The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  ghg-emission-reduction  regulations  drinking-water  energy-production  horizontal-drilling  carbon-emissions 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted June 9, 2016

Competitive forces and industry innovation continue to drive technological advances and produce clean-burning natural gas, which has led to reducing carbon emissions from power generation to their lowest level in more than 20 years, making it clear that environmental progress and energy production are not mutually exclusive.

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domestic-energy  drinking-water  energy-policy  environmental-protection-agency  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas  rhetoric-vs-reality 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 4, 2011

On Monday, Feb. 28th, we told you about our concerns over The New York Times articles on natural gas drilling and drinking water. As you might recall, the Times criticized the handling and disposal of drilling waste water, implying that natural gas operations might be harming water supplies in several Northeastern cities. The Times offered no solid facts to back up its assertions.

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domestic-energy  drinking-water  energy-policy  fracking  groundwater  halliburton  horizontal-drilling  hydraulic-fracturing  technology  water-quality  contamination  fracing  natural-gas-fracking 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted December 21, 2010

In today's episode, I interview David Adams, Halliburton's vice president for production enhancement, about hydraulic fracturing. He describes the fracking process, the associated benefits as well as the exaggerated risks. 

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drinking-water  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 29, 2009

Did you know that hydraulic fracturing has been used in about one million oil and natural gas wells in the United States? This tried-and-true process injects wells with water, small amounts of chemicals and sand to create tiny cracks in hard rock, allowing natural gas and/or oil to flow up the wellbore. Fracking, as it's often called, occurs thousands of feet below aquifers containing fresh water, and water supplies are protected by state well construction and drilling regulations. 

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