The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

crude-oil-exports  economic-growth  jobs  white-house  ghg-mitigation-technologies  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted October 8, 2015

These things are true:

  • The U.S. gets the majority of its energy from oil and natural gas, and is projected to continue to do so for decades.
  • Since 2005 U.S. production of natural gas is up 43 percent.
  • Since 2008 U.S. production of crude oil is up 88 percent.
  • U.S. air quality continues to improve, with concentrations of carbon monoxide down 60 percent, ozone down 18 percent, lead 87 percent, nitrogen dioxide 43 percent, particulate matter 35 percent and sulfur dioxide 62 percent since 2000.
  • The federal U.S. budget deficit for FY2015 was $435 billion.
  • The U.S. trade deficit rose in August as exports hit a three-year low.
  • Since 2008 our working age population has grown by over 16 million, while employment is up 8.5 million, leaving the U.S. at odds with trends in other countries.
  • U.S. poverty and wages are stagnant, and it is getting harder for people to move beyond a minimum-wage job.
  • Americans' trust in the federal government's ability to handle domestic problems has reached a new low.

These things are true, and thus, when presented with bipartisan legislation to reduce consumer fuel costs and the trade deficit while increasing U.S. investment, domestic crude oil production, GDP and government revenues and creating good paying jobs – all via U.S. crude oil exports – the White House obviously had no choice but to … threaten to veto it.


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api-standards-program  industry-standards  energy-development  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas  government-revenue  community  exploratory-well 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted July 9, 2014

Hydraulic fracturing is a proven, safe technique that has been used since 1949 in over one million wells right here in the U.S. As a result, America is now the number one producer of natural gas in the world, and by 2015, it is expected that we will take the top spot in crude oil production. Of course, with this success, come both benefits and challenges.

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exports  china  natural-gas 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted June 11, 2014

Having read the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) report, “Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States,” published on May 29, 2014, we are puzzled by the skewed conclusions reached by the Washington Post

That U.S. exports of LNG to China could end up being worse from a greenhouse gas perspective than if China simply built a new power plant and burned its own coal supplies.”; and that “the benefits of cleaner, more efficient combustion of natural gas are largely offset by methane leakage in U.S. production and pipelines and by methane leaks and energy used in the process of liquefying and transporting the LNG.”

A correct reading of the report reaches a completely different conclusion. After accounting for all the methane leakage factors mentioned by the Post, the NETL study clearly demonstrates that life cycle GHG emissions from LNG exports from the U.S. are significantly less than emissions from coal generated electricity in China and in Europe. 

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energy-reality  american-energy  alternative-energy 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted January 21, 2014

The Washington Post had an interesting article last week on a letter sent by 18 environmental groups to the White House.  Interesting because it shows the extreme disconnect between their acknowledgement of reality and their demands.  First the reality, from their letter:

“We understand that the U.S. cannot immediately end its use of fossil fuels and we also appreciate the advantages of being more energy independent.”

This is a huge, and welcome, admission of the energy reality that oil and natural gas provide and will continue to provide the energy the American people and American economy need. energy reality


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keystone-xl  energy-policy  energy  domestic-energy  access 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted September 5, 2012

In this time of stubborn unemployment, jobs are number two on the list of top policy priorities for the American people. This is why it is easy to get angry about the jobs lost by the administration’s decision to say no to the Keystone XL pipeline, a pipeline that would end up delivering around 700,000 barrels of oil per day by 2020.

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access  anwr  demand  domestic-energy  energy-policy  federal-lands  gulf-of-mexico  keystone-xl  liquid-fuel  offshore-drilling  onshore-drilling  supply  taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted August 27, 2012

Ridiculing a New York Times editorial blog is like shooting unusually large fish in a barrel, but this one from last Friday is so fantastical and extreme that a commitment to an honest debate on energy compels me to fire away.  And we don’t have to go far to start the fact check, as they lead with:

"The simple truth, as President Obama has recognized, is that a country that holds less than 3 percent of the world’s reserves but consumes more than 20 percent of the world’s supply cannot drill its way to energy independence."

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taxes  tax-deductions  subsidies  spr34  renewable-energy  energy-taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted April 2, 2012

Update: The author has changed the article, without noting so. Original article hereThe new article suffers from many the same problems in that it fails to note that the majority of the money involved is through government efforts to lower prices in developing countries.  As the IEA notes ending this support will shift "the burden of high prices from government budgets to individual consumers…" and that “…low-income households are likely to be disproportionately affected by the removal…”

We see a lot of false arguments about “subsidies” for the oil and natural gas industry, but this tweet caught us by surprise...

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taxes  offshore-drilling  natural-gas  liquid-fuels  gulf-of-mexico  domestic-energy  anwr  access 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted March 16, 2012

Yesterday President Obama gave a campaign speech centered around energy policy.  In it he said:

“There’s a problem with a strategy that only relies on drilling and that is, America uses more than 20 percent of the world’s oil.  If we drilled every square inch of this country -- so we went to your house and we went to the National Mall and we put up those rigs everywhere -- we’d still have only 2 percent of the world’s known oil reserves.  Let’s say we miss something -- maybe it’s 3 percent instead of two.  We’re using 20; we have two.  Now, you don’t need to be getting an excellent education at Prince George’s Community College to know that we’ve got a math problem here.  I help out Sasha occasionally with her math homework and I know that if you’ve got two and you’ve got 20, there’s a gap.  (Laughter.)  There’s a gap, right?”

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access  anwr  crude-oil  domestic-energy  liquid-fuel  oil34  oil-supply  onshore 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted March 13, 2012

Opponents of increased domestic oil production like to portray the U.S. as being helpless in the face of worldwide events.  This argument sometimes takes this form:

… with only 2% of the world’s oil reserves, we can’t just drill our way to lower gas prices – not when consume 20% of the world’s oil.

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