The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

climate  economic-growth  electricity  energy  fossil-fuels  greenhouse-gas-emissions  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 11, 2016

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual energy conference is under way in Washington, D.C.  Here are a few highlights from the first slate of speakers, which included John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, and Gregory Goff, Tesoro Corporation president and CEO.

Holdren went first, saying that the driver of technology in the future will be finding solutions to what he called the energy/climate challenge:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there’s no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth."

Read More

heating-fuels  consumer-products  natural-gas  oil34  electricity  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 6, 2015

Last month we connected he lowest pre-Labor Day gasoline prices in more than a decade with the global cost of crude oil, the main factor in prices at the pump. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) attributed crude prices, in part, with growth in global supply – due in no small part to increases in U.S. oil production. Abbreviated: Thanks, U.S. energy revolution.

Now comes EIA’s Winter Fuels Outlook, with forecasts that household heating costs will be lower than the previous two winters. Thanks again, U.S. energy.

Read More

analysis  energy-tomorrow  energy-information-administration  energy-outlook 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 21, 2015

America’s energy strategy, short-term and long-term, is the sum of inputs: resource and production data, policy goals, technology, market conditions and more. These underpin the national conversation about the energy future of the United States and prospects for energy security – today, tomorrow and down the road.

Using federal energy information data we’ve launched a new website, Our Energy Tomorrow. It’s an interactive web experience that allows visitors to explore a variety of energy futures, based on inputs they select – including resource availability, advances in technology and federal legislation. These in turn generate a number of useable, shareable charts, graphs and trend lines that illustrate the energy scenario chosen.

Read More

analysis  energy-information-administration  fuels  income  oil-and-natural-gas  jack-gerard  state-of-american-energy  wood-mackenzie 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2015

This weekend our country celebrates 239 years of independence, as well as our collective belief in equality and unalienable rights – enumerated in the Declaration of Independence as “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Heading into Independence Day 2015, it’s fitting to draw some connections between American energy and American life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Today: life.

It’s hard to imagine modern life – in America or anywhere else for that matter – without liberal access to energy. It’s fundamental to sustaining life as we know it, while also providing fundamental opportunity to people across the globe for whom life is a daily struggle.   Let’s take a look at some charts from Max Roser’s Our World In Data project.  First is global energy use, with energy use starting to grow slowly around the 1900 and then taking off after World War II.

Read More

news  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  epa34  arctic  lng-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  energy-information-administration  massachusetts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 17, 2015

The HillA new Republican bill introduced Tuesday would completely repeal the federal mandate to blend ethanol into the nation’s gasoline supply.

Sen. Bill Cassidy’s (R-La.) legislation would completely do away with the renewable fuel standard, which first took effect in 2005 and now requires increasing levels of ethanol and biodiesel to be put into traditional fossil fuels.

The mandate invites frequent criticism from Republicans, the oil industry and sectors that complain the demand it creates for corn ethanol increases agricultural prices.

“Workers, refiners, producers, farmers and ranchers across the country are affected by the renewable fuel standard,” Cassidy said in a statement. “More mandates mean less jobs. It means families are paying more for gas and groceries.”

Read More

crude-oil  energy-information-administration  oil-and-natural-gas-access  shale-energy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 11, 2014

Earlier this week the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) blew back a lot of folks’ hair with the high oil-production scenario in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook – projecting for the first time ever that the net import share of U.S. petroleum and other liquids could reach zero. By 2037. That’s amazing considering that less than a decade ago the import share was nearly 60 percent.

Next from EIA: New data on growing U.S. crude oil and lease condensate reserves – more evidence of the ongoing U.S. energy revolution.

Read More

energy-outlook  access  domestic-oil-production  imports  energy-information-administration  fracking  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2014

Take a good look at the chart below – brand-new from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The green line disappearing into the horizontal axis between the years 2030 and 2040 is what U.S. energy self-sufficiency looks like.

This is a big, big deal – a goal of every U.S. president since Richard Nixon more than 40 years ago: the point where domestic production exceeds imports, which EIA never included in any of its projections. Until now.

Because of surging tight-oil production – oil from shale and other tight-rock formations, developed with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – the agency is including in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook a high-production scenario under which net imports would reach near-zero between 2030 and 2040.

Read More

energy-101  security-and-access  access  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 18, 2013

Great question during the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s annual energy conference this week – paraphrasing: Given the technologies, the innovation and risk-taking that mark today’s oil and natural gas industry, what‘s the ceiling for oil and gas development over the next few decades? The U.S. Geological Survey’s Donald Gautier took a crack at it:

“Every time I look at world oil or gas resources, I start adding things up, and I end up with enormous numbers. It just seems like an unavoidable fact, and the issue is about human activities and the contraptions they’re using for getting this out. There is certainly no shortage of molecules out there.”

Read More

access  crude-oil  energy-information-administration  oil-supply  energy-101  economy  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2013

Increasing U.S. domestic production of oil matters. Energy Information Administration (EIA) chief Adam Sieminski had this analysis at an energy conference earlier this week (h/t Breaking Energy):

“There’s a fairly significant, long-standing relationship between spare production capacity in OPEC and what the pricing environment is for oil. So the 2 million barrel per day  increase in U.S. oil production that surprisingly took place over the last five years has resulted in higher OPEC spare capacity, and undoubtedly, has been a factor in why Brent oil prices are $103-$104/bbl rather than $125-$130/bbl.”

Read More

ethanol  fracking  groundwater-protection  energy-information-administration  natural-gas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 16, 2013

Breaking Energy Sieminski: U.S. Tight Oil Growth Helping Lower Global Crude Price

U.S. tight oil production has helped to shave about $20-$25 per barrel from Brent crude oil prices, and continued output growth could  further impact global pricing, says  Energy Information Administration Administrator Adam Sieminski.

E! Science NewsGroundwater Unaffected by Shale Gas Production in Arkansas

Duke University and U.S. Geological Survey scientists sampled 127 shallow drinking water wells in areas overlying Fayetteville Shale gas production in north-central Arkansas and found no ground water contamination from hydraulic fracturing.

Read More