The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

offshore-energy  arctic  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 21, 2016

We need to change our course on energy – in offshore policy and other areas – to benefit American consumers, U.S. businesses, our economy and the country’s energy security. Given the fact it takes years to realize the benefits of offshore energy development, the administration’s decision to shelve much of America’s offshore potential is devastatingly shortsighted, bordering on the irresponsible, in the face of projected increasing global demand for oil and natural gas. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  alaska  arctic  access  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 21, 2016

America’s energy renaissance has propelled the United States to world leadership in oil and natural gas production. It’s historic and timely, given the fact oil and gas supplied 65 percent of the energy the U.S. used in 2015 and are projected to supply 67 percent of the energy we use in 2040 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Put another way: Oil and natural gas are and will continue to be America’s foundational fuels – because of their abundance, portability and high energy content – yet all other energy sources are and will play important roles as well. All of the above.  

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alaska  oil-and-natural-gas  arctic  beaufort-sea  chukchi-sea  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 12, 2016

Last week’s discovery of 6 billion barrels of oil in Alaska’s Smith Bay, which would increase the state’s reserves 80 percent, underscores the need for the United States to continue safe development of its Arctic resources.

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arctic  alaska  offshore-energy  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 30, 2016

Thanks to America’s shale energy revolution, the United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas. The revolution has generated economic lift, increased American security in the world and benefited U.S. trade. Surging natural gas production and use is the main reason the U.S. leads the world in reducing carbon emissions.

These are all great developments for U.S. energy and for our country in general. And Americans recognize it, 73 percent of registered voters in a recent Harris Poll saying they support a national energy policy that ensures safe and responsible development of a secure supply of abundant, affordable and available energy. To get there you must have arobust, forward-looking U.S. offshore oil and natural gas leasing program. Access to domestic energy reserves is fundamental to domestic energy production.  

Unfortunately, the next five-year leasing program now being written by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) falls short in the vigor and vision departments.

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offshore-development  oil-and-natural-gas  safe-operations  alaska  arctic  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 20, 2016

Near year’s end the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is scheduled to release its offshore oil and natural gas leasing program for 2017-2022.

For more than a year BOEM has methodically worked to craft a program that will blueprint offshore development into the next decade and beyond, developing drafts, receiving comments from the public as well as inputs from elected officials in affected states.

With the United States emerging as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, planning America’s offshore oil and gas development has never been more important. The United States must have an offshore oil and natural gas program that reflects America’s energy superpower status.

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offshore-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas  boem  access  arctic  gulf-of-mexico 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 11, 2016

Some points for the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to consider when it meets next week to review the Obama administration’s proposed 2017-2022 program for offshore oil and natural gas leasing.

First, offshore oil and natural gas production historically has played a major role in overall U.S. energy output. In 2010 more than 30 percent of U.S. oil and 11 percent of U.S. natural gas was produced in the Gulf of Mexico. So, while it’s great that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates  that Gulf production will increase to record high levels in 2017, every American must recognize that reaching record Gulf output next year would result because of leasing decisions made a decade or more ago.

In that context, let’s be clear: The federal offshore leasing program must reflect energy leadership and vision, and it must be focused on fostering opportunity. It must not reduce America’s offshore energy potential by keeping key offshore areas off the table for development.

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offshore-energy  boem  atlantic-ocs  arctic  ocs-leasing-plan 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 27, 2016

BOEM’s DC meeting that followed others this month in New Orleans, Houston and a number of localities in Alaska, was an information smorgasbord. They had a video overview of the methodology in developing the leasing program that will guide offshore energy development from 2017 to 2022. They also had a number of tables with printed handouts, where BOEM staffers were available to talk about topics ranging from protected species to the human environment to acoustics in the water.

I asked a staffer if it was possible that someone knowing little to nothing about offshore energy and leasing could wander into BOEM’s meeting, watch the video, absorb the information handouts, talk to BOEM representatives and then submit an informed comment on the leasing proposal. “Yes,” he said. Neat.

BOEM had a number of laptops set up to receive electronic comments. I submitted mine the old-fashioned way, writing them out longhand on a form. I labored to print legibly.

Certainly, BOEM has been meticulous in developing its proposed leasing program. The final version that will come out early next year will say a lot about U.S. energy leadership and vision and the future of American energy. That’s how critically important our offshore reserves are.

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offshore-energy-development  offshore-leasing  gulf-of-mexico  alaska  arctic  atlantic-ocs 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 23, 2016

The Obama administration’s decision last week to eliminate the Atlantic from the next federal offshore leasing plan is a step backward for American energy policy. Despite bipartisan support in Congress and from voters in coastal states, the administration is doubling down on a shortsighted policy that keeps 87 percent of federally controlled offshore acreage off limits to energy exploration.

Expanding access to America’s energy resources – both offshore and onshore – is vital to our future energy security and economic growth.

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crude-oil-exports  crude-oil-production  access  arctic  alaska  security  regulation  leasing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 22, 2015

Recent reports assert that some of the world’s oil suppliers have had a strategy to curtail the U.S. energy revolution – and that the strategy has worked, citing U.S. Energy Information Administration data showing U.S. production in decline. Bloomberg this week:

After a year suffering the economic consequences of the oil price slump, OPEC is finally on the cusp of choking off growth in U.S. crude output. The nation’s production is almost back down to the level pumped in November 2014, when the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries switched its strategy to focus on battering competitors and reclaiming market share.

Market decisions by major suppliers certainly have impact. Yet, focusing attention on factors beyond U.S. control misses factors under U.S. control that have a clear bearing on the trajectory of domestic oil production, economic growth and American security.

We’ll name a couple: continuing the outdated ban on U.S. oil exports and regulatory and process roadblocks that limit access to energy reserves and production. What we have is an administration whose self-sanctioning approach to U.S. energy is hurting American competitiveness in the global marketplace, to the benefit of other producers.

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analysis  alaska  arctic  beaufort-sea  chukchi-sea  income  oil-and-natural-gas  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulations  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 30, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Alaska. We started the week with a look at North Dakota. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Alaska, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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