-oil-prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 26, 2017

Nationally, the average price of a gallon of gasoline the third week of July was $2.392 – about 42 percent lower than the national average price at the same time in 2008, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Retail gasoline prices haven’t been “sticky,” as Sen. Charles Schumer said on ABC’s “This Week,” suggesting that some sort of anti-Adam Smith force has kept them from decreasing. Yet, as we can see, they have decreased significantly over a time period that coincides with accelerated U.S. crude oil production (thanks, fracking).

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consumers  gasoline-prices  energy-costs  emission-reductions  energy-exports  access  infrastructure 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 28, 2016

Despite occasional policy obstacles, the U.S. energy revolution continues to enhance America’s economic and national security and deliver major benefits to consumers, the environment and manufacturers. With commonsense, market-based, consumer-focused energy policies, the new Congress and incoming administration can maintain and extend our global energy leadership.

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consumers  energy  oil-and-natural-gas  gasoline-prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 23, 2016

Historically and culturally, Thanksgiving is this country’s calendar cue to be thankful, to be grateful, from household to household. As President Lincoln said in his 1863 proclamation creating the holiday, it’s a day to recognize the “blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies.” This year is no different. Americans can give thanks for a number of things. The American Farm Bureau Federation tells us that the average cost of a Turkey Day feast for 10 this year is $49.87, a 24-cent decrease from last year’s average. (Alas, there’s no reported decrease in the remorse a number of us will feel from feasting a bit too much.)

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crude-oil-exports  gasoline-prices  consumers  domestic-oil-production  eia34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Looking back, the weight of scholarship and analysis had predicted that, rather than cause higher pump prices here at home as some claimed, exporting domestic crude would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices. In fact, that’s what we’re seeing – abundant crude oil supply benefiting American consumers. U.S. crude exports are part of that market dynamic – while also helping to support domestic production and strengthening America’s balance of trade.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  gasoline-prices  epa34  economic-impacts  e1534 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2016

When you head out for your Memorial Day drive, consider the current price of gasoline – the U.S. average retail price of $2.30 a gallon, which the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says is 47 cents lower than at the same time last year and the lowest average price just before a Memorial Day weekend since 2009. 

Now, let’s all thank the U.S. energy revolution, which is playing a big role in consumer benefits, like those seen at the pump. EIA notes that lower gasoline prices reflect lower crude oil prices. And the global crude market wouldn’t be where it is without higher U.S. crude production. 

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affordable-energy  american-energy-security  co2-emissions  consumer-products  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-benefits  gasoline-prices  energy-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 25, 2015

Thanksgiving is about taking a moment to give thanks for our good fortune. A festival of gratitude with food, family and friends – maybe with a little football thrown in.  So here's a list of some of the things that we’re thankful for this holiday season, from A to Z.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  gasoline-prices  congress  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2015

An important step forward this week for legislation to end America’s outdated, 1970s-era ban on domestic oil exports: passage of the bill by a U.S. House subcommittee. Next a full committee vote and, perhaps before too long, a vote by the entire House. Yet, challenges remain.

No doubt the full Energy and Commerce Committee debate will be more vigorous. But that doesn’t diminish this week’s historic progress on lifting the export ban – a true relic from America’s energy past.  “This has been a long day coming,” said Rep. Joe Barton of Texas, the bill’s author.

As Barton explained, we’re at this point largely because of America’s energy revolution – the surge in domestic oil and natural gas production resulting from American innovation, technology, shale reserves and hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  american-petroleum-institute  gasoline-prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2015

API has a pair of new ads that drive home the economic and national security reasons for lifting America’s 1970s-era ban on exporting domestic crude oil

Here’s the national security spotClick here for the ad that underscores the job and economic reasons for lifting the ban. 

The television and online campaign launched this week in a dozen states – including Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Virginia – and the District of Columbia. The campaign is part of a broader push emphasizing the importance of updating U.S. energy policies to reflect America’s rise as a global energy superpower.

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analysis  crude-oil  gasoline-prices  energy-exports  lng34  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 4, 2015

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that the average retail price for regular gasoline on Aug. 31 was $2.51 per gallon – the lowest price for the Monday before Labor Day since 2004 and 95 cents lower than the Monday before Labor Day last year. EIA explains:

Declines in crude oil prices are the main driver behind falling U.S. gasoline prices. Lower crude oil prices reflect concerns about economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing actual and expected growth in global crude oil inventories.

Certainly, the global markets for a variety of commodities may be influenced by concerns, feelings and inklings of one kind or another. Let’s focus on the tangible reason EIA cites for lower global crude prices – hence, lower prices at U.S. pumps: growth in global crude oil inventories. That refers to production and supply to the market. The story behind that story is that over the past six or seven years, the United States has led the world’s top suppliers of petroleum and other liquids in production and rate of production growth.

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