The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

100-days  carbon-dioxide-emissions  economy  environment  hydraullic-fracturing  marcellus-shale 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 20, 2017

Natural gas is a winner – for U.S. consumers, the economy and the environment. Quick, somebody tell officials in New York state – where they continue to ban hydraulic fracturing, the key to unlocking vast natural gas reserves located right under New Yorkers’ feet, to the benefit of New York consumers, New York job-seekers and New York’s environment.

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oil-and-gas  security  production  us-energy  economy 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 24, 2016

The United States is a global energy leader, thanks largely to technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. America’s energy leadership has proven successful in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening national security and keeping prices low for consumers. 

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carbon-emissions  economy  energy-regulations  greenhouse-gas-emissions  ohio  oil-and-natural-gas  safety  shale-energy  texas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 12, 2016

The sound approach to energy regulation in the U.S. – one that provides appropriate oversight to oil and natural gas development without unnecessarily impeding progress – continues to be a major theme at the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference in Washington.

Tesoro President and CEO Gregory J. Goff raised the point with his Day 1 keynote speech, calling for transparency, fairness and accountability in federal regulation:

“Consumers, companies and the economy all benefit when government policies are well-reasoned and balanced. America is blessed with an abundance of affordable, reliable energy. It must not be squandered. Allowing the forces of the free market to operate will continue to benefit society. Government should be a facilitating partner in this positive economic force, not a roadblock to it.”

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economy  exxonmobil  exxon  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 6, 2016

Energy for the betterment of all. Sounds simple enough, yet the foundational role energy plays in creating opportunity for better, healthier lives, security and freedom must not be taken for granted.

America’s energy revolution is driving economic growth. It’s benefiting individuals and families with reliable, lower-cost fuels. It’s building national security and strengthening the United States’ stature in the world. Our energy renaissance also is at the heart of lowering carbon emissions to near 20-year lows, which is letting the U.S. lead the word in CO2 emissions reductions. No, we mustn’t take that for granted.

ExxonMobil Chairman and CEO Rex W. Tillerson touched on these points during a speech this week at the U.S. Energy Association’s annual meeting and policy forum, which honored him with its 2016 annual award. Tillerson underscored the need for policies and actions to sustain and grow the U.S. energy revolution, for creating broader access in the world to energy’s benefits and noted the energy sector’s leadership in advancing climate goals.

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crude-oil-exports  spr34  government-revenues  economy  jobs  eia34  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 27, 2015

Reports by Bloomberg and others say that White House and congressional budget negotiators would sell oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to partially pay for their new budget agreement. Sales would total 58 million barrels from 2018 to 2025, according to a draft House bill (see Section 403-a).

How much money would be raised from the sales would depend on prices at the time of the sales. But, if the goal is generating revenue for government to fund worthy projects, rather than a series of one-time sales, why not lift the ban on U.S. crude oil exports and create an annual revenue stream?

According to a study by ICF International (Page 86), ending the 1970s-era oil exports ban would lift the U.S. economy, create jobs – and generate significant additional revenue for government. A number of other studies mirror ICF’s findings on the economic benefits from lifting the export ban. We highlight ICF here because its estimate of additional oil production from lifting the ban (up 500,000 barrels per day) is almost identical to the output increase estimated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (470,000 barrels per day). ICF:

Federal, state, and local governments benefit from crude oil exports both in terms of the generation of GDP, which is then taxed at these levels, but also through royalties on federal lands where drilling takes place. Total government revenues, including U.S. federal, state, and local tax receipts attributable to GDP increases from expanding crude oil exports, could increase up to $13.5 billion in 2020.

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analysis  nevada  economy  ozone-standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 2, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Nevada. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Louisiana and Rhode Island. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Nevada, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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american-energy  fracking  economy  energy-security  innovation  efficiency  pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 1, 2015

Wall Street Journal (Holman W. Jenkins Jr.): If not for fracking, oil would probably be $200 a barrel and gasoline $6.50 in the U.S. Western economies would likely be in free fall. The grudging U.S. recovery would be in retreat. The modest and possibly illusory green shoots seen in Europe, largely a function of cheap oil and a strong dollar, would wither. Japan would be even more of a write-off than it already is.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  atlantic  fracking  gulf-coast 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 30, 2015

EIA Today in Energy: U.S. crude oil production (including lease condensate) increased during 2014 by 1.2 million barrels per day (bbl/d) to 8.7 million bbl/d, the largest volume increase since recordkeeping began in 1900. On a percentage basis, output in 2014 increased by 16.2%, the highest growth rate since 1940. Most of the increase during 2014 came from tight oil plays in North Dakota, Texas, and New Mexico where hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling were used to produce oil from shale formations.

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american-energy  lng-exports  exports  economy  fracking  new-york  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 27, 2015

LNG Wold News Blog: Dominion said it has celebrated with its international business partners and Maryland community leaders the construction of the Dominion Cove Point LNG liquefaction project. Kenichiro Sasae, the Japanese ambassador to the United States, and Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan joined Dominion Chairman Thomas F. Farrell II at the ceremony, along with Diane Leopold, president, Dominion Energy; Kazuhiro Takeuchi, president, CEO, and general manager for the Americas, Sumitomo Corp of Americas; Jayanta Sinha, president, GAIL Global U.S.A., and Steven R. Weems, president, Calvert County Board of County Commissioners.

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american-energy  exports  maryland  fracking  geothermal  wind  economy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 26, 2015

ExxonMobil Perspectives Blog: Lawmakers in Maryland are considering legislation to extend the de facto ban on hydraulic fracturing put in place by former Governor Martin O’Malley. Specifically, Annapolis currently is considering a proposal to ban the practice in the state’s portion of the Marcellus Shale for at least three years. This would be a bad idea for Maryland for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is the fact that natural gas has played an increasingly larger role in the state’s energy mix in recent years. Meanwhile coal has become increasingly less important.

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