The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  oil-imports  energy-exports  eia-forecast 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2017

Sometime in the mid-2020s, U.S. energy officials project, two key lines measuring energy imports and exports will cross, and the United States will have achieved something quite special – the advent of an era in which America is a net energy exporter. That’s one of the big projections contained in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s newly released Annual Energy Outlook for 2017 (AEO2017).

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  eia-forecast  imports  economic-growth  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2015

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new Annual Energy Outlook for 2015 contains a number of stats, charts and projections, but you could boil them down to a couple of important points.

First, oil and natural gas are and will continue to be the foundation of an all-of-the-above energy approach that’s key to continued U.S. economic growth, energy security and overall security. EIA says oil (36 percent) and natural gas (27 percent) supply 63 percent of America’s energy now, and EIA projects they will supply 62 percent in 2040 (oil 33 percent and natural gas 29 percent). This is because oil and natural gas are high in energy content, portable and reliable. They’re the workhorse fuels of the broader economy, making modern living possible as fuels and as the building blocks for a number of products Americans depend on every day. America is and will be dependent on a variety of energies, but oil and natural gas are and will play leading roles.

The great news is the U.S. is in the midst of a revolution in domestic oil and natural gas production, leading to a second big takeaway from EIA’s report – that domestic output is and will continue to reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy.

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eia-forecast  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2013

A few words of support for Adam Sieminski and his professional team at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). When it comes to collecting data about our energy past, analyzing trends and projecting future energy supply and demand, no one does it better than EIA. Which is why reported grousing over EIA’s forecasts for renewable energy raise an eyebrow, or two.

POLITICO picks up on the grousing in Sieminski’s response to an earlier letter from some groups, in which it’s clear some in the environmental community are concerned that EIA’s renewable projections are lower than recent growth trends. Again, from Sieminski’s response, some have suggested that EIA’s projections haven’t been grounded in science.

EIA has a reputation for calling them as it sees them, so the complaint is a little surprising

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oil-sands  natural-gas  keystone-xl  energy  eia-forecast  domestic-energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 26, 2012

Interesting piece by the Washington Post’s Robert Samuelson, analyzing America’s energy future in light of new government figures showing increased domestic oil and natural gas production:

“Despite big gains in energy efficiency and increases in ‘renewables’ (wind, solar, biofuels), fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of America’s energy system for years. In 2010, fossil fuel represented 83 percent of U.S. energy consumption, with oil at 37 percent, natural gas at 25 percent and coal at 21 percent. Although total energy use grows only 10 percent between 2010 and 2035, the fossil-fuel share stays high at 77 percent in 2035. Oil is 32 percent, natural gas 25 percent and coal 20 percent.”

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