The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  carbon-dioxide  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 18, 2018

There’s talk about reducing greenhouse gas emissions – and then there’s taking steps to produce measurable results. The United States is in the second category, with the natural gas and oil industry playing the leading role.

Two charts from the American Enterprise Institute’s Mark J. Perry help illustrate: First, using data gleaned from BP’s Statistical Review of Global Energy, Perry shows that the U.S. led the world in reducing carbon dioxide emissions in 2017.


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natural-gas  electricity  cera 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 8, 2018

The CERAWeek conference turned its attention to the nation’s electricity system, with lots of talk about renewables, power storage, wholesale markets and the like. Most interesting was Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Rob Powelson’s calling out of states that have adopted or are considering anti-natural gas policies. Check it out in my latest CERAWeek update.

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natural-gas  electricity  electric-grid 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted February 13, 2018

There are important reasons natural gas is the United States’ primary fuel for electricity generation – and will be in the years to come, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA): 1) Natural gas is abundantly available – thanks to America’s energy renaissance; 2) Natural gas’ affordability has made it competitive in the marketplace; and 3) Among all the fuels used for power generation, natural gas is the definition of reliability – uniquely positioned as a fuel to furnish key attributes that ensure the health of the modern electricity grid.

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natural-gas  infrastructure  consumers  heating-fuels  electricity  massachusetts  connecticut  rhode-island  vermont  new-hampshire  maine 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 24, 2018

There’s a new data point from New England that underscores the region’s lack of sufficient natural gas infrastructure. A new study from ISO New England finds there’s a better than 80 percent chance that some or all of the region faces rolling blackouts in the near future – chiefly because it can’t get enough natural gas when there’s peak winter demand. For a country that leads the world in natural gas and oil production, having an entire region at the mercy of cold weather pretty much ranks as a national embarrassment – the kind of thing that happens in under-developed parts of the world. 

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electricity  natural-gas  infrastructure  pipelines  electric-grid  prices 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 12, 2018

U.S. infrastructure promises to be a top priority for the Trump administration in 2018. In his State of American Energy keynote address, API President and CEO Jack Gerard highlighted how resistance to infrastructure development has left New Englanders with some of the highest electricity costs in the nation, particularly so through extreme winters. 

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natural-gas  consumers  electricity  infrastructure  lng34  pipelines 

Todd Snitchler

Todd Snitchler
Posted January 5, 2018

America, the most prosperous, energy-rich country in the world, shouldn’t leave any of its citizens at the mercy of freezing conditions, potentially risking human tragedy, when the solution is literally right below our feet.

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natural-gas  emission-reductions  electricity  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 11, 2017

There’s a remarkable reality – among the many benefits of abundant, cleaner-burning domestic natural gas – that mustn’t be lost in the political back-and-forth over this week’s EPA decision to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP): The U.S. is achieving CPP’s objectives for reducing power sector carbon emissions – without CPP’s implementation.

It’s true: Reductions of U.S. CO2 emissions from electricity generation are well on their way to surpassing EPA’s estimate that CPP would lower CO2 emissions 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. And it’s being done without CPP, thanks largely to market forces driving the increased use of natural gas in power generation.

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ohio  natural-gas  consumers  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 5, 2017

Ohio voters continue to oppose bailouts for nuclear plants. As a statewide poll showed this summer, a new poll by API Ohio shows big opposition to a proposal to let nuclear plant owner FirstEnergy charge its customers a special fee to increase funding for its plants in three counties that are near FirstEnergy’s headquarters and its Davis-Besse and Perry nuclear plants. The opposition in Lake, Summit and Ottawa counties is bipartisan and huge.

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hurricane-response  hurricane-harvey  electricity  energy  jack-gerard  refineries  safety 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 31, 2017

The Gulf Coast area impacted by Hurricane-Tropical Storm Harvey faces a long recovery road, with thousands displaced and so many neighborhoods and workplaces inaccessible due to floodwaters. Humanitarian relief efforts are under way, but there’s much work to be done. While Americans across the country are concerned about the human toll left by Harvey, we’re particularly mindful of thousands of colleagues in the natural gas and oil industry who work and live in affected areas.  In that light, it’s a glimmer of good news that a few of the refineries forced to shut down because of the storm are starting the complex process of restarting – six as of Thursday morning, according to the U.S. Energy Department, with a combined capacity of more than 1.2 million barrels per day or about 4.2 percent of total U.S. refining capacity.

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natural-gas  electricity  solar-energy  wind-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2017

In 2017, it would be hard to find very many people who don’t know about Monday’s big solar outage. Here’s hoping everyone safely enjoys the eclipse in all its wonder – while also absorbing what this dramatic sun interruption teaches about the need for reliable energy in our daily lives. And that lesson is that natural gas is the every-day essential partner – partner, not backup – to intermittent energy sources like solar because, as will be underscored on Eclipse Monday, the sun doesn’t always shine.

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