The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

section-1504  securities-and-exchange-commission  american-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 1, 2017

The Congressional Review Act (CRA) was enacted so Congress could address flawed federal regulations like the Section 1504 disclosure rule promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Thankfully, lawmakers are wasting no time in using CRA to repeal this anti-competitive, harmful provision.

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refineries  refining-capacity  refining-crude-oil  fuels  american-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 31, 2017

One of the most technologically advanced industries in the world, the U.S. refining sector is the essential link between America’s crude oil wealth and the fuels and countless consumer products we depend on every day.

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refinieries  refining-crude-oil  fuels  american-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 24, 2017

Amid the volume of good news emanating from America’s energy renaissancelower consumer costs, economic growth, increased energy security, environmental progress and more – let’s also recognize that these benefits wouldn’t be realized without the key contributions of the U.S. refining sector.

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas  american-petroleum-institute  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 4, 2017

The Twitter-sphere did a good job reflecting many of the key messages from API’s annual State of American Energy event in Washington: economic growth, jobs, collaboration, solution-finding and bipartisanship.

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vote4energy  alternative-energy  american-energy  renewable-alternatives  research-and-development  everything 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 18, 2016

The oil and natural gas industry’s continuous quest for new technologies and innovations – ensuring energy supplies that are affordable, reliable and better for the environment – makes support for renewable energy projects across the U.S. and around the world a good fit within an all-of-the-above energy strategy. 

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american-energy  president-obama  state-of-the-union  oil-and-natural-gas-production  emission-reductions  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 21, 2016

It’s become a State of the Union tradition: President Obama touts the benefits of oil and natural gas production without identifying the American energy revolution as their source. This year, the president implied that government investments in wind and solar are the reason the United States has “cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly 60 percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

“Gas under two bucks a gallon ain’t bad, either,” he continued.

The New York Times was quick with a rebuttal, writing: “Private oil and gas companies, however, were a driving force behind the most important changes in the United States’ energy landscape over the past seven years: lower fossil fuel emissions and a reduction in dependence on imported oil. … A glut of domestic oil has helped lower prices and imports. The new supply of domestic natural gas has helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electric utilities have traditionally relied on coal as the cheapest fuel source, but turned to natural gas as it became cheaper.”

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state-of-the-union  american-energy  president-obama  oil-and-natural-gas-development  environmental-impact  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 12, 2016

During his last State of the Union address, President Obama could declare victory – an energy victory that has seen surging domestic production, lower consumer costs, economic growth and environmental progress, all happening together, on his watch. The president can say this U.S. model is winning the day, because it is. He should say this model is exportable to the world, because it is.

Fact: The U.S. is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas. The domestic revolution in the production of oil and gas has reduced net oil imports and positioned the U.S. to claim its place as a major player in global energy markets. At the same time, the U.S. is leading the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Fact: Affordable natural gas – the average price at the national benchmark Henry Hub in 2015 was the lowest since 1999 – is largely the reason wholesale electricity prices at major trading hubs (on a monthly average for on-peak hours) were down 27 percent to 37 percent across the U.S. last year compared to 2014. That’s a real benefit for consumers.

Fact: Natural gas is winning in the marketplace. This is reflected in data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration showing the change in annual U.S. energy consumption by fuel source over the past decade.

These are all characteristics of the U.S. model, a market-driven model for energy growth, consumer benefits and climate progress. The president can own it. We wouldn’t mind a bit.

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news  american-energy  innovation  investment  fracking  shale-energy  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 25, 2015

CNN (Petraeus and Bhayani) – Fracking. 3D printing. Personalized medicine. Big data.

Each is a compelling technological trend. And taken together, advances in energy production, manufacturing, life sciences and IT amount to four interlocking revolutions that could make North America the next great emerging market -- as long as policymakers in this country don't impede their potential.

The impact of these four revolutions is already evident in the enviable economic position enjoyed by Canada, Mexico and United States compared with the rest of the world.

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analysis  economic-benefits  canadian-oil-sands  trade  american-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 5, 2015

OK, so EPA says safe hydraulic fracturing isn’t a threat to the nation’s drinking water. That’s great news for America’s energy revolution, which is being driven by advanced fracking and horizontal drilling. Without them there’s no revolution and certainly fewer jobs and less economic opportunity. Thanks, EPA, for following the science and recognizing – as industry has for some time, producing specific best practices for fracking – that the focus should be on continually improving safe operations and advancing technologies. These will help ensure our energy revolution goes forward.

Now, let’s talk about another country’s energy revolution – one that hasn’t gotten a lot of attention in the U.S. beyond the unfortunate, protracted debate over the Keystone XL pipeline. Canada’s own energy revolution is at the heart of the U.S.-Canadian relationship and is so integral to U.S. security. The vitality of Canadian energy is something more Americans should care about, as it bears directly and indirectly on our lives in a number of ways.

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analysis  american-energy  infrastructure  pipelines  regulation  arctic  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 7, 2015

Oil & Gas Journal: North American businesses and governments must work together toward the collective goal of advancing the continent’s energy aspirations. That was the message delivered by producers and government officials during a May 5 panel discussion at the Offshore Technology Conference in Houston.

The US and Canada represent two of the world’s top five oil producers, and Mexico hopes to ramp up its production in the coming years once its energy reforms are fully realized.

Gustavo Hernandez Garcia, general director of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), said a primary challenge faced by his country is rising technical commercial complexity including deepwater, heavy oil, unconventional, and LNG. To attract the players capable of developing these resources, Mexico must offer attractive contractual and fiscal terms; transparent and clear roles for regulators and operators; an agile and competitive national oil company; and minimal political intervention, he said.

Pemex benefits from its geographic proximity to major producers and their unique skillsets in the US. Paula Gant, deputy assistant secretary for oil and natural gas in the Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy, said there’s “a tremendous need” to build on public data, statistics, and mapping in North America; for modern and resilient infrastructure; and for best practices for unconventional oil and gas.

Gant emphasized the necessity of constant and clear communication among government agencies in the three countries, and boasted that the US is “the envy of the world” with its existing natural gas pipeline system. Building out infrastructure and sustaining output growth in the US also relies on public confidence, she noted, adding that the office of oil and gas at DOE “provides scientific base from which politicians can make decisions.”

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