The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  emission-reductions  methane  blm34 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2017

America’s oil and natural gas industry supports commonsense regulation, but a duplicative Bureau of Land Management (BLM) rule regulating methane emissions is a solution in search of a problem. … Fortunately, the Interior Department has “flagged” the rule “as one we will suspend, revise or rescind given its significant regulatory burden that encumbers American energy production, economic growth and job creation.”

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100-days  natural-gas  infrastructure  energy-policies  trump 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 26, 2017

The first 100 days of a new presidential administration present an opportunity to establish priorities that will guide government policy for the next four years. Maintaining and strengthening the U.S. advantage as the world’s leading producer and refiner of oil and natural gas should be a top focus – not only for our energy security but for the economic, national security and environmental benefits oil and natural gas reliably provide.

The American people have a firm understanding of the importance of oil and natural gas. Recent survey results reveal that more than 80 percent of voters agree that U.S. oil and natural gas production can help achieve each of their most important priorities: job creation, economic growth, lower energy costs and energy security.

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consumers  gasoline-prices  energy-costs  emission-reductions  energy-exports  access  infrastructure 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 28, 2016

Despite occasional policy obstacles, the U.S. energy revolution continues to enhance America’s economic and national security and deliver major benefits to consumers, the environment and manufacturers. With commonsense, market-based, consumer-focused energy policies, the new Congress and incoming administration can maintain and extend our global energy leadership.

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ozone  regulation  epa34  economic-impacts  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted June 15, 2016

To comply with standards approaching or below naturally occurring levels of ozone, states could be required to restrict everything from manufacturing and energy development to infrastructure projects like roads and bridges. Even if job growth were strong, saddling states with unachievable requirements would be questionable policy at best. In an economy still struggling to add jobs, new ozone regulations that impact such a wide range of job creators – and promise little to no public health benefit – make no sense.

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jobs  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  investment  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

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methane-emissions  oil-and-natural-gas-production  hydraulic-fracturing  carbon-dioxide  regulation 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 30, 2016

Methane emissions have dropped significantly. Since 2005, emissions from field production of natural gas have dropped 38 percent, and emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells have plunged 79 percent.

These facts bear repeating in light of the Obama administration’s announcement that it is pursuing yet another set of methane regulations. Not only are the additional regulations duplicative and unnecessary, given industry’s success in reducing emissions under current regulations, but the new rules could actually undermine progress.

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offshore-energy-development  offshore-leasing  gulf-of-mexico  alaska  arctic  atlantic-ocs 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 23, 2016

The Obama administration’s decision last week to eliminate the Atlantic from the next federal offshore leasing plan is a step backward for American energy policy. Despite bipartisan support in Congress and from voters in coastal states, the administration is doubling down on a shortsighted policy that keeps 87 percent of federally controlled offshore acreage off limits to energy exploration.

Expanding access to America’s energy resources – both offshore and onshore – is vital to our future energy security and economic growth.

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atlantic-ocs  offshore-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas-production  us-energy-security  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 9, 2016

Offshore oil production in the Gulf of Mexico is set to reach a record high next year, according to new projections from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). By the end of 2017, production is projected to reach 1.9 million barrels per day, accounting for 21 percent of total U.S. crude oil production.

That represents a crucial contribution to America’s energy security, economy and global energy leadership. Imagine if we doubled it. Opening areas in the Atlantic, Pacific and Eastern Gulf of Mexico could lead to production of more than 3.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day – almost twice the amount EIA projects we’ll hit next year in the western Gulf alone.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  e1534  ethanol  consumers 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 3, 2016

The RFS was in the spotlight again last week, as the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee conducted an oversight hearing on the policy. It’s a law that certainly invites scrutiny due to the significant and wide-ranging damage it causes. Besides raising the consumer price index for food by 25 percent since 2005 because ethanol production has diverted nearly 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop from food to fuel, the policy is also bad for drivers and the economy.

In testimony before the committee, Lucian Pugliaresi, president of the Energy Policy Research Foundation, Inc. (EPRINC), shared EPRINC’s conclusion that continuing to administer the RFS as written “would increase gasoline prices from approximately 30 cents to 50 cents a gallon” and cautioned Congress to address “the risk to economic recovery” this poses. 

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lng-exports  natural-gas  jobs  global-markets  economic-security  russia  electricity 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 24, 2016

Two separate but related news items last week demonstrate the economic promise and geopolitical significance of America’s natural gas export opportunity

The first headline, “U.S. LNG Set to Hit Global Market,” signifies a landmark moment in America’s trajectory from energy scarcity to abundance. The export facility covered in the article – Cheniere Energy’s Sabine Pass in Cameron Parish, La. – actually opened as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in 2008. Just two years later in September 2010, it became the first U.S. facility to apply for a Department of Energy permit to export LNG. After a decade that saw U.S. natural gas production jump 45 percent – and following an extensive review process – Sabine Pass is set to ship its first cargo to Europe.

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